trap placement
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: trap placement

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Lilburn, GA, USA
    Posts
    652

    Question trap placement

    Hi, y'all,

    I'm getting more and more turned on to the idea of trying to catch swarms, especially because I can see bees (not mine) visiting some of my old boxes, so I know there are some feral hives nearby that like to visit my yard.

    I was thinking of placing a couple in my yard and others some distance away in the woods by the river.

    I was going to put one near the tree that my bees swarmed on to last May. I would love to put it ON the tree, but the tree is in my neighbor's yard. This may end up being a prop up on the fence, or hang from the fence, or possibly hang from a branch that reaches into our yard.

    The other I was going to put on a large cherry tree that has a forked trunk, because I read elsewhere that bees really notice these forked trunks.

    Also, I'm not sure when to get started with this. March? April?

    Thanks,
    Thomas
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    1,890

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by Yunzow View Post
    Hi, y'all,
    ...Also, I'm not sure when to get started with this. March? April?

    Thanks,
    Thomas
    The timing is a question for your local folk, Thomas.
    The locations - for sure have a trap or two near each of your existing yard.
    Bees will come attracted by the smell of your yard.
    Active yard is a best attractant.
    Of course, a stack of used boxes is another best attractant - have a trap setup right there.
    Otherwise, google up the tips and videos - lots of opinions.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by Yunzow View Post
    Hi, y'all,

    Also, I'm not sure when to get started with this. March? April?
    You can put up traps right now. In your area, the earliest swarms might appear in March. Too early is better than too late.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    2,800

    Default Re: trap placement

    Agreed! Here in the South, it has been a relatively mild winter. Based on how fast my bees are brooding up, I expect swarm season to start early. My plan is to get some of the traps placed this weekend and continue getting locations through March. Like Chis said, " too early is better than too late."
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    9,785

    Default Re: trap placement

    i see lilburn is just a bit north of atlanta. watch the 'post your swarm dates' thread and you'll see the first swarms reported down on the gulf coast and work their way north. probably about a month or so away from your location. could be sooner if a beekeeper near by is feeding syrup.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Lilburn, GA, USA
    Posts
    652

    Default Re: trap placement

    Sweet, thanks for the tips. I'm going to build some traps this weekend and start putting them up.
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

  8. #7

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by Yunzow View Post
    I can see bees (not mine) visiting some of my old boxes, so I know there are some feral hives nearby that like to visit my yard.
    How can you tell that they are feral?
    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. - Emerson

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    1,890

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    How can you tell that they are feral?
    You can not definitely tell.

    However, IF you notice them to be smaller bees - that is a good sign and has feral potential.
    Clearly large bees will be likely commercials.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  10. #9

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    However, IF you notice them to be smaller bees - that is a good sign and has feral potential.
    It has never been obvious to me.
    I tried small cell some years ago....and when I looked at those bees I believed them to be smaller. Yet when I caught swarms near yards with a mix of conventional and small cell I simply couldn't distinguish which they came from.
    I'm sure your eyes and mind are more finely tuned than mine...but I suspect that the average beekeeper would never see the difference. I certainly cannot.
    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. - Emerson

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    1,890

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    ....and when I looked at those bees I believed them to be smaller. Yet when I caught swarms near yards with a mix of conventional and small cell I simply couldn't distinguish which they came from.
    Well, when I see a swarm with uniformly large, commercial bee from 5.4 foundation, I will tell you exactly that.
    The uniformity in numbers is very obvious. These bees are like from a large, standard cookie cutter.
    So - uniform, large, commercial bees coming of a conventional LC foundation - are pretty easy to pick out.

    Any other bees are not as easy to tell.
    Foundation-less bees are more natural in that there is a mix of various bee sizes in a single swarm.
    This is natural and normal.
    It will be hard to tell what they are (feral or not feral).

    I am yet to see true SC bees. I don't have SC bees and will likely never have SC bees; no plans for SC.
    It is logical to assume some uniformity in SC foundation bees, I guess.

    So, pretty much if you see a swarm with non-uniform, mixed bees, there is a better chance these could be feral.
    Cookie cutter, standard bees are just not natural (either big or small).

