Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business.. - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 34 of 34
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Interesting info about the insurance. I'll have to look into that some more. I'll talk to my agent and see If they have anything top offer. Look around locally aswell.

    I do build my own boxes for the most part but have had a hard time finding inexpensive wood. I got some rough cut pine last year that i had to dry and plane. I also tried some hemlock. Where do you find cost effective wood for deeps? Seems to be about 12 or14 for a box finish grade and im cutting box joints with my table saw and jig. I can get 5 commercial grade deeps for 69 down the road. Thought about a band saw but that's about of time.

    I picked up a 8frm manual spinner last year prob will get a 20 at some point.

    I also did a mid season extraction to free up supers. I like to have several varieties top offer add well.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    I would plane only one side of the wood intended for boxes. Bees appear to do very well with rough interiors that they can smooth out with propolis.

    Re Property taxes: At the most basic level, you need to have seven acres and you need to gross at least $10K per year from the agricultural operation. A start-up can gross the $10K in a single year and be eligible the following tax year. On an ongoing basis, however, the farm must gross an average of $10K over the previous two years. In certain bad weather circumstances this can waived if certified by Cooperative Extension.

    For smaller parcels (less than seven acres) the annual gross sales requirement is $50K. That's a lotta honey and nucs.

    The land that is clearly part of the farmstead (house, yard, driveway, etc.) is not included in the area of the proposed ag operation, so in practice a few acres are subtracted from the total acreage of the plot for the purposes of meeting the 7-acre requirement. (Unless, of course, there is no residence on the property.)

    If you have a written, 5-year contract, you can also rent other agricultural land and extend your ag exemption for property taxes to the landowner. It is not clear to me whether you could rent enough acres to make up the 7-acre requirement if you don't already own sufficient acreage to meet it on your own. This is a bit of gray area, particularly where bees are concerned. I do know that a start-up farmer can own no acres, but rent a farm that meets the acreage requirement (and meets the gross sales). The property tax exemption would benefit the land-owner, however.

    Re bees: they are undoubtedly eligible as an agricultural operation if the gross sales threshold is being met. However, unlike other crops or farm animals, they don't "use" or "occupy" much land themselves. But they do use vast acreage beyond their apiary (several thousands of acres). For instance on my large farm they "use" all of the fields, and woods to make honey. As well as all the land surrounding me. If I was running a commercial apiary and making 10K, I could make an argument that it was all "bee pasture". In theory I could then "rent" all of my neighbors' land and extend my property tax exemption to them as long as they left their fields fallow for my bees to gather nectar and propolis. (The ag exemption can also include up to 50 acres of supporting woodlot, but I would use up that amount pretty much on my own.) As it happens I am surrounded by other working farms, so nearly all of the land is already assessed for agricultural purposes on its own, so there would be no point in doing this. I think your town tax assessor might think you were pulling a fast one if you were "renting" additional lands to meet the acreage requirement. However, if you rented additional land, and specifically improved it to make it more useful just for bees, you could probably make a case for that. For instance, if you plow and planted cover crops for the bees, that would make the land arguably more of an agricultural "operation."

    This is a link to a useful publication from NYS, which lays out the whole program, down to very detailed instructions for assessors on how to qualify and calculate the potential exemptions. http://https://www.tax.ny.gov/resear...g_overview.htm

    The first thing is to discover if you are already in a certified Ag District, which smooths the process out. (If not, attaining an Ag Exemption is a bit tougher, but still doable.) You can discover that from your County Soil and Water District, which I think is in Greenwich, on RT 40, just north of the Hannaford.

    They can also advise you about your soil classifications (these are small fractions of the total land you own which have differing soil qualities) and how they are calculated for the purposes of the ag exemption. It seems odd if the ag operation is one like beekeeping which doesn't till, or deal with the soil at all. But that's how it works. Land with high quality soil that would be more productive receives a different rate of exemption per acre than land with poorer quality soil. After the ag value is calculated (this is process is complex, but governed by strict rules set by the State) then that number is compared with your current assessment, and if the ag value of the land is less than what you are currently being assessed for, then your assessment is reduced to the lower value. (This is quite likely to be the case.) This in effect makes your property less valuable for the purposes of real estate and school taxes, so you will pay less. Depending on what you are assessed for now, this may not be a lot less. But the only way to know is to start the process and see. The date for completing it (and the annual renewal of it) is March 1st ("Taxable status date"). Once you start you have to keep it up, or start again. If you abandon the operation, but don't irrevocably change the land, for instance, whack it up into housing lots, the exemption sunsets on the first succeeding March 1st. If you do "convert" the land there is a penalty of 5 times the value of the exemption received in the last year of eligibility.

    Now, as far as school tax rebate for farming operations: this is a different deal. It requires calculation of your gross income (including all non-farm) for the year, then doing some fairly complicated accounting gymnastics to work out whether you make roughly 30% (or more) of your total income from a qualified farming occupation (and only your own bees' production and nuc sales counts for this). If you meet the 30% test, then you can get a NYS income tax credit equal to the amount of school taxes you paid on the farm-related share of your school tax bill. In general terms, that means if you sold say, $20K of honey and bees (but not bee equipment, which is not farming), your total overall income from all sources with need to be less than about $75K. And if you file jointly, your spouse's income counts towards the total, too, even if she/he would would prefer to approach every bee with a flyswatter. These complications are intended to weed out the people with "real" farming plans, intentions, and incomes (however modest that income is) from hobby-farmers, or landowners who own farm-able land, but aren't planning to do anything other than farm the tax system. However, since this benefit comes in the form of a NYS tax credit, not just an income deduction, it can be quite valuable and perhaps worth the time to pursue. I have probably over-simplified it here, so your accountant should weigh in. I think, but I do not know for certain, that up at Farm Credit East in Greenwich (opposite the Fairgrounds) they may provide accounting fee-for-service for farming operations to help make the calculations. You could call and ask.

    If you want to wrap your own head around the topic, the instructions are here:https://www.tax.ny.gov/pdf/current_forms/it/it217i.pdf

    The forms are here: https://www.tax.ny.gov/pdf/current_f...17_fill_in.pdf

    And the overview (which is sketchy, but provides links to instructions and forms if you are not an individual, but a farming Corp (C or S) or a partnership.) Links above assumed you were an individual. It also details the record keeping requirements needed by everybody: https://www.tax.ny.gov/pit/credits/f...school_tax.htm

    BTW, the NYS school tax credit does not reduce the amount of money the local school district gets, it is funded separately from state funds. You pay the full amount in September, then you get the credit when you file your taxes the following year.

    If you were actively farming your bees, you could write off the cost of the bear attack and the installation of the fence. And if you are a business, you can also get a sales tax exemption on some of your bees expenses: anything you will resell (and thus capture the sales tax on, eventually, such as queens to put in nucs) or things which are used up, or become integral parts of the product you produce( i.e. winter patty or Jester nucs boxes that go out the door with the nucs). It does not make all your bee/farm expenses tax exempt, though.

    Hope that Big Bad Bear has already moved on. As far as I know he hasn't molested yards in Eagle Bridge or Buskirk, yet.

    Nancy
    Last edited by enjambres; 03-30-2019 at 11:42 AM.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Thanks Nancy looks like I have a lot of homework to do now I have to look into aquiring more land as i fall into to 50k bracket currently. I plan to make some $ to put in the vacation fund and towards the kids college in the next few years hopefully. Paying just shy of 8k for my seccond mortgage I mean school and property tax so certainly would like to be able to drop that some.

    Bear hasnt visited yet but lots of places said 1 week so thats tonight.. I'll keep you posted. My fault really in the ne you need 2 batteries so you can swap them out.

    Got everything cleaned up I can salvaged and the stinky bear drool washed off. Now I have to readjust my plans for the season being down a couple hives but thats ok.

    I saw some white pollen coming intoday. First I have seen of the season. Maple looks to be a week or 2 out. Howa things looking your way asfar as forage?

