How do you ventilate Layens hives? - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    NE Perry County, Ohio
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: How do you ventilate Layens hives?

    Thanks for the suggestion.

    Those are good discussions but none I saw specifically addressed: if ventilation is key for Langstroth hives and quilt/ moisture boxes are requisite for may geo locations, how do closed-top Layens-type hives address this?

    Specifically: if moisture removal is key for one type of hive, is it key for all.

    Especially the idea that Layens' hives are designed to be visited 1-2 times/year and MOL take care of themselves.

    I'm reading Layens book now and I hope to learn more there.

    Thanks again.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,208

    Default Re: How do you ventilate Layens hives?

    Quote Originally Posted by jfh00jfh View Post
    Thanks for the suggestion.

    Those are good discussions but none I saw specifically addressed: if ventilation is key for Langstroth hives and quilt/ moisture boxes are requisite for may geo locations, how do closed-top Layens-type hives address this?

    Specifically: if moisture removal is key for one type of hive, is it key for all.

    Especially the idea that Layens' hives are designed to be visited 1-2 times/year and MOL take care of themselves.

    I'm reading Layens book now and I hope to learn more there.

    Thanks again.
    Well, those commercial Lang hives have no under-frame space to speak off (often retro-mitigated by the under-frame racks, empty super box at the bottom, etc - for better moisture dissipation in winter). Also, a typical Lang keeper does not create an empty side air-pocket for better moisture dissipation.

    Empty side-pockets/under-frame space are signature ways to winter in the Layen's (and the similar deep and long hives).

    The moisture removal (your concern) is achieved by
    1)direct ventilation - up and out
    and/or
    2)dissipation to the drier volume of the hive due to moisture gradients - down and to the side

    In reality, this is always some combination of #1 and #2 (and something else - say, wind exposure).

    Long hives (unlike typical Langs) have better configuration for #2 (#1 still being a part of the picture) and so #2 is to be taken advantage off since you have it built-in.

    Like I said, in my current setups I feel I allow for too MUCH ventilation in the cold season (subsequently, bees have to work harder to warm themselves - too much heat is lost from the cluster - energy is sucked away due to too much ventilation).
    Will modify my follower boards to be tighter for this winter - there is too much drafting around them as it is now.

    Regarding 1-2 visits per the year - I too believed into the story originally.
    Now, I have to clarify - G. Layens was resident of Southern France or thereabouts - minimal care is needed for wintering - no care for the current mite situation either.
    L. Sharashkin is in Southen MO (those pictures of his snowed hives - you just have smile at them - he really has no winter - I know, because I lived in the KC area for about 10 years).
    Basically, if you are in the USDA 4 or bordering it - this will be more than 1-2 visits per year just so you can winterize the hives (end then undo it).
    Also, L. Sharashkin must make it clear - 1-2 visits per a year are only possible if you do not have to deal with the mites at all (diff subject here) - not possible in the majority of locations.
    Last edited by GregV; 07-08-2019 at 11:01 AM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame experimentation.

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