new study on hive density and yard configuration
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    10,018

    Default new study on hive density and yard configuration

    "Reduced density and visually complex apiaries reduce parasite load and promote honey production and overwintering survival in honey bees."

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31120911


    now they tell me. pretty much the management strategy i plan to implement pending recovery of the efb outbreak.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
    Posts
    2,016

    Default Re: new study on hive density and yard configuration

    Interesting. Food for thought. Thanks Squarepeg.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    3,931

    Default Re: new study on hive density and yard configuration

    Square...
    now they tell me. pretty much the management strategy i plan to implement pending recovery of the efb outbreak
    What isn't mentioned is that the mowing is going to be much more complicated.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    1,207

    Default Re: new study on hive density and yard configuration

    Good post - thanks.

    ... foragers were more than three times more likely to drift in the HD apiary configurations.
    And yet so many people will insist on placing their hives a few inches apart - good to see some evidence to back up the advice to space them much further apart.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Lambton Shores, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: new study on hive density and yard configuration

    Its an interesting study, but with so many variables that its hard to nail down which ones were the beneficial ones.

    The "high density" colonies had 8 hives, all:
    • the same colour
    • the same height above the ground
    • doors in the same direction
    • in a single linear row with 1 meter (3') spacing.


    The "low density" colonies had 8 hives which were:
    • different colours and had different patterns painted on them
    • were positioned different heights above the ground
    • had their doors orientated in different directions
    • were arranged in a circle with 10 meter (33') spacing


    That's a lot of variables between the two test groups, and I wonder which ones are truly necessary and which ones are not. Colour + door orientation may be just as good as large spacing (or have no effect), but as the study is designed, there is no way to determine which variables are responsible for the reduced drift.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Houston, TX, USA
    Posts
    632

    Default Re: new study on hive density and yard configuration

    My hives are currently setup in 2 rows of 6 pairs. I requeened 8 in these rows and setup 6 nucs dropped around in the field. 5 out of the 6 nucs resulted in laying queens. One (1) of the eight in the rows did. It felt like some may have swarmed with the new queen, but it could have been a lost queen and major drift. I'm glad I had the nuc backup.

    I'll be rearranging shortly. New queens for increase again after I pull honey.

    To add because of the previous post. All my boxes are white, 8 frame medium. The nucs were singles, those in the rows were at least 3 with much larger population. More variables to consider...

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