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  1. #21
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Ok - staying a little more on topic - FWIW - here's my effort at producing double-deep frames - these were/are intended to be used as standing frames in something approaching an A-Z hive:



    And with a starter comb, and a top-bar added so that they can be drawn out within a stack of two standard deep boxes:



    I suppose that if a person was interested in harvesting honey, then the topmost section could be cut away for crushing and straining, and then re-drawn without affecting the sections of comb lower down ? Dunno - honey's not on my radar.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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  3. #22
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    ........I suppose that if a person was interested in harvesting honey, then the topmost section could be cut away for crushing and straining, and then re-drawn without affecting the sections of comb lower down ? Dunno - honey's not on my radar.
    LJ
    Should work.
    I do just about that.

    But also I started recognizing now that single deep frame is best for end-of-season harvest.
    Mid-season/early-season - not so much.
    Hence started this hybrid-hive project - super-deep brood chamber/conventional super(s) on the top.
    Reportedly (written/video), queens never even come out of the super-deep chambers (they like them so much) - no need for any QAs when supering.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  4. #23
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    For 1.5 Dadants, I want to add a vertical mid-rib (like on the modified picture).
    Attachment 48487
    I forgot another reason I chose to have the shallow frame above (acting as a "top-bar") and the deep Dadant attached below.

    I want to be able to turn the deep Dadant partition 90 degrees --> screw a top bar to it --> drop into my narrow-deep hive (and do the opposite moves too as needed).

    This is how I am compatible between the long-deep frame setups and short-deep frame setups.
    The "ear-less" Dadant frame is the compatible media part moving between the two.
    So I want the deep Dadants ear-less - again - hanging at the bottom.

    Like so:
    1.5DadantFrame.jpg
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  5. #24
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Very interesting!

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    Well, you do want some mid-ribs to support the combs (two is a good #).
    Handy when pasting some code into them.
    Attachment 48485

    Or do wires (but I dislike wires anymore - hard to attach combs into those, unlike the horizontal planks).

    For 1.5 Dadants, I want to add a vertical mid-rib (like on the modified picture).
    Attachment 48487
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

  6. #25
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Hi, John,

    I was curious why you said honey wasn't on your radar?
    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post

    I suppose that if a person was interested in harvesting honey, then the topmost section could be cut away for crushing and straining, and then re-drawn without affecting the sections of comb lower down ? Dunno - honey's not on my radar.
    LJ
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

  7. #26
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by Yunzow View Post
    Hi, John,

    I was curious why you said honey wasn't on your radar?
    LJ is much into queen-raising/equipment tinkering "business" (don't know much of a real business is really going on; more of a retirement hobby).
    Anyway, LJ will be in here in person, UK morning time.
    Just covering for him for the time; haha...

    I, on the other hand, need some real honey to stuff into those peanut butter & honey sucking teenagers.
    Partly why I rather not be waiting until late fall for the fresh crop (the usual long hive specialty).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  8. #27
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Matt's Layens channel just published a timely video.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSgo-MzMGBw
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  9. #28
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    LJ is much into queen-raising/equipment tinkering "business" (don't know much of a real business is really going on; more of a retirement hobby).
    Anyway, LJ will be in here in person, UK morning time.
    Just covering for him for the time; haha...
    Greg is spot-on (thanks Greg ) - beekeeping for me is exactly that: a retirement hobby, "a reason for getting out of bed in the morning" ...

    Re: the 'non-honey' - I don't have much choice in that. The land around where I currently live is reclaimed marsh-land, situated at sea-level of course (and thus for drainage needs to be actively pumped from time to time), and has been rated Grade I - the most productive in the country. Over many generations it's gradually become 'agri-industrialised' with brassicas (cabbages, cauliflowers, sprouts etc) being the principle crops, as well as sugar beet, potatoes, and the occasional few fields of wheat. Thus there's precious little nectar to be had from the fields around here, only token amounts from the irrigation ditches between fields. There are a couple of small villages 'within range' with gardens and amenity trees - but it's a helluva long way to fly for a feed.

    (Just 10 miles down the road I often see a few hundred acres or so of OSR (Oil Seed Rape/ Canola) and I keep thinking about how I could best access that - but it makes honey with a horrible taste, imo)

    However, on a positive note - this scenario means that there are no other known beekeepers in the immediate area, so in practice it's effectively semi-isolated, with Varroa being very controllable, and queen-rearing simplified - so it isn't all 'doom and gloom' - but - no honey worth speaking of. Certainly not enough to make it worthwhile harvesting and selling. So my girls keep all they make, and even this needs to be topped-up with sugar-syrup before each winter. Without this supplementary feeding I would only be able to keep a handful of colonies. Fortunately, pollen is in ample supply and available all season long - where DO they get it from (?) - so as long as I continue to supply sugar, the circus here can continue to function ...
    'best
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  10. #29
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    .... Thus there's precious little nectar to be had from the fields around here......LJ
    That's a bummer, LJ.
    I am fortunate to live right next to several large nature preserves (public and private) - lots and lots of "weeds" through the season.
    Lots of early blooming trees too - but generally terrible spring negates the early flow potential.

