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Thread: Grub Killer?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Landing, NJ, USA
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    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Japanese beetles are invaders unknown in North America before the early 1900s, so eliminating them only sets the balance back to where it was then. If that makes the area less desirable to the moles then perhaps they will move elsewhere thus avoiding the traps, poison, and apparently explosions which might otherwise await them.

    Milky spore is specific to Japanese Beetle and is not a broad spectrum grub killer.

    Bill

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
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    1,851

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Quote Originally Posted by elmer_fud View Post
    I vote for this method

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0Hx5ka1FiA

    (from Caddyshack)
    One of my favorite movies, Bill Murray was great, but the groundhog was best!
    Proverbs 16:24

  4. #23
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    Mar 2015
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    Tehachapi, California, USA
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    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidgeBees View Post
    Just curious if any of you use grub killer in your yards and if so, which are the safe ones? We have tons of moles so I figured if I kill the grubs I can get rid of the moles since my mole traps and baits arent working.
    Grubs are invasive. Moles are native. If you plan to eliminate the grubs do it with absolute care because some of the pesticides can also kill off your hives especially if it is spread during bloom and the pesticide is carried into the hives on the bees pollen sacs. Read the labels! Also google benefits of moles.
    Good luck.

  5. #24

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    I applied milky spore to my land the summer before last. I had lots of japanese beetles and lots of moles. I didn't seem to have nearly as many this past summer. I think this next summer will tell the tale, it usually takes about that long, from what I understand.

  6. #25

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    NZ here. Biological control for grubs still wins hands down. When we moved into our present home about 25 years ago, grass grubs had pretty much destroyed the lawns. I built some starling boxes - https://www.bto.org/sites/default/fi...ng-nestbox.pdf - and attached them under the eaves upstairs. In two seasons, the starlings, which have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, had solved the grub problem and it was fun for the children to watch them.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Gore, Oklahoma, USA
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    8

    Smile Re: Grub Killer?

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidgeBees View Post
    Just curious if any of you use grub killer in your yards and if so, which are the safe ones? We have tons of moles so I figured if I kill the grubs I can get rid of the moles since my mole traps and baits arent working.
    Search for "beneficial nematodes". They are bought as eggs (small as dust) that can be mixed with water and sprayed onto the ground around the hives and trees (I use it on my plum and peach trees to control borers). The ground must be kept moist for a few days to hatch the eggs and allow the tiny nematodes to start burrowing towards the smell of grubworms and other ground dwelling larvae. When they find one, the hungry nematodes begin burrowing into the host, feeding until it has it's fill. The nematode moults, mates and lays more eggs creating a growing population of the hungry nematodes.

    I recommend that you read about the grub-controlling nematodes and purchase your supply before they are run out.

    Heterorhabditis bacteriophora $42 and change for 10 Million nematodes.v

    https://www.arbico-organics.com/prod...-bacteriophora

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Summerville, SC, USA
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    2

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    We have also used Milky Spore here is SC for the Japanese beetle grubs around a lot of roses. Learned about it from P. Alllen Smith, Moss Mountain Farm in ARK when we visited there. In our climate where we don't have a deep freeze, we have applied it several times a year; now after 3 years, we rarely see any beetles. My hives are about 100ft from some of the roses, and have never had any issues with their health.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Gore, Oklahoma, USA
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    8

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Quote Originally Posted by herbandhive View Post
    We have also used Milky Spore here is SC for the Japanese beetle grubs around a lot of roses. Learned about it from P. Alllen Smith, Moss Mountain Farm in ARK when we visited there. In our climate where we don't have a deep freeze, we have applied it several times a year; now after 3 years, we rarely see any beetles. My hives are about 100ft from some of the roses, and have never had any issues with their health.
    Milky Spore is an excellent grub control. I have used it for over 20 years in gardens and flowerbeds. It enlarges its boundaries as it attacks and kills grubs in the soil. Within a month of it's use in a pecan orchard adjacent to my house, I was finding dead and decomposing grubs on the opposite side of the house. My mole problem went away as fast as the grubs did.

    I use a variety of nematodes for grub control near my beehives, in the vegetable garden and in the peach orchard striving for, but never quite making perfect control of the pests.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
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    138

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Thanks everyone, the nemotodes sound interesting. May be worth a shot. Since they burrow into larvae and other things could they potentially help with SHB or still no? If so, should I worry about them infesting a SHB while in the ground and then the SHB getting into my hive or is that not possible?

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
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    138

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Quote Originally Posted by tkishkape View Post
    Search for "beneficial nematodes". They are bought as eggs (small as dust) that can be mixed with water and sprayed onto the ground around the hives and trees (I use it on my plum and peach trees to control borers). The ground must be kept moist for a few days to hatch the eggs and allow the tiny nematodes to start burrowing towards the smell of grubworms and other ground dwelling larvae. When they find one, the hungry nematodes begin burrowing into the host, feeding until it has it's fill. The nematode moults, mates and lays more eggs creating a growing population of the hungry nematodes.

    I recommend that you read about the grub-controlling nematodes and purchase your supply before they are run out.

    Heterorhabditis bacteriophora $42 and change for 10 Million nematodes.v

    https://www.arbico-organics.com/prod...-bacteriophora
    Would they survive winter and keep multiplying year after year or is this a 1 year deal?

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Gore, Oklahoma, USA
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    8

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidgeBees View Post
    Would they survive winter and keep multiplying year after year or is this a 1 year deal?
    Sure! They feed, molt, mate and reproduce just like other insects. They become motionless when the ground temperature rises above 90 degrees Fahrenheit but will reanimate in cooling temperatures. Colder temperatures just above freezing seem to be the boundary for hibernation until warmer temperatures.

    It is recommended to reapply to reinforce the population of active nematodes according to the website.

  13. #32
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    Jul 2016
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
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    138

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    Quote Originally Posted by tkishkape View Post
    Sure! They feed, molt, mate and reproduce just like other insects. They become motionless when the ground temperature rises above 90 degrees Fahrenheit but will reanimate in cooling temperatures. Colder temperatures just above freezing seem to be the boundary for hibernation until warmer temperatures.

    It is recommended to reapply to reinforce the population of active nematodes according to the website.
    Thanks, I may go this route. I wish we could watch them go to work, it sounds fun haha

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Frankston, Victoria, AU
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    15

    Default Re: Grub Killer?

    i use chickens

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