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Thread: Towel Treatment

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
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    1,697

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    Well I do not know how often you commercial guys inspect your hives, but I inspect my yards at least once a week granted only around 40 colonies and I can tie my treatments down to when I check on the yards. As I have mentioned before each colony will get at least 12 treatments of OAV per year which would not be much more than 15 minutes a year on treatments per hive. Results of state inspections show up with 0 mites per sample on May 14th.2019. I am just one 75 year old guy looking after 40 colonies and the treating of the hives is the easiest part of the work involved in keeping bees.

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  3. #22

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    Quote Originally Posted by johno View Post
    Well I do not know how often you commercial guys inspect your hives, but I inspect my yards at least once a week
    I'm not trying to start an argument but I want to be sure what you are saying here. There is an OAV treatment protocol that involves a once per 7 day cycle results in 0 mites per sample?
    I'm only a 68 year old guy looking after a bit fewer than 200 and I have tried a number of different OAV protocols on my nearby hives and my results aren't even close to yours.
    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. - Emerson

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
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    1,697

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    well let me just tell you what I do, in my area my flow for the year is over by the time we get to June and by late June I will start a regimen of OAV treatments at 5 treatments 5 Days apart, I have given up doing mite checks in July as I have lost robust colonies due to robbing frenzies which get underway once a few hives have been opened enough to get nurse bee samples. I go ahead in Late July into August with another 5 treatments five days apart and will try to monitor mite drops on the few hives I have that still have SBB's If I still see mites falling I will continue treating until there are very few if any, normally the second 5 treatments are enough then in November they all get a treatment again in December and if I get a good day in January I might do them again. in the 8 or 9 years I have kept bees my over winter losses are rarely over 10% and my increases every year have exceeded 100%. I have 2 small yards within a few miles of my home yard and treat them all in less than half a day. Distance between yards could be a problem but I am sure one person could treat 200 hives in a day. My first 2 years of beekeeping I used formic acid treatments but found them to be too temperature dependent for good results and for the last 6 years have used only OAV. I am going into my third year with a band heater vaporizer and OAV has become a breeze. I must also say that I am not in a very heavily bee populated area so I might be missing out on re infection from surrounding hives.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,589

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    Dan, I am about 40 miles from Johno and follow pretty much exactly the same treatment protocol. Like him, my State inspection yielded 0 mites in March in an apiary with 16 hives. I found 3 mites on the board of one hive yesterday so as soon as I get a dry day, the supers are coming off and everybody gets their first treatment of the year. Last treatment was Christmas.

    I use a Provap110 and am pretty sure this method of applying OAV is superior to the pan type. You should buy one one Johno's Easy Vaps and give it a try. You will never go back to using anything else.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Powhatan, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    356

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    I am in the same neighborhood (VA) - 37 hives going into last winter, 37 healthy hives in spring.
    Treatment OAV "standard" 3x7days
    I comment only because I see the trend to more and more frequent OAV 5x5 days etc as very possibly a result of testing after treatment too soon for the varroa population to have returned to normal 20 phoretic / 80 under cappings balance.
    It takes a couple days for the daughter mites to be ready to go into the brood.
    The result is that if you do a mite count too soon after last treatment you get an artificially high count because the population is not at the same balanced ratio as a sample taken before testing.
    After treatment test should be done about 10 days post in order to be comparing apples to apples.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
    Posts
    1,697

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    Been there and done that and then did tests a month later with mite counts above 3% and so had to do it all over again. As I no longer do mite counts I will stick to many treatments which do my bees no harm but not so mites. I have also considered the theory that you have around 20% mites that are phoretic, so if that is the case every time you treat if you get 20% you will still require 5 treatments to get most of them.

  8. #27

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    My point is to the original question of this thread.
    The Randy Oliver oxalic acid/shop towel mite treatments are directed to larger scale beekeepers who are trying to remain profitable.
    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. - Emerson

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
    Posts
    1,697

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    Beemandan, the shop towel treatments directed to larger scale beekeepers who are trying to remain profitable, is sure a fine goal. However this method also seems to suffer from a few problems, It would appear that some colonies almost ignore the towels and do not get any benefit from them while others will spend time trying to remove them and thereby get some benefit. It would appear to me that this treatment will help to maintain a low level of mite infestation from getting out of hand but will not reduce a heavy infestation once it has occurred. I would also suggest that the smaller keeper is just as interested in profitability as the larger ones. The smaller keeper probably has to get a higher return on his colonies to make it worthwhile. Hell if I did not get a reasonable return on my time spent I may as well keep flies, it is a lot easier.

  10. #29

    Default Re: Towel Treatment

    If you are convinced that OAV should be the treatment of choice for commercial beekeepers….I have no intention of debating that with you.
    The op asked about storage issues with a specific request that no one read anything into the question. That request was immediately ignored. Now the thread has morphed into a pro oav direction.
    I will only apologize to the op for being a part of the hijacking.
    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. - Emerson

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