Moonshine jugs?
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Thread: Moonshine jugs?

  1. #1
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    Default Moonshine jugs?

    I happened to find a crazy deal on clear glass moonshine jugs, with cork stoppers, brand new in cases. Two sizes, 750ml and 375ml. I picked them up locally from a guy who has thousands of them. They were like $1.66 each......I wish I had more of a need for them, I'd get them all.

    So I was originally wanting to put my honey mead in them so I don't have to scrounge wine bottles in dumpsters out of town (I live in a dry county).....Then I started wondering why I couldn't put honey in them....Might make it sell better.....I know I always buy jelly in those jars with handles if I can find it......So a Moonshine jug with that little handle thing up top might be interesting for folks.

    Has anyone seen honey in Moonshine jugs before?
    8 years, 30 colonies, no chemical treatments

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    nope but it should work if you can clean them and seal it better then a cork. cork will let air through and crystallize it quicker
    Terrence

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by kaizen View Post
    nope but it should work if you can clean them and seal it better then a cork. cork will let air through and crystallize it quicker
    I was thinking of putting in the stopper, then dipping it in wax, like they do with wine bottles.......but regular beeswax, not the red stuff......Not sure, but I think that shuts down airflow.....
    8 years, 30 colonies, no chemical treatments

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by c-bees View Post
    I was thinking of putting in the stopper, then dipping it in wax, like they do with wine bottles.......but regular beeswax, not the red stuff......Not sure, but I think that shuts down airflow.....
    See if you can dip the stoppers in was off the bottle. If you dip the whole thing the consumer will take it off and possibly crystallize quicker as no wax. Being as you are in the moonshine area i'd somehow try and capitalize off the name and market it for tourists.
    Terrence

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by kaizen View Post
    See if you can dip the stoppers in was off the bottle. .... Being as you are in the moonshine area i'd somehow try and capitalize off the name and market it for tourists.
    Yeah, "Moonshine Honey" might go gangbusters.......Not sure what you meant by the first sentence....
    8 years, 30 colonies, no chemical treatments

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by c-bees View Post
    Yeah, "Moonshine Honey" might go gangbusters.......Not sure what you meant by the first sentence....
    I'm picturing your stoppers as a big cork with a wider top that is outside of the bottle. I was saying just dip that part that sits outside the bottle so the wax stays on . either way the glass is a nice idea
    Terrence

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by kaizen View Post
    nope but it should work if you can clean them and seal it better then a cork. cork will let air through and crystallize it quicker
    Air causing Crystallization? Thats a new one.

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by I'llbeedan View Post
    Air causing Crystallization? Thats a new one.
    If you want to ask a question or debate please do. For you i will explain more precisely........an open cork allows outside and inside air and conditions to transfer. Anyone that has made wine knows that. On that thinking air movement will cause quicker water evaporation as it precipitates out. remove water from glucose and you have crystallization. Normal honey containers are sealed.
    Terrence

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    FWIW, Mann-Lake sells the Muth jar which uses a cork. There is no indication in the description that the corks have been waxed or sealed to prevent air or water vapor transmission.

    https://www.mannlakeltd.com/catalogs...t/?q=Muth+jars
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    FWIW, Mann-Lake sells the Muth jar which uses a cork. There is no indication in the description that the corks have been waxed or sealed to prevent air or water vapor transmission.

    https://www.mannlakeltd.com/catalogs...t/?q=Muth+jars
    right. Anyone use these that can weigh in? They sell the plastic shrink wrap for them as well which would limit or stop air flow like wax.
    Terrence

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    I frequently use the 16 oz. Muth jars with the big cork because they are good sellers, especially during the Christmas holiday season. When I harvest and bottle ahead with the Muth jars I do not tighten the cork in case there is crystallization starting to show in the bottle, and I then immerse the lower 7/8ths of the bottle in hot water with the cork removed. When the crystals have gone back into solution I firmly cork the bottle, shrink safety seal it, and label or hang-tag it. It is only then ready to market, and I'm proud of it.

    I believe that the crystallization of honey is principally related to the nectar source, and time and has very little to do with the air in the headspace or the permeability of the cork seal.