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    I saw pollen today for the first time today, too, light almost-white, creamy pollen. My bees were super excited about it. I threw on some more winter patty and started Global pollen patty today, too. It could be skunk cabbage, but it's more likely to be willow pollen.

    I have friends outside of Buskirk, and their yard has an electric fence that was unfortunately being upgraded and so not live this past week. I knew they were away, so I have been really fretting about that bear. Since I haven't heard any cry for help, I am assuming their hives are OK. I think that at this season the bears are moving out of hibernation (and hungry as, well, bears) so perhaps more likely to keep on the go, and away from your place. I hope you are safe tonight. I know my friends were planning on fixing the fence today. I, of course, have no fence so I am living dangerously. My husband's cousin, who has a farm near mine, delights in sending me pictures of bears seen on his game cams....

    Time to open the windows so I will hear the motion detectors and can fly down to my hives, shrieking like a mad woman.

    Who knew bear saliva was stinky???? They should brush more often!

    If you can persuade someone to sell you another five acres adjoining your property, that would do the trick, allowing for a couple of acres to be disqualified for the homestead portion. In the meantime, go to Soil and Water and get your soil map and find out if you're in a certified Ag District, etc. The additional 5 acres will not usually add much to your tax burden, it's the homestead and the first few acres that expensive, tax-wise. My husband and I choose not to rent our land to get the tax exemption from another farmer, but we groan about it every year. And your taxes in Wash. Co., are lower than ours here in Rens. Co.

    Nancy

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,406

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Madsen View Post
    I ran the numbers this year, that did not cover the cost of beekeeping insurance ~$400 for the policy I found.

    I found my beekeeping insurance quote through Citadel Insurance Services based on a web search.
    www.citadelus.com

    hear were the terms for 3 hives:
    COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY

    Coverage Limits
    . . .
    Medical Expense Limit (any one person) $ 5,000
    . . .
    Deductible per Claim including loss adjustment expense and defense costs $ 250
    Keep looking around, but few people insure bee operations. I know of 3 companies that regularly do it, and their coverage limits and prices are all comparable. But I'm not sure you get much actual benefit.

    Take this policy for example. Cost is $414 /yr. Your deductible is $250. Meaning you're out of pocket $664 before they pay anything. But your highest risk of loss is personal injury (someone getting stung or someone getting sick off your honey). You have very low odds of having any contract or non-personal injury tort based claims against you. So if you do get a claim for personal injury, the limit they'll pay is $5k. One sting and a medivac airlift and you've well exceeded that cost. So the insurance company pays the $5k and walks away, so you can pay the rest. So if the claim was $40,000, the insurance company pays their limit and you pay $35,664.

    Not much benefit when you run the math.

    My homeowner's insurance has $400k of personal injury coverage and a $500 deductible, just to compare policies, but they won't cover "business operations."

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Central PA, USA
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in PA View Post
    Following and very interested in the answers. - following too - Less than a handful of events and word-of-mouth sales would be plenty for me.
    Because forum members are from various states, I'm responding mostly with tips on getting started when you decide to go into profit-making activities. Every locale and state are different. For example ...

    In PA, once you go beyond word-of-mouth sales into advertising or marketing, you have to get a license. For us, keeping bees as part of a backyard hobby farm is enough. We can sell fresh veggies without a license and have the honey "available for purchase" then.

    If you visit the website for your state's Dept of Agriculture (search Apiary license, Honey, Mead) and Extension Office (Many free documents to download or have mailed), you will be amazed at the helpful info and workshops they provide!!! Also, your state's Dept of Community & Economic Development has helpful info on home businesses, links to Small Business Development courses (free to low cost; SBD does excellent job explaining LLC, sole-proprietor and other options plus insurance, etc), etc. The IRS.gov site has documents to download about the when it's a biz or hobby, when it's a farm, what counts as a home biz & percentage you can deduct, etc. At one point, I had an Ag license for home canning/preservation of products like salsas. I keep my Sales & Use Tax Reporting current, so no questions ask if I occasionally sell stuff without a local event permit. EVERYTHING I needed to learn and do was online.

