Subspecies identification by color pattern - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Delhi, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,511

    Default Re: Subspecies identification by color pattern

    Quote Originally Posted by 19ranger84 View Post
    Sprich Englisch..... What is CPV???????
    With CBPV the bees are usually crowded in the hive, maybe the weather is keeping them in and it is a big colony, and rub up against each other and break the hairs on their bodies; if the virus is present in the hive this can cause the virus to enter the bees body through the broken hairs. They can look “hairless”, no stripes on them, just black bodies. You can find piles of dead bees in front of the hive.
    Western Catskill Mountains
    Proverbs 16:24

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Subspecies identification by color pattern

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    This color pattern showed up in my yard this year. My bees have for the past two years been clearly identifiable as predominantly A.m.Carnica. Is this what A.m.Ligustica can look like? The pictures on Wiki show a more pronounced stripe.

    Attachment 50103

    Sorry for the crappy photo I thought I had it more centered when I took it. Note the almost lack of stripe over most of the abdomen and then the black butt.
    I have (see) some of mine that have no stripes and a solid black tip that is about 1/4-1/3 of the abdomen, but you could describe almost any pattern and I could probably find it somewhere in my colonies. I have seen this type bee for years and no diseases.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Santa Rsoa County, FL, USA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I'm glad someone finally asked the CPV question. You seasoned folks need to remember us newbies don't know all the lingo. Thank you for all the knowledgeable input.
    westy
    FL, USA

  5. #24
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Grand Rapids MI USA
    Posts
    1,425

    Default Re: Subspecies identification by color pattern

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    With CBPV the bees are usually crowded in the hive, maybe the weather is keeping them in and it is a big colony, and rub up against each other and break the hairs on their bodies; if the virus is present in the hive this can cause the virus to enter the bees body through the broken hairs. They can look “hairless”, no stripes on them, just black bodies. You can find piles of dead bees in front of the hive.
    I had a flare up of CBPV in 2015 due to mite loads while experimenting with brood breaks. Not only hairless but they had a greasy look and couldn’t walk properly, let alone fly.
    Rod

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Morro Bay, California, USA
    Posts
    2,231

    Default Re: Subspecies identification by color pattern

    I get CBPV in overwintered hives the 3rd summer or so. The bees crowd on the bottom board, and tumble off on to the ground in a heap. They die just inches from the bottom board by the thousands. One hive will express, but doesn't spread to other hives quickly if at all. Perhaps one case per 40 colony apiary per season.

    I expect many hobbyists claims of "pesticide" poisonings are actually flare ups of CBPV, as the symptom -- drunken bees tumbling off the bottom board in the middle of summer -- is similar.

    The management suggestions: Clean comb or ozone sterilized comb. This is way too intensive for my time available. CBPV is reported as **not** Varroa transmitted, and indeed doesn't seem to correlate with high mite seasons or loads.

    CBPV is a good reason to keep hive young and vigorous. Doesn't flare up in new colonies.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Delhi, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,511

    Default Re: Subspecies identification by color pattern

    Yes, what you just described happened to 3 out of 19 hives last year. Piles of dead bees, I couldn’t figure out what happened. Those 3 hives made it through the winter, and are still going; I didn’t do anything to them but did have one hive tested in still a high titer of the virus but seem to be tolerating it. I did see one hairless bee walk into the hive, but no piles yet. You mentioned pesticide kill; you can identify between that and CBPV by the way the dead bees are on the ground..pesticide kill is a “carpet” of dead bees, whereas CBPV is a big pile.
    Western Catskill Mountains
    Proverbs 16:24

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