Wintering loss Survey - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    9,873

    Default Re: Wintering loss Survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    NO ACCESS TO EXAMINE THE HIVES!
    Good story. I'm an inspector in my country and see a lot of peoples hives, it is not unusual for new beekeepers to put hives where they think would be a good place for the bees, but they have not yet learned that you need good access for comfortably working them also.

    About the most difficult i have ever come across was 2 hives placed on 2 tree stumps. The stumps had been left around 8 or 9 feet tall and a hive put on top of each one. The stumps were around 2 feet in diameter, there was just nothing at all to stand on, and even clambering up the trunk was no good because once up to the hives there was nothing to hang on to other than the hive which would have toppled. I was able to inspect them by throwing a rope from the truck over a branch of a nearby tree and then kind of winching myself up with that, but it took every muscle in my body to do it plus get a few frames out to check while hanging onto the rope.

    99% certain those hives will be moved next time i go there once the guy has discovered what a crazy place he chose to put them.
    "Thinking Inside The Box"

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Clinton, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    432

    Default Re: Wintering loss Survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    Hmm, I use telescoping covers with insulation in them, and wrap with tar paper and strap insulation on 3 sides, south being exposed. I have no moisture issues at all. A sugar shim w entrance absorbs any extra moisture. I know I go overboard, but my hives winter well. Today I took off the insulation, so now they have the tar paper for a few more weeks. Out of 17 (including a dbl nuc) two died; one a TF top bar. I also had issues with CBPV last year but seem to have made it.
    The winters where I am at arent really that horrible; some snow and cold but nothing too drastic. I would like to find an efficient way to deal with moisture build up that involves the least amount of extra equipment; in other words not looking at storing quilt boxes, etc. I know that the top entrances vent plenty of moisture as I see the ice crystals form in the winter. But I think some insulation on the top covers may be potential answer. I've heard others say they feel it has some advantages. My primary goal is to stop staining all of my frames from moisture. I have used sound board material inside the rim of the migratory cover and that does wick away moisture. Downside is that the material comes out a soggy mess this time of year and makes it hard to handle. Guess probably no perfect one size fits all solution

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Delhi, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,486

    Default Re: Wintering loss Survey

    Well you could keep the foam board all year inside the outer cover; if you use wood inner covers w entrance that would be good too for upper entrance. During the winter though, think of the warm moist air from the bees respiration (and CO2) and when it rises it will not condense on a cold surface, it will run down the sides of the hive. Not everyone uses an upper entrance during the winter. I glue popsicle sticks inside my covers, even on the foam, gives it a bit more ventilation.
    Western Catskill Mountains
    Proverbs 16:24

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Delhi, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,486

    Default Re: Wintering loss Survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Good story. I'm an inspector in my country and see a lot of peoples hives, it is not unusual for new beekeepers to put hives where they think would be a good place for the bees, but they have not yet learned that you need good access for comfortably working them also.

    About the most difficult i have ever come across was 2 hives placed on 2 tree stumps. The stumps had been left around 8 or 9 feet tall and a hive put on top of each one. The stumps were around 2 feet in diameter, there was just nothing at all to stand on, and even clambering up the trunk was no good because once up to the hives there was nothing to hang on to other than the hive which would have toppled. I was able to inspect them by throwing a rope from the truck over a branch of a nearby tree and then kind of winching myself up with that, but it took every muscle in my body to do it plus get a few frames out to check while hanging onto the rope.

    99% certain those hives will be moved next time i go there once the guy has discovered what a crazy place he chose to put them.
    Youll have to get yourself a pair of hooks to climb that! You must see much out there; to tell you the truth, I was shocked. I felt like tweaking his nose.
    Western Catskill Mountains
    Proverbs 16:24

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Clinton, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    432

    Default Re: Wintering loss Survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    Well you could keep the foam board all year inside the outer cover; if you use wood inner covers w entrance that would be good too for upper entrance. During the winter though, think of the warm moist air from the bees respiration (and CO2) and when it rises it will not condense on a cold surface, it will run down the sides of the hive. Not everyone uses an upper entrance during the winter. I glue popsicle sticks inside my covers, even on the foam, gives it a bit more ventilation.
    There is a recessed space under the cover where I could easily install a piece of foam board. Might be worth a comparison for the winter to run a group with outside insulation on top vs inside board vs both to see how they perform in reducing the condensation. I do see one downside----fairly sure my bees would attempt to destroy & remove the interior foam during the summer months but might be worth a look. As I replace covers, I believe that I will make one small notch on an end or side that is about 2 bees wide to provide additional venting space.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Delhi, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,486

    Default Re: Wintering loss Survey

    Western Catskill Mountains
    Proverbs 16:24

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, NJ, USA
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Wintering loss Survey

    I went into winter with thirteen and 12 made it. The one that I lost was my own fault, for not preventing the winter wrap from blocking all ventilation holes. Why low loss? Last season I used apivar from April to June and them again in September through mid november.
    I also did an OAV in November. Otherwise, it would have been a disaster if I didn't treat.

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