    At the workshops by Ag or SBD, presenters were very helpful and truly want businesses to thrive. I was lucky that my Ag inspector was supportive and helpful. PA Ag's Apiary department also join training events hosted by local beekeepers associations, another good reason to join one.

    So when you are ready to take the next step, you can participate in workshops to talk to a human, then access and complete all the "cover your butt" paperwork (from local to federal) level in 3 to 6 months. And... if you don't want the alcohol hassles mentioned in this thread, like my son does you can make mead for fun and gifts.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Williamsport, PA
    Posts
    558

    Default

    You just hit on most of my frustration. I stopped at the local AG office and got zero help other than a business card to, "Call me if you have any questions" Duh, that's why I went to the office and I knew more than them already.

    My biggest concern is liability. I can't get much information there either. I would rather not call my agent and risk getting my homeowner's insurance cancelled. Nobody else has been any help including my financial advisor who said, "Yeah, you need liability insurance". Am I a small farm or small business?

    I attended a beekclub meeting my 1st year and they seemed more concerned with using the proper Latin for bee anatomy and trying to get published in a journal. I didn't return for a 2nd meeting.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN (Rutherford Co)
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    From my gathered knowledge, it's better to focus on selling bees or honey, not both.

    Make your label/packaging as attractive as possible and sell for the highest amount you can get.

    Don't be a jerk to your bees and rob them so much that they must eat sugar.

    Treat it like a business, but don't go into debt or over-extend yourself. You will NOT get rich selling honey or bees or equipment. You might blow all of your disposable income. Stuff happens, especially in agriculture, which is what you're asking to get into. Expect setbacks. Some people have had 100 hives die one year. Vandalism. Theft. Disease. Stuff happens in nature, and by creating a "business" out of nature, you should expect natural results.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in PA View Post
    You just hit on most of my frustration. I stopped at the local AG office and got zero help other than a business card to, "Call me if you have any questions" Duh, that's why I went to the office and I knew more than them already.

    My biggest concern is liability. I can't get much information there either. I would rather not call my agent and risk getting my homeowner's insurance cancelled. Nobody else has been any help including my financial advisor who said, "Yeah, you need liability insurance". Am I a small farm or small business?
    .
    Hi Steve,
    Start looking in small stores or at Markets or online for jars of honey from PA. Call, email ,reach out to these companys who are folks who have a current small business with bees, and ask if they would offer some assistance to you. If you can talk to someone who has walked the walk you will be in a better place to make decisions. I "almost" opened a restaurant, I ended up asking 8-10 owners for an hour of their time 3 agreed and spent an hour over coffee. Once I got the big picture I did not open the restaurant. Optimally you need to have a chat with 2-5 bee professionals in PA and find out what is needed and what they have done for their business. Hopefully they will not see you as a threat to their business. In a pinch if it feels that way tell the honey guy you want to sell NUCs and the NUC seller you want to sell honey. the related insurance and pitfalls would still be valuable to know. If you are job optional go work for one for a month or 2. I would strive to find the person who is doing what you want and pick his or her brain a bit. Ask them all about insurance they carry.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,406

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in PA View Post
    My biggest concern is liability. I can't get much information there either. I would rather not call my agent and risk getting my homeowner's insurance cancelled. Nobody else has been any help including my financial advisor who said, "Yeah, you need liability insurance". Am I a small farm or small business?
    Call a few insurance agents (other than your homeowner's insurance agent) and ask to talk. Open ABJ or BC and you'll find 2 or 3 companies that specialize in bee insurance. Go visit a Farm Bureau agent and talk to them. They'll tell you what insurance they can provide and what they think you need. Take the quote with you and think about whether the coverage is right, and the price makes sense.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,406

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Quote Originally Posted by PepperBeeMan View Post
    From my gathered knowledge
    I hate to be that guy, but I disagree with almost everything you said.

