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Thread: Almost....

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    10,037

    Default Re: Almost....

    Thanks, interesting. They are not used in my country at all.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Almost....

    Quote Originally Posted by Deepwoods View Post
    I put out a dozen swarm traps over several days 2-3 weeks ago. There are almost no beeks in my remote rural area and I wasn't sure what would be out there for wild/feral bees. Returning from a vacation yesterday I checked my traps. The last one I checked had this result. It seems my trap attracted a swarm, but they took up residence immediately under the trap and have built an open, exposed nest. It's about the size of a basketball and there are several rows of white comb visible. This is northern MN, they certainly aren't going to make the winter where they are.

    I'm looking for suggestions on how to handle this. It's 12' up under a deer stand. My thought is to put a section of construction scaffold under the nest so I have a platform to work from. If I put a box under the nest any bees that fall out when I'm working on a cutout should end up in the hive box. Today I made some folding frames ( https://beesource.com/build-it-yours...tching-frames/ ) to hold the cut comb and enable it to fit in a hive box.

    Cut outs are new to me... Do I simply smoke the comb to move the bees out of the way while I'm cutting it from it's perch, then scoop bees and drop them into the box? Will applying 1:1 sugar syrup with a spray bottle make them any easier to handle? This is a half mile from the closest road, so a bee vac isn't an option. What are the odds the queen will fly during this operation?

    Other ideas gratefully accepted!

    Deepwoods

    Attachment 49857 Attachment 49859 Attachment 49861
    I'm wondering if you could tie a box with or without a few frames of drawn comb to the underside of the stand, then take a towel with some of that bee quick that is used to push bees out of honey boxes, and place it on the deck of the stand and drive the bees down into the box. then lower the box and cut the combs loose and place in the box till you get home.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Almost....

    This is how I always do cut-offs if you can slide a wide knife or scraper cleanly across the top of the comb.
    If you want to get fancy, you can close the box, cut a hole in it, tape a little queen excluder over the hole, and put the box back as close as you can. Come back at dusk.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tim KS View Post
    My 2 cents worth....

    I think I would find a box about as deep as the nest is (deep or medium) and hold this box under the nest and cut the whole nest at once and let it drop (short fall) into the box and close he lid. Take the box home and work to re-hive it there.
    Save as much of the comb as you can and rubber band it into frames and hope for the best. Hopefully the queen will survive the short drop.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Almost....

    If it's small and recent, the only difference between shaking a swarm into a box and doing this, is that as long as you have the right size cardboard box and don't completely ruin the integrity of the combs when you drop them, the bees are much less likely to abscond later from your box, even without the queen excluder. In an established tree hive I'll cut each frame at a time into a cardboard box, and return later for a second box I leave to catch the rest of the bees. If I can't do it on site.

    Quote Originally Posted by barnaby View Post
    This is how I always do cut-offs if you can slide a wide knife or scraper cleanly across the top of the comb.
    If you want to get fancy, you can close the box, cut a hole in it, tape a little queen excluder over the hole, and put the box back as close as you can. Come back at dusk.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Santa Rsoa County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Don't think I would try and get to fancy. Whatever you carry into the woods you are going to have to carry out!
    westy
    FL, USA

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
    Posts
    559

    Default Re: Almost....

    Quote Originally Posted by Deepwoods View Post
    I put out a dozen swarm traps over several days 2-3 weeks ago. There are almost no beeks in my remote rural area and I wasn't sure what would be out there for wild/feral bees. Returning from a vacation yesterday I checked my traps. The last one I checked had this result. It seems my trap attracted a swarm, but they took up residence immediately under the trap and have built an open, exposed nest. It's about the size of a basketball and there are several rows of white comb visible. This is northern MN, they certainly aren't going to make the winter where they are.

    I'm looking for suggestions on how to handle this. It's 12' up under a deer stand. My thought is to put a section of construction scaffold under the nest so I have a platform to work from. If I put a box under the nest any bees that fall out when I'm working on a cutout should end up in the hive box. Today I made some folding frames ( https://beesource.com/build-it-yours...tching-frames/ ) to hold the cut comb and enable it to fit in a hive box.

    Cut outs are new to me... Do I simply smoke the comb to move the bees out of the way while I'm cutting it from it's perch, then scoop bees and drop them into the box? Will applying 1:1 sugar syrup with a spray bottle make them any easier to handle? This is a half mile from the closest road, so a bee vac isn't an option. What are the odds the queen will fly during this operation?

    Other ideas gratefully accepted!

    Deepwoods

    Attachment 49857 Attachment 49859 Attachment 49861
    So there are bees in your Area, thats good news. Try to figure out why they would rather not go into your trap.
    Also maybe check more often, for that much comb they were there more than a week.
    GG

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,894

    Default Re: Almost....

    Quote Originally Posted by Westy53 View Post
    Don't think I would try and get to fancy. Whatever you carry into the woods you are going to have to carry out!
    +1
    I pretty much carry around a backpack.
    All the tools/supplies must fit in.
    Once you start bush-wacking out and wide, gotta think as an outdoors-man (you have the tool on you or you dont have it), not as a backyard beek (the garage is 10 steps away).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, NJ, USA
    Posts
    312

    Default Re: Almost....

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim KS View Post
    My 2 cents worth....

    I think I would find a box about as deep as the nest is (deep or medium) and hold this box under the nest and cut the whole nest at once and let it drop (short fall) into the box and close he lid. Take the box home and work to re-hiveny it there.
    Save as much of the comb as you can and rubber band it into frames and hope for the best. Hopefully the queen will survive the short drop.
    That would crush and drown too many bees.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Lake of the Woods, MN, USA
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Almost....

    I returned today with a generator and a buckethead bee vac. These bees are remarkably gentle, no “negative reinforcement” from them at all. Things went well vacuuming up the majority of the bees, then cutting loose comb and rubber banding into monofilament wired frames or placing in Dee Lusby style hinged frames. The comb contained nectar, pollen, and brood. There was enough comb to pretty much fill an 8 frame deep hive. I added a second box with foundationless frames to provide plenty of room for the bees in the vac.
    A nasty thunderstorm arrived about the time the bees were being transferred into the hive from the vac. Things were duct taped down before beating a hasty retreat from the storm. This storm had lots of wind, trees and branches blown down around the countryside. Returned 1 hours later to find the hive box blown off the scaffold, lying on its side on the ground and lots of unhappy and confused bees flying around. Fortunately, the boxes had been screwed together with brackets to make moving easier. I righted the hive and put it back on the scaffold. I didn’t have the heart to open things up to check for damage, these girls didn’t need any more trauma today. An inner cover and telescoping cover were added and a ratchet strap secured the hive this time.
    I plan to leave them alone for a few days to collect stragglers and get themselves together again before moving the hive to a location inside an electric bear fence. I didn’t see the queen, but there were a few bees fanning with their butts in the air at the hive entrance as I was picking up things to depart. If this queen makes it she will be called Lucky!
    Bee vac.jpg Brood comb.jpg Storm aftermath.jpg Strapped down.jpg

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