    Cheers,
    Steve

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    I bought 12 of the 8oz ones and was going to dip in wax but never got around to doing it. The honey is now almost a year old and only a small amount of crystallization on the bottom.
    Oklahoma bee keeper

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    I've used a few Muth jars and held them for over a year and never saw them granulate any faster than glass jars with metal lids. I use the heat shrink seals, but the the whole top of the cork is uncovered. I don't think air has anything to do with granulation. My comb honey dish sits on the table with a loose fitting cover and the puddle of honey around it stays liquid for a long time. In the winter, when the house is very dry, the liquid part will get almost like taffy.
    Last edited by Schultz; 06-28-2019 at 03:28 PM.

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by kaizen View Post
    If you want to ask a question or debate please do. For you i will explain more precisely........an open cork allows outside and inside air and conditions to transfer. Anyone that has made wine knows that. On that thinking air movement will cause quicker water evaporation as it precipitates out. remove water from glucose and you have crystallization. Normal honey containers are sealed.
    Any wine maker will also tell you the reason Wine bottles are laid on their side is to keep the cork wet thus causing swelling and minimizing air infiltration. The air allowed in a wine or mead bottle through the cork is minuscule and can hardly be considered "Air Movement" more like a subtle exposure. The oxidation caused by it is beneficial in bringing flavor profiles to maturity. Long term storage can be complicated and complexed which most mazers choose to use synthetic corks.

    However we are not discussing wine and mead you were discussing Honey Crystallization. And I am here to tell you straight up Evaporation or exposure to air has NOTHING to do with crystallization. Once Nectar becomes honey it already contains more sugar then the water can support and will eventually crystalize. The amount of glucose in honey determines how likely and how soon it will crystallize, with crystallization happening sooner if the honey contains higher amounts of glucose. Since honey is comprised of 4 different types of sugars the percentage of each in the mix determines the speed at which a given batch will crystalize. Also the amount and type of other solids within the honey for the glucose to attach and form crystals play a factor. I was not asking a question or a debate I was trying to kindly suggest you needed to review the facts and rethink your statement. Normal honey containers are sealed because of sanitation and contamination Not to prevent crystallization. Many countries outside the U.S. store honey in a variety unsealed containers.

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Quote Originally Posted by kaizen View Post
    If you want to ask a question or debate please do. For you i will explain more precisely........an open cork allows outside and inside air and conditions to transfer. Anyone that has made wine knows that. On that thinking air movement will cause quicker water evaporation as it precipitates out. remove water from glucose and you have crystallization. Normal honey containers are sealed.
    It was my understanding that honey is Hygroscopic - i.e. it actually draws moisture out of the air rather than evaporates. If that's true the risk of air exposure is fermentation rather than crystallization.

    While beyond my level of expertise, I wouldn't expect a sealed cork jar to let enough air in to affect the moisture content of the honey in a meaningful way. Unlike wine, OP's honey likely wont be sitting in bottles for many years before it's consumed. Not enough air exchange through a cork to have any effect.

  17. #16
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    Default Re: Moonshine jugs?

    Recommended procedure is to boil the mix long enough to kill any native yeasts, allow it to cool to the preferred temp for the yeast, siphon it into the bucket, add the yeast, cover the bucket with cheesecloth, and place it in a temperature stable environment for 1 week or two. Then filter it and siphon it into the carboy (if it does not go up to the neck of the bottle, add marbles until it does) and ad an airlock. Wait 2 weeks and rack the good part off into another glass carboy, leaving the sediment at the bottom undisturbed (=> don't transfer the sediment!!!) Wait another month and rack it again. Wait another month and rack it a 3rd time. Wait 2 months and rack it a 4th time. Some recipes will require still more racking to get clear mead. This is all still using an airlock, as long as CO2 is being produced. Then kill the yeast and back sweeten if preferred. When it is ready to siphon into bottles, use a bottle capper, which withstands much more pressure than corks. After it has aged in a small hand-dug cave on the North side of a hill for the preferred number of years, THEN remove the caps and cork the bottles. Everyone wants the cork experience me included.

    Have I ever seen mead in a moonshine jug? ME??? Never! Nope, no way, huh-uhn, negatory. I had my eyes closed.

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