death by suffocation? - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Sedgwick Co. KS
    Posts
    1,196

    Default Re: death by suffocation?

    My first year storing supers was a disaster because of wax moth. Since then I've been using Xentari to spray each frame with good results.....but, it is a big PITA. Being able to leave them on the hive and letting the bees guard them would be much easier, however I'm afraid the bees wouldn't be able to retain any heat during the winter with so much dead air space above them. And I'd let the QE on all winter to keep 'her majesty' from brooding up the supers.

    I experimented with wintering in a single deep with one colony this year. So far they appear to be in great shape. If they succeed in surviving, I'll try a few with empty supers on next winter.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    10,404

    Default Re: death by suffocation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim KS View Post
    My first year storing supers was a disaster because of wax moth. Since then I've been using Xentari to spray each frame with good results.....but, it is a big PITA.
    i use that product to spray the few frames of comb i use in my swarm traps. too much pita to do 40+ supers worth for sure


    Quote Originally Posted by Tim KS View Post
    Being able to leave them on the hive and letting the bees guard them would be much easier, however I'm afraid the bees wouldn't be able to retain any heat during the winter with so much dead air space above them.
    yes, letting the bees guard them is the rationale. surprisingly, the dead air space doesn't appear to be an issue with respect to the cluster keeping warm. i am further south than you, but we have our share of subfreezing temps through the winter months.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tim KS View Post
    And I'd let the QE on all winter to keep 'her majesty' from brooding up the supers.
    the risk is that if the cluster gets above the excluder for some reason the queen would get left behind, although one would think there would be no reason for the cluster to go up into completely empty supers.

    i'm into my hives long before the broodnest approaches the empty supers, but it's not an issue for me as i am encouraging the broodnest to expand up through the supers anyway by checkerboarding, opening the broodnest, and pyramiding.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tim KS View Post
    I experimented with wintering in a single deep with one colony this year. So far they appear to be in great shape. If they succeed in surviving, I'll try a few with empty supers on next winter.
    that's cool tim. the biggest pita for me is when i have a few dead outs and having to deal with the equipment until spring. it would be nice if i had a large walk in freezer that i could keep a lot of drawn comb in.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    810

    Default Re: death by suffocation?

    What did the dead frames of bees look like.
    Bees don't freeze to death, they starve to death.
    When was the last time you saw them alive?
    When did you treat for VD?
    Do you have some pictures of the frames of this dead out for us to see.... We can't just diagnose with out pictures.
    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    we made it up into the mid-sixties today and i made the rounds to observe the entrances for pollen coming in.

    homeyard - all good
    outyard - all good
    overflow yard - pollen coming in 2 out of 3 hives with no activity at all for the third hive.

    a closer look revealed the reduced entrance was clogged with bees

    an ear to the side of the hive and a couple of knocks revealed it had gone dead quiet. this hive had good pollen coming in the last time it got warm here and had strong cluster roar 3 days ago.

    the population was decent for this time of year with at about 3 deep frames worth of bees. there was capped brood about 6" in diameter occupying 2 adjacent frames in contact with honey.

    the screens over the notches on the front and back of my inner cover were completely propolized over. the bottom board had a solid layer of dead bees that was thicker toward the entrance.

    i'm guessing the co2 levels became toxic and all the bees died at once.

    i don't think i've ever been this bummed about losing a colony.

    i have reduced my entrances more this year as a hedge against robbing and have had to clear dead bees from some of them here and there over the winter. i also had previously noted that i needed to replace that inner cover for another one with fresh screens but didn't get around to it.

    dang.

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