Queen
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Thread: Queen

  1. #1

    Default Queen

    Brand new and could use some experienced eyes on this. Installed a package two and a half weeks ago and was thinking we lost the queen. This pic shows pretty much the only brood and larvae in the hive. Havenít found any eggs. The small amount of spottily distributed brood looks weird.
    3623C647-3C07-4073-A058-0DE1F2369AEB.jpg

    Took some pictures during yesterdayís inspection and it looks to me that I found the queen but itís not the clearest shot of her. Am I right that this is the queen? Any opinions on whatís going on with this hive? Thanks.
    E20CA3D6-B826-4607-879D-FF498616159D.jpg

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
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    Default Re: Queen

    welcome to beesource mace! i took the liberty of moving your thread to the 101 subforum.

    that weird looking capped brood appears to be drone brood in worker cells, and if so would indicate a drone laying queen or laying workers.

    it's hard to tell by the photo, but i don't think either one of the bees circled is a queen.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Bath, Maine, United States
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    2,361

    Default Re: Queen

    No queen do I see. Even if there is a queen, there is no acceptable queen.
    That is old comb, does that mean you have another hive? What is available to you for a way forward?
    It is not true that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks.
    They can learn them, they just can't do them.

  5. #4

    Default Re: Queen

    Thanks for the input guys. The posted pic isnít as good as the original, the site seems to be reducing the resolution. I donít think you can actually see the end of the abdomen because itís dark, I wish you could see the original. In this pic the very tip of the arrow is just touching the end of the abdomen so you can get an idea of how long it really is compared to the wings. You guys still sure itís not a queen?

    DFD3251E-751D-4091-A6B5-1BADB7715445.jpg

    Some of the comb is old and yes, there are two more hives and was thinking about adding a comb of brood. A new queen is in the mail and should be here tomorrow but if this is actually a queen Iím not sure what the best step should be. Introduce the new queen and let the colony sort it out? Keep the new queen separated for a day or two to see if the hive improves? (Not sure how long I can keep the new queen going separately). Put the new queen and good brood frame in immediately?

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    10,837

    Default Re: Queen

    I'm bumping this thread as Mace posted a reply (post #4) yesterday afternoon, but the system decided to "moderate" that post and it was not publicly readable.

    Now that the post has been released from the "moderated" queue I wanted to make sure it wasn't lost in the back of the "New Posts" queue.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Bath, Maine, United States
    Posts
    2,361

    Default Re: Queen

    Can't say for sure that it is not a queen, can say for sure she is not worth anymore time. Kill her. If you can find her.

    Depending upon equipment I would divide the existing hive into the two and take a frame from each to start a replacement from scratch.

    (This one should be good for some contrary views.)
    It is not true that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks.
    They can learn them, they just can't do them.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
    Posts
    1,442

    Default Re: Queen

    It looks a little bit like a Queen to me, smooth thorax and long, dark abdomen, still hard to say. Sometimes it takes a few days for a package Queen to get up to speed, but 2.5 weeks should be plenty of time, unless she was a rogue virgin when she arrived. At the very least there should be a lot of eggs by now.
    If you don't want to kill her or you want increase, move her into a split to give her a chance and introduce your new Queen since she is already on the way.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    5,457

    Default Re: Queen

    that's a queen.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Wise county,Texas
    Posts
    287

    Default Re: Queen

    Quote Originally Posted by JRG13 View Post
    that's a queen.
    Agree, also, look how the attending bees almost follow his blue circle line as well.
    ďNever be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the Ark, professionals built the TitanicĒ

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