    So, yes, I am pretty bullish about harvesting lots of honey for our use - but need properly setup hives for it.
    One thing I noticed for sure now - in the largest long hives (16 frames and up), the bees don't really want store nectar into the supers.
    So, either need a shorter hive (10-12 Dadant frames is good) or need to keep them tight using the follower boards and thus force them up.
    This will be needed for the July honey producing hives in my area (or wait until the fall/winter).

    Thus, the biggest hives I got (16 frames and up; single tier) are my resource and fall/winter honey hives.
    The smaller and lighter hives (10-12 Dadant frames; N-tier) are the summer honey hives.
    Something like this should work.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  11. #30
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    I'm going with the off topic.
    As for nectar sources, I'm in a strange spot, but I suspect it is pretty good. I live in a less affluent suburb of Atlanta, just happen to have a random six acres of woods in my subdivision. Lots of trees around in general, we like our trees in the Georgia, mostly pine though, but we like our maple trees, too. And there is a fair amount of "opportunistic" trees like tulip poplar. We have just barely enough elevation to have some sourwood, but not as much as the actual mountains.

    In the late summer and fall, I have a hypothesis that the clear cutting around the power lines actually helps out with late nectar sources. The power company will move everything down once a year and then it gets "overgrown" with wildflowers and such.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Greg is spot-on (thanks Greg ) - beekeeping for me is exactly that: a retirement hobby, "a reason for getting out of bed in the morning" ...

    Re: the 'non-honey' - I don't have much choice in that. The land around where I currently live is reclaimed marsh-land, situated at sea-level of course (and thus for drainage needs to be actively pumped from time to time), and has been rated Grade I - the most productive in the country. Over many generations it's gradually become 'agri-industrialised' with brassicas (cabbages, cauliflowers, sprouts etc) being the principle crops, as well as sugar beet, potatoes, and the occasional few fields of wheat. Thus there's precious little nectar to be had from the fields around here, only token amounts from the irrigation ditches between fields. There are a couple of small villages 'within range' with gardens and amenity trees - but it's a helluva long way to fly for a feed.

    (Just 10 miles down the road I often see a few hundred acres or so of OSR (Oil Seed Rape/ Canola) and I keep thinking about how I could best access that - but it makes honey with a horrible taste, imo)

    However, on a positive note - this scenario means that there are no other known beekeepers in the immediate area, so in practice it's effectively semi-isolated, with Varroa being very controllable, and queen-rearing simplified - so it isn't all 'doom and gloom' - but - no honey worth speaking of. Certainly not enough to make it worthwhile harvesting and selling. So my girls keep all they make, and even this needs to be topped-up with sugar-syrup before each winter. Without this supplementary feeding I would only be able to keep a handful of colonies. Fortunately, pollen is in ample supply and available all season long - where DO they get it from (?) - so as long as I continue to supply sugar, the circus here can continue to function ...
    'best
    LJ
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

  12. #31
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by Yunzow View Post
    ..... the clear cutting around the power lines actually helps out with late nectar sources. The power company will move everything down once a year and then it gets "overgrown" with wildflowers and such.
    +1
    Very beneficial.
    I am happy about finally getting a couple of out-yards close enough to the high voltage power lines - great bee pastures.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  13. #32
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Ok - staying a little more on topic - FWIW - here's my effort at producing double-deep frames - these were/are intended to be used as standing frames ........

    LJ
    Here is a fresh vid from a funny guy (all his honey super frames are just standing, never hanging).
    Here is harvesting his 50mm wide free-standing frames.
    He is also stacking those free-standing frames 3-4 tiers high - a crazy guy, but I am scratching my head and thinking "why not" (also started using just free-standing frames in my horizontals for honey; I just stick in Lang frames - they are standing there; need to take a photo).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cvD5EeI_Ktg
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  14. #33
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Hi Greg - I love some of these videos you dig up, where guys are just 'tearing-up the rule-book' ...

    I don't see any particular problem in using standing frames in a single-story hive - but "how to stack frames" has always had me puzzled. The only possible solutions being those of the A-Z system (2 or 3 supporting steel rods) or the 'Mother-of-God' approach from the Ukraine, where 3 frames are strapped together for stability:



    But - your man now shows us another possibility ...
    'best
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  15. #34
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    Default Re: different size deep horizontal hives

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Hi Greg - I love some of these videos you dig up, where guys are just 'tearing-up the rule-book' ...

    ......But - your man now shows us another possibility ...
    'best
    LJ
    Watch this (below).
    Go to 6:00 and enjoy on forward - this is how about 100 kilos of honey look like - just stacked up.
    This guy does not give a slightest poop about the so-called conventions.

    People are going panicky about a millimeter to the right, so to speak....
    Well, watch this guy and observe that "an extra millimeter to the right" is not the end of the world in the slightest.
    A nut job (and is doing very well for himself - selling tons of bees and honey; raising queens for sale - people are begging for his queens).

    I am learning from beeks like him to really just play by the ear and by my own senses and observations.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHbsBuK3H9I

    Before 6:00 he is demonstrating his queen-raising operation (to those interested, not really my thing).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

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