What Happened to these bees
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  1. #1
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    Default What Happened to these bees

    Anyone care to hazard a guess what happened to these bees? All were flying and appeared to be doing fine less than a week later this is what every hive looked like!! there were 15 of them!!


    Miller bees 4-6-19 1.jpg Hive 7M Open 1.jpg Dead bees (3).jpg
    Last edited by I'llbeedan; 05-19-2019 at 07:41 AM.

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  3. #2
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    syracuse n.y.
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    going on our weather up here, food
    mike syracuse ny
    Whatever you subsidize you get more of. Ronald Reagan

  4. #3
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Quote Originally Posted by wildbranch2007 View Post
    going on our weather up here, food
    Isn't picture #3 honey and uncapped honey?

    Some kind of poisoning would be my guess.
    All of my opinions and suggestions are based on my five decades of actual beekeeping,
    not so much on book learning, watching YouTube videos nor reading internet sites.

  5. #4
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    The bees that are alive look greasy. I think I read somewhere that is a symptom of a disease. I don't recall what it was though.
    I have also seen that look in a hive when the entrance was blocked.
    I'm just guessing.
    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  6. #5
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    Colorado Springs, CO United States
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    I am with AHudd, to me it appears that the bees “look wet/greasy”. Most likely associated with tracking something poisonous into the hive, with enough quantities for their demise;(
    Please excuse me, I am now free to go manage & treat ;)
    my ladies the best way I know how.

  7. #6
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    Wimer, Oregon
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    looks like what mine did when poisoned, I had 3 out of 12 hives in 2016 that were hit, and had the exact same appearance.
    I had mine tested by the Oregon Dept AG, came back positive with imicloprid. ORAG had me gather as many bees from each hive as possible then freeze them until they could come out and start the investigation.
    Cannabis growers were suspect, but they could not prove which farm was the culprit. I was surrounded by 7 cannabis farms within 2 miles.
    I moved all my hives in 2017 to new locations

    call your dept of ag and see what they can do to help

    sorry bout your hives
    DavidZ

  8. #7
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    I also vote for poison. In most cases where mites or diseases cause bee death, many of the bees die away from the colony. These seem to have died all at once.
    54+ years 16 colonies Treat using OAV
    http://99-40.com

  9. #8
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Quote Originally Posted by AHudd View Post
    The bees that are alive look greasy. I think I read somewhere that is a symptom of a disease. I don't recall what it was though.
    I have also seen that look in a hive when the entrance was blocked.
    I'm just guessing.
    Alex
    There are NONE alive every bee in the picture is dead!!

  10. #9

    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Just a curiosity, but that honey looks a little funny. It isn’t stored in a contiguous fashion, as bees would typically do it. It is all over the place. None capped.
    Don’t get offended, but by chance did you pour any sugar syrup onto those combs in an effort to save the bees?
    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. - Emerson

  11. #10
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    You guys may be better able to see than me, but looks like capped brood possibly to me, and what I assume resembles nectar kinda looks like a shallow cell due to something like entombed pollen. Thinking starvation is a possibility. Was there any honey in the hive? Toothpick will confirm whether that was honey or brood, nectar or wax.
    Hindsight is 20/10, not 20/20...
    After the fact, I always know what didn't work.

  12. #11
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    >"Cannabis growers were suspect, but they could not prove which farm was the culprit. I was surrounded by 7 cannabis farms within 2 miles."

    Yummy high! Imicloprid pot! A systemic pesticide on something you are going to smoke? Or you are smart enough to not smoke any and just sell it?
    All of my opinions and suggestions are based on my five decades of actual beekeeping,
    not so much on book learning, watching YouTube videos nor reading internet sites.

  13. #12
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    They look cooked. Starved bees die in a pile but look dry. Cooked bees look greasy and wet. Could the entrances have been blocked by something? Otherwise, its one of the few times I would say acute poisoning (I say one of few, because many times poison is blamed when it is something else entirely). Reminds me of a hive that had Gas poured on it.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Quote Originally Posted by I'llbeedan View Post
    There are NONE alive every bee in the picture is dead!!
    I thought some of the bees on the frame were alive. That's a horse of a different color then. I have seen bees die in that fashion from being blocked in. The bees weaken from the heat and the honey/nectar thins and runs down the side of the frames and gets on the bees, some weaken and die stuck to the frame, some fall to the floor only to be coated with dripping honey. They spread a thin coat of honey all over themselves and the interior of the hive crawling around searching for a way out of their home which has turned into an oven and eventually into a pine box coffin. Poison would be more merciful. Let's hope that's what happened.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  15. #14
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    Just a curiosity, but that honey looks a little funny. It isn’t stored in a contiguous fashion, as bees would typically do it. It is all over the place. None capped.
    Don’t get offended, but by chance did you pour any sugar syrup onto those combs in an effort to save the bees?
    No, I did nothing! But open them up. DSC_0017.jpg

  16. #15
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Quote Originally Posted by ApricotApiaries View Post
    They look cooked. Starved bees die in a pile but look dry. Cooked bees look greasy and wet. Could the entrances have been blocked by something? Otherwise, its one of the few times I would say acute poisoning (I say one of few, because many times poison is blamed when it is something else entirely). Reminds me of a hive that had Gas poured on it.
    All hives had top and bottom entrances. Both were clear there were not even many dead bees on the bottom board.

  17. #16
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Quote Originally Posted by AHudd View Post
    I thought some of the bees on the frame were alive. That's a horse of a different color then. I have seen bees die in that fashion from being blocked in. The bees weaken from the heat and the honey/nectar thins and runs down the side of the frames and gets on the bees, some weaken and die stuck to the frame, some fall to the floor only to be coated with dripping honey. They spread a thin coat of honey all over themselves and the interior of the hive crawling around searching for a way out of their home which has turned into an oven and eventually into a pine box coffin. Poison would be more merciful. Let's hope that's what happened.

    Alex
    I just sent a sample to Beltsville. for all 15 hives to have blocked entrances would be unbelievable. All had both top and bottom entrances and were clear. I burned all 15 hives just in case. It is a shame though.

  18. #17
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Yeah, sudden death of that many hives is suspicious. A shame is putting it mildly.

    Please, let us know what you find out.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  19. #18
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    The open honey has a kind of fermented look to it.Some bees are on their sides like they were mashed into the comb and wet looking.If they were poisoned by something in the fields I wouldnt think they would be wet looking.They look kin of like syrup on them.Also some brood look a little melted down like EFB.I enlarged the pic to see those things.

  20. #19
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Last pic definitely shows wasn't starvation, that was a quick kill. Agree it looks like heat, but shouldn't be the case with top and bottom entrances, and unlikely on several hives at once. Any possibility of an unhappy neighbor? I'd expect something from neonics wouldn't completely kill all hives at once.

    I've heard of people killing entire yards with oav with a bug fogger. Primarily when they forgot that they'd used the fogger to kill mosquitoes last summer.
    Hindsight is 20/10, not 20/20...
    After the fact, I always know what didn't work.

  21. #20
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    Default Re: What Happened to these bees

    Did you have any sudden swings in temps recently? It looks like a moisture or heat issue.

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