Top Bar Hive Check on Groundhog Day
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Madisonville,TN
    Posts
    535

    Default Top Bar Hive Check on Groundhog Day

    I checked one of my top bars today. 62 degrees in East Tennessee! Maybe that rodent from Pennsylvania is right. Anyway, in the first picture there is a drone! He must have made it through the fall purge, or the girls are about three weeks early this year. Picture two shows some red and light yellow pollen, and the third picture is one of my bars upside down on the hive. This has been a great colony, I requeened it late summer with one of my local mutts I raised. Hope you enjoy the pictures, it won’t be long now! Hope everyone else is coming through winter.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Geauga, Ohio
    Posts
    409

    Default Re: Top Bar Hive Check on Groundhog Day

    thx for sharing! Awww, lucky, pollen! We _might_ see pollen late Feb but it won't be consistent. Nice looking cluster, I will check mine tmrw...we get excited about 50 degrees in these parts...

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Drexel, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Top Bar Hive Check on Groundhog Day

    I did my check today - 62 here near KC. They didn't survive the polar vortex lows we had here last week. There were a few capped frames of honey, but must not have been able to move to them.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Yakima Co, WA, USA
    Posts
    129

    Default Re: Top Bar Hive Check on Groundhog Day

    We are in the midst of a cold snap, so we'll see. A couple weeks ago they were flying around just great but we got 8" of snow yesterday and low temps, so...we'll see how it goes!
    Meghan

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Geauga, Ohio
    Posts
    409

    Default Re: Top Bar Hive Check on Groundhog Day

    For feedback on your bees and your management, you can check for mite pressure on a deadout. And you should...

    I do an alcohol wash on the dead bees that fell, http://scientificbeekeeping.com/an-i...a-mite-washer/ with 2 stacked cups like this site.

    I also check for evidence the mites reproduced in the hive - sometimes the mites were imported when the house bees went robbing. If the mites reproduced in the hive, they leave behind mite frass (or poop), which is white and tiny drops on the roof of the brood cell https://beeinformed.org/2018/07/24/2...180402_143955/ .

    This is how I grew as a beekeeper - by learning to check for the 2 different signs that mites killed a hive. Mites in dead bees (like 30+ in 300) and mite frass means... most of those mites were home grown. Mites in dead bees and NO mite frass (find the last capped brood, look around there - it will be most concentrated there if it is present) means the bees went robbing.

    How to counter that in the future is a different story...

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