    Quote Originally Posted by PepperBeeMan View Post
    it's better to focus on selling bees or honey, not both.
    I wouldn't do that if I were you. Diversify your income stream. Sell honey and nucs. Don't pigeon hole yourself into one area or another. It makes no sense.

    Plus, when you sell nucs, your honey sales increase. All those first time beekeepers that realize keeping bees isn't that easy will want honey when they don't get it the first year. And they'll buy from you.

    Quote Originally Posted by PepperBeeMan View Post
    Make your label/packaging as attractive as possible and sell for the highest amount you can get.
    The opposite works much better in my experience. When I started seriously selling honey (not just to neighbors and relatives) I wanted to go with a professional bottle, label, design and packaging. I got the high end plastic jars with no drip lids. I paid a graphic design artist to come up with a very good logo, label, and packaging material. I paid for premium, waterproof vying labels. I even got nutritional information and contents put on the jars. I take pride in my honey, and I wanted the customer to know it. I wanted the customer to understand that I wasn't a guy in overalls scooping honey into jars and putting it on my porch.

    You know what my customers told me? They didn't want any of that stuff. They didn't want the fancy label, the fancy jar, the premium lid, the nutritional information . . . they wanted honey in a mason jar. A small logo on top that tells them it came from a bee farm, and they are happy as a clam. I didn't listen at first, and thought the customer was wrong. I was selling a premium product, not mason jars of honey. But they kept asking. Repeatedly. So finally I gave in, and put both my "premium" jars next to mason jars. And you know what? The mason jars outsell the "premium" jars 5 to 1. One customer told me if they wanted fancy labels and jars, they'd go to the grocery store. They want honey that looks like the beekeeper packaged it themselves. Which is why they take the drive to my stand just for the honey. They want to pull a mason jar out, have their friend ask where they got it, and tell them from the beekeeper "down the street." If it has a fancy label on it, they don't get that wow factor. Their friend doesn't ask where they got it, and the customer doesn't feel special. Who knew.

    I'm also not a fan of charging the highest amount you can get. I started off pricing my honey based on what the national average was. I sold out. I increased my prices a few dollars since then, more to account for inflation. Many of my customers tell me that I sell for too cheap ($8 lb, $11 for a pint, $20 for a quart). I ask them if they think it's a good deal, and they tell me it is. So I tell them to tell their friends. I'm in it for the beekeeping, not to retire early. The customer always smiles at that, and they tell their friends. Repeat business comes, and I don't have to hold onto inventory. My product moves fast, which increases demand. People buy more because they know it's limited. Then I can increase another dollar without impacting my sales. If I started off selling at $20 /lb I wouldn't have the referral business I have now. I'd still be holding onto product. And I know that because some other beekeepers in the area ARE still holding onto last year's honey because they were trying to sell at $20 /lb. My customers would rather wait till my harvest comes in than buy from them, because they like the story, they like the beekeeper, not the economics of it all.

    Maybe I'd make more money if I sold for a higher price at the start. Maybe not if you account for the decreased volume, and the increased work it would take me to move the product (with fewer referrals). Who knows. But I'm VERY happy with my pricing decisions.

    Quote Originally Posted by PepperBeeMan View Post
    Don't be a jerk to your bees and rob them so much that they must eat sugar.
    The economics of it all say that's false. I can buy sugar cheaper than I can sell honey. And bees overwinter on sugar stores just as well (and in some studies actually better than fall flow nectar). I don't recommend robbing so much you kill the colony, but I wouldn't worry about "being a jerk" or taking too much. My bees have never complained, and my overwinter rates beat every other local beekeeper that keeps half the honey on "because it's the right thing to do."

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    2,643

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Specialkayme makes a great point in post #25 about the insurance - you have to look at the policy they are offering and do the math. It either makes sense to buy or it does not.

    I was talking about when you need a flatbed truck that is declared a business vehicle that must be insured to drive it, then you'll probably want the additional corporate veil protection if you have any assets like a home, other vehicles that are personal vehicles not in the business, bank accounts, stock holdings - you'll want those separated and legally protected. There are lawyers who specialize in piercing corporate veil, and they win sometimes. Talk to such a lawyer and set it up for defense against such attacks.

    When I was contracting, my license was in one corporation that rented the tools and trucks from "someone else" (another corporation). It kept less than $5,000 in a business checking account most of the time. I personally kept very little assets on paper. My personal bank accounts were at a different bank. The accounting was always entirely consistent, with very traceable, transparent, GAAP consistent entries. I'd stay up late journalizing reciepts and posting to the ledger. My work was very dangerous, and I was extremely skilled at making sure that bad things did not happen. You could sue me, but no way was it going to be worth an attorney's half-hour. You could go after me in small claims, but all you'd collect were a desk, a chair, a pad of paper, a few pens, and a copy of my books, not much more.

    Beekeeping is much less likely to have a serious mishap, but you do have a truck accident to insure against, possibly a sensitive person getting massively stung.

    As far as going into debt, beginners should avoid it. I could be sitting on a medium-sized fortune with the read I had last fall, had I gone in to debt to start a bee business. My main biological indicators said, "Get ready for LOTS of rain!" I knew in August that this would be a phenomenal year, and the rain has come, every thing is growing like crazy and here come the flowers.

    Unfortunately, the Thomas fire left me too low in finances to take advantage of it. I started keeping bees in 2007, and have a few miles under my belt. I'll work for other beekeepers or at some other job for a few years and continue building beehive parts, storing them for when I can afford to get back into it. Then, with an apiary already started and plenty of wooden ware stored up and ready to throw into action, and several business advantages built-in to the operation, I am not afraid of debt because of the money I'll make on it, but that will only happen on a year when I see a good rain is coming. Debt or debt-free is just a math decision same as insurance.

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    havana fl
    Posts
    1,400

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Quote Originally Posted by Specialkayme View Post
    I'd be careful following this advice, if you've summarized it correctly. You can expense the woodenware costs just as well as a d/b/a as you can as an LLC/Inc. Plus, there is no difference between the "LLC route" and the "C corp or S corp" route.

    Corporations (Inc.'s) are created through Articles of Incorporation. When they set up their tax filings, they can be filed as a corporation (C Corp) or have flow through taxation (S Corp, if they qualify). LLC's can elect to be taxed as partnerships or corporations. If taxed as a partnership, they get flow through taxation. If taxed as a corporation, they can still choose to be taxed as a true corporation (C Corp) or as a flow through taxed entity (S Corp). Rarely do LLC's elect to be taxed as a corporation, then make the S election, as they could just be taxed as a partnership in the first place.

    All if this means nothing if the company is owned by a single individual (or married couple). In that instance the IRS treats the company as a "disregarded entity" and it files a Schedule C, the same as a d/b/a would. That's true if it was an LLC or an Inc (C or S). You can choose to file a separate return, but I don't know you would.

    Be careful taking legal advice from a CPA. I've seen it go wrong often enough to mention it repeatedly.
    When I was ready to sell honey I got in touch with a cpa and I decided to set up an s corp I also do some sub contracting construction and that all goes through the corp my wife's income all gets mixed in so I guess that's the flow through tax entity. All lumber for hives saws drills gas extractors jars new smoker vail jars did I mention JARS are all Expenses if some one gets sick from honey they don't get my house. Had my property rezoned ag from residential so I get a tax break on 9 of the 10 acres honey is food and there is no sales tax on food in Fl I still use this cpa to do my taxes wife sets up everything in a spread sheet and he does the filling. I like it
    Last edited by mac; 04-06-2019 at 09:02 AM. Reason: addition
    Iím really not that serious

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,406

    Default Re: Beekeeping as a business. lets talk business..

    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    if some one gets sick from honey they don't get my house.
    They never would have anyway. Look up your state's exemption laws. Assuming you live in Florida, you have very liberal exemption laws, especially as it relates to your homestead (unlimited homestead exemption).

    Most people live within their exemption amounts anyway, and get little additional protection from incorporating. Unless its very high risk (like kilocharlie's business), or you have substantial assets that aren't liened against (mortgage, car loan).

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •