Bees and burdoc
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Thread: Bees and burdoc

  1. #1
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    Default Bees and burdoc

    Do honey bees work burdoc?

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Quote Originally Posted by Sickdog5 View Post
    Do honey bees work burdoc?
    Yes.
    Burdock is a good enough nectar source; bees like it.
    Here is a perfect picture too:
    https://sowtrueseed.com/products/burdock
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    yes I had several in my yard last year and they were quite popular in mid-summer.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  5. #4
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    Default

    What kind of lunatic would willingly plant burdock. Its a noxious weed in ColoradoAnd would be illegal to plant.

  6. #5
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    Default

    Not a lunatic. Just growing around my house naturally

  7. #6
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Looks like one man's noxious weed could be another man's vegetable. I'll swap you a poke weed for three burdocks. Poke is supposedly edible if you boil it three times and discard the water after each boiling . Yuck.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolacca_americana
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Burdock is indeed edible and has medicinal properties to it as well.
    I meant to dig up some in spring and.... did not get to it.

    Very good to excellent nectar source and loved by finches for its seeds.
    I have it around on many scrappy lands nearby and don't mind it there.
    Bugs and birds are people too - they need food, don't they.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  9. #8
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    Byron, Il, USA
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    Burdock is indeed edible and has medicinal properties to it as well.
    I meant to dig up some in spring and.... did not get to it.

    Very good to excellent nectar source and loved by finches for its seeds.
    I have it around on many scrappy lands nearby and don't mind it there.
    Bugs and birds are people too - they need food, don't they.
    We eat it. My wife likes it, I tolerate it. Traditional Japanese food. The part you eat is the root of the young plant, and it has a thick, fibrous taproot that goes way deep. Takes forever to dig up. I actually planted it a few times, but decided it wasn't worth the effort.

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Quote Originally Posted by AR1 View Post
    We eat it. My wife likes it, I tolerate it. Traditional Japanese food. The part you eat is the root of the young plant, and it has a thick, fibrous taproot that goes way deep. Takes forever to dig up. I actually planted it a few times, but decided it wasn't worth the effort.
    Good to hear!
    I need to remember for the fall/spring time (when there are young plants) and ask some advice food-wise.

    An old apple orchard I prune every spring has lots of burdock. A small plantation, really.
    I just let it be there for the bees and bugs.
    I will stomp some burdock down to get around, but even those stomped down plants will still survive and bloom.
    Every little pasture adds to the local foraging quality.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Quote Originally Posted by AR1 View Post
    We eat it. My wife likes it, I tolerate it. Traditional Japanese food. The part you eat is the root of the young plant, and it has a thick, fibrous taproot that goes way deep. Takes forever to dig up. I actually planted it a few times, but decided it wasn't worth the effort.
    I sow seeds in large bags (those often used by gardeners to grow potatoes) so that I do not have to dig. After harvesting the roots in fall, I plant the crowns in the ground, so that they can flower next summer.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuro View Post
    I sow seeds in large bags (those often used by gardeners to grow potatoes) so that I do not have to dig. After harvesting the roots in fall, I plant the crowns in the ground, so that they can flower next summer.
    Tried that. Didn't work so well. Needs to be somewhere convenient to water regularly, and my garden wasn't. We have dug up and eaten wild burdock. Tastes the same. Bland.

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    Quote Originally Posted by AR1 View Post
    ....Bland.
    Well, meat is bland.
    Potatoes are bland.
    And yet I love my meat and potatoes.
    Cooking is all about spices and seasoning.
    Anyway, I want to try this burdock thing for myself, when in season.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Bees and burdoc

    The burdock I grow is “Chiko” variety of greater burdock (Arctium lappa), which may or may not taste like wild ones (I think they are mostly lesser burdock Arctium minus. I have never eaten them). I do not think bees care which one, their flowers look pretty much the same. Just remember, if you sow seeds in spring, they will not flower until summer next year (the roots need be harvested in fall the first year).

    I usually cut them into long thin strips along with carrots, and
    A. blanch and toss with mayo and black pepper.
    B. stir-fry using sesame oil and season with teriyaki sauce.
    C. mix with tempura batter and deep-fry.
    D. use in chicken noodle soup.

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