    Two of my swarms last year were most definitely large, standard commercial bees (one turned out to be a total waste of time; the other is a question mark still).
    The other two swarms for me were less obviously commercial (probably, but not at all obvious).
    Last edited by GregV; 03-01-2019 at 10:21 AM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    9,785

    Default Re: trap placement

    i use some foundationless frames to flank a frame of drawn comb in my swarm traps. over the years i have accumulated several frames of naturally drawn comb. the cells in the middle of the brood frames tend to get drawn at about 5.1 mm as compared to the 5.4 mm on the rite cell plastic foundation that i use.

    it is possible to see a noticeable difference in bee size when you have hives side by side utilizing the different size cells.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    Well, when I see a swarm with uniformly large, commercial bee from 5.4 foundation, I will tell you exactly that.
    The uniformity in numbers is very obvious. These bees are like from a large, standard cookie cutter.
    So - uniform, large, commercial bees coming of a conventional LC foundation - are pretty easy to pick out.
    ...
    So, pretty much if you see a swarm with non-uniform, mixed bees, there is a better chance these could be feral.
    Cookie cutter, standard bees are just not natural (either big or small).
    Gregv,

    I have looked at one or two bee swarms and had that intuition that they might be feral. I couldn't say why. I think I have focused mostly on color.

    "Non-uniform" bees. This is a great insight. I am going pay close attention this year, and put this to the test.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    1,890

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by clong View Post
    Gregv,

    I have looked at one or two bee swarms and had that intuition that they might be feral. I couldn't say why. I think I have focused mostly on color.

    "Non-uniform" bees. This is a great insight. I am going pay close attention this year, and put this to the test.
    Color would not be a good predictor in a generally chaotic USA situation.

    The mixed bee sizing, however, suggests a natural comb.
    Natural comb, in turn, suggest better feral source possibility.

    PS: yes, I know, there are cases of neglected, foundation-based hives that essentially turn in to the ferals after X years of neglect;
    when left in place for years, even standard commercial foundation slowly turns into a non-uniform comb with variety of cell sizes (and the bees become non-uniform).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Bath, Maine, United States
    Posts
    2,184

    Default Re: trap placement

    I would love to put it ON the tree, but the tree is in my neighbor's yard.

    Just curious. What happened to that swarm. Swarm (not mine) that landed on the neighbors, they were more than happy to have me remove them.

    Can you sell the idea the best way to keep a swarm from their land is to put the trap on their tree?
    It is not true that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks.
    They can learn them, they just can't do them.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    1,890

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by Saltybee View Post
    Can you sell the idea the best way to keep a swarm from their land is to put the trap on their tree?
    The best time and place for this sale is when you remove an actual swarm for people.
    Right then and there - they will likely to say YES.

    Otherwise, people are not receptive to some abstract ideas, IMO.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    1,890

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    .. the cells in the middle of the brood frames tend to get drawn at about 5.1 mm as compared to the 5.4 mm on the rite cell plastic foundation that i use.
    Heh, so the bees in your area do want ~5.1mm cell; I will take this into the survey.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Lilburn, GA, USA
    Posts
    652

    Default Re: trap placement

    It's true, I don't know. They might belong to a nearby sideliner or such. But I think there is a good chance they are feral.
    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    How can you tell that they are feral?
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Dallas, GA, USA
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    The best time and place for this sale is when you remove an actual swarm for people.
    Right then and there - they will likely to say YES.

    Otherwise, people are not receptive to some abstract ideas, IMO.
    Assuming you have a pretty good raport with your neighbor, just ask if you can strap it to the tree for a couple months. It is a realistic argument to have them collect there quickly rather than hang out on the hood of their car for a day.

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: trap placement

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    The timing is a question for your local folk, Thomas.
    The locations - for sure have a trap or two near each of your existing yard.
    Bees will come attracted by the smell of your yard.
    Active yard is a best attractant.
    Of course, a stack of used boxes is another best attractant - have a trap setup right there.
    Otherwise, google up the tips and videos - lots of opinions.

    I see you suggest a trap near an existing active colony, or at least that is how I interpret it...

    Is there a minimum distance from existing boxes that a trap can be place?...

    If it's too close, will it effect the existing colony?...

    Thanks...1/33rd

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Red Bud, IL, USA
    Posts
    1,724

    Default Re: trap placement

    How can you tell that they are feral?
    (tongue in cheek) We have open range bees in my area, if they're not branded or ear tagged they're feral!
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •