How to insulate long hives?
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,144

    Default How to insulate long hives?

    This keeps coming up, so here is my typical setup.
    The follower boards are essential (preferably foam sandwich, but anything is better than nothing).
    The roof typically has a poly insert fit under it to reduce upward radiation (1-2 inch, whatever I pull out of a contractor trash bin).
    20171029_162018.jpg
    20171029_162125.jpg
    20171029_162036.jpg
    NucWintering-2.jpg
    NucWintering.jpg
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,144

    Default Re: How to insulate long hives?

    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Fennville, Michigan
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: How to insulate long hives?

    How about insulation on the box itself?
    Do you build them with thicker lumber or insulated panels?

    I suppose with insulated follower boards the need to insulate the narrow sides is reduced, but what about the longer faces?


    My current plan is to insulate above the frames more thoroughly than the sides of the hive, but I do have insulation on the sides.
    IMG_20181103_183802_691.jpg
    I'm planning to put foam insulation throughout the gabled roof, and use cover cloths (and maybe a winter "quilt") above the bars.
    My boxes are made out of plywood, so I thought extra insulation would be beneficial due to the narrow walls.
    Though, I think even if I made them out of 2x lumber like Dr. Leo's plans, I would put some sort of insulation on the walls.


    this guy took insulation to a whole new level,
    https://www.starhouse-observatory.org/node/15
    with 3 1/2" of R13 insulation built into his double-walled hive.
    DSC05199.jpg


    Has anyone had experience using natural materials as insulation in a hive? like straw or wool?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,144

    Default Re: How to insulate long hives?

    Quote Originally Posted by nickhefferan View Post
    How about insulation on the box itself?
    Do you build them with thicker lumber or insulated panels?

    I suppose with insulated follower boards the need to insulate the narrow sides is reduced, but what about the longer faces?


    Has anyone had experience using natural materials as insulation in a hive? like straw or wool?
    I know exactly what you mean...
    The considerations:
    * IF you will "never" move the hive, you can essentially build a fridge and that will be the best approach, IMO;
    * IF you will move the hive, the excessive weight is a problem (my 20-frame thick lumber hive is a problem that way)
    * I have hives from 2x lumber and like them (minus the weight)
    * I have a single hive experiment with sandwich walls (but the final weight is about the same as 2x lumber because of construction plywood I used - it is very dense and heavy)
    * I have no access to free wool - hence so do not use it; dry swamp grass is a plenty around me but I don't want to bother (need to make big hives - too bulky for me)
    * what I posted on the pictures works just fine for me;
    * I *may* test putting heavy plastic film immediately onto the top bars as it holds the warm air better and I still get plenty of ventilation under/around the follower boards

    My issue is that I need to be mobile; 2x lumber/heavy sandwich are not good for mobile hives.

    Future direction for me I see as two possibilities so to combine mobility and good insulation in a single package:

    1)the long side is from 2x lumber;
    the short side is from the lightest possible material (1x lumber is OK; construction plywood is NOT OK - heavy);
    use the insulated follower boards parallel to the short side;

    2)the long side is from 1x lumber;
    the short side is from 1x lumber;
    use the insulated follower boards parallel to the short side;
    make the 1.25" frame side-bars nearly all way vertically and thus create a "double-wall" along the long side;
    the concerns about propolising frames to each other are mostly overblown as they typically glue only the upper 1/3-1/2 of the frame anyway (not all way top to the bottom);
    I have seen people doing wide and touching frame side-bars and there were no complaints
    Last edited by GregV; 02-13-2019 at 09:12 AM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •