The 'Gallup' Long Hive. - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Hi Trish - I think that's a fair summary. However, after checking 'Gleanings' for the following 3 years I was very surprised to learn that no-one had seized upon the potential of this procedure. I was also curious about Doolittle's own lack of enthusiasm for it:
    I've since learned that Doolittle's article was in fact the final salvo in an argument which had started the previous year, with Doolittle initially expressing a very negative opinion of Long Hives in general (which I'm sad to say demonstrates that even Doolittle was guilty of both ignorance and prejudice - more on that in another post) but even so, in regard to this particular issue all is not quite as rosy as might first appear.

    I think it's fair to assume that the removal of honey causes brood-rearing to be stimulated due to the colony recognising (somehow) that the existing number of bees is insufficient to provide enough stores for winter survival - and so more bees are duly generated. Which is great news for a bee-farmer, and dispells the myth that you can't produce both honey AND bees at the same time. BUT - think about the season ...

    Honey is being removed during the flow (obviously), and the bees' response to this is to then generate more brood to create roughly double the number of bees - but this enlarged number of bees will result towards the end, or even after the flow. So, you've then got double the number of mouths to feed, with most of them sitting around idle, as at that time there will be nothing much in the way of nectar coming into the hive. Bags of bees - but at the wrong time of the season (unless you happen to be a bee-farmer).

    This of course is a recipe for swarming, which Doolittle completely fails to mention in the above source - but - in a much earlier tirade against the 'Long-idea' beehive (which was quickly countered by those with more experience and expertise with them than Doolittle) he cites both excessive swarming and the hive's inability to over-winter as being core features of horizontal hives.

    . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Now that Horizontal Hives (in general) have a suitable home for discussion, I think it might be useful to examine the early experiences of the Long-idea Hive in America, contrasting these with those of the broadly similar hive styles of Eastern Europe.
    I'm currently delving into American Long Hive history as revealed in 'Gleanings' 1873 onwards, and will post relevant articles as they emerge. I'm hoping that Greg will be able to supply the Eastern European perspective.
    LJ
    So Correct me If I am reading this incorrect. The large harvest was due to taking honey more often. So this suggests the bees work toward a "perceived" need and then "may slack off raise less brood etc. By Taking some early they perceive they need to up the effort and raise more brood to get to the perceived stores threshold.. Would this not work for any hive system? I do not think the hive shape would change the way the bees operate. Would taking honey 3 times a year get you to a larger harvest for the year? I ask for several reasons but primary less supers is less work and less storage. Splitting the harvest would make 2 smaller jobs instead of 1 big one. And I can beat the rest of the Beeks to market with fresh honey. Add wet supers back during flow not dearth. this may be something to ponder..
    GG

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  3. #42
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gray Goose View Post
    The large harvest was due to taking honey more often. So this suggests the bees work toward a "perceived" need and then "may slack off raise less brood etc. ...GG
    Just a couple of days ago I found an interesting blog that confirms the same finding.
    Hives with the biggest frames (500mmx500mm) configured horizontally and the least managed - produced the least honey (vs. other setups).
    The observation was that the bees were just way TOO comfortable and were lacking some urgency in honey harvest (but instead were more prolific - and consumed more so to make more bees).
    I will post something later.

    However, also consider
    1)how much overall time/effort was spent per the unit of honey by the keeper (every time you open a hive - that is time spent),
    2)does the keeper intend to sell or not (one can only consume so much - no need to produce way too much),
    3)is the keeper available at all to do any work around the bees over the summer (some live far away; others have much life outside of the bees)...
    Some of these points could be the actual defining factors.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  4. #43
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    Just a couple of days ago I found an interesting blog that confirms the same finding.
    Hives with the biggest frames (500mmx500mm) configured horizontally and the least managed - produced the least honey (vs. other setups).

    However, also consider
    1)how much overall time/effort was spent per the unit of honey by the keeper (every time you open a hive - that is time spent),
    2)does the keeper intend to sell or not (one can only consume so much - no need to produce way too much),
    3)is the keeper available at all to do any work around the bees over the summer (some live far away; others have much life outside of the bees)...
    Some of these points could be the actual defining factors.
    Greg, Thanks for engaging. i'll offer comment by the number of the question.
    1) in late June when I add super 3 and 4 I could easily trap out the full frames from the first 2 supers and if using all the same frames maybe 3 or 4 from the edge of the brood nest. not a huge add for work. The big ones get checked for Q cells anyway
    2) yes I sell to defray the cost of Frames, foundation, gas queens, paint etc. Last year I ended up with about $1000 If I can get to 1500 that works for me. That would be Dato blades and a router
    3) well the answer here is it varies 1 Apiary in in the back yard and the farthest is 4 hours away. So I "could" extract the back yard, take the wets up to the far apiary, pull the first super there, add the wets, bring back the full supers, and extract then put the wets back on the backyard Apiary. Again for 50% more honey I would find a way. I drive up to super and check , coming back with 8 supers of honey in the back of the truck would not be a huge issue.

    Yes I know the danger of moving honey from hive to hive. Whatever. I see big stacks of wets in front of commercials all the time , bees thick, it happens. Also who removes the honey in the tree dead outs. They are all splits of each other any way. so feel free to criticize but I am already aware.

    So for me this is good news, last year the extract was a bit much, took a day off work did it in 3 day weekend, splitting it into 2 different weekends and eventually 3 would also help.
    Also I ran out of supers last year. I made 20 more this winter but a mid year extract would be helpful in my case.

    BTW I use Langs and am moving toward all Mediums.

    GG

  5. #44
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gray Goose View Post
    [...] The large harvest was due to taking honey more often. So this suggests the bees work toward a "perceived" need and then "may slack off raise less brood etc. By Taking some early they perceive they need to up the effort and raise more brood to get to the perceived stores threshold.
    Perception of existing levels of stored honey viz-a-viz brood numbers is certainly one possibility. The other could be that it's a sequela - in the sense of a predictable sequence or automatic consequence of an action.

    If we consider the situation when humans aren't involved, then there are no such entities in the natural honeybee nest as 'brood combs' or 'honey combs' ... there are just 'combs' - with those combs being used for different purposes at different times during the season.

    If we examine the sequence in late Winter, then honey will have been progressively removed during that dormant period. Depending upon local conditions, some small amounts of brood may indeed have been reared during winter within cells which had previously held honey, but for many colonies circumstances are such that brood-rearing only commences once the natural world wakes-up and fresh pollen begins to come into the hive. Assuming that space has become available by honey removal, this brood-rearing will initially take place near the top of the comb where the conditions are warmest. As the season begins to unfold, brood-rearing progressively moves down the comb, and former brood cells - now empty - will begin to be back-filled with nectar.

    This then can be considered as a natural sequence: former honey cells becoming brood cells, and former brood cells in turn becoming honey cells.

    Now if we were to take a snapshot of such a comb, we might indeed conclude that "bees store honey over brood", which is of course absolutely true as a stand-alone observational statement - and underpins the logic of placing supers with their purpose-made honey-combs (to which the queen is invariably denied access) above brood boxes. But it would also be just as true to say that "bees store honey in cells which previously held brood" - and - "bees raise brood in cells which previously held honey", and that the axiom of "honey is always stored over brood" - although true - is the result of making an observation during only one part of the cycle, and concluding that this is an inherent feature of the species, without questioning exactly 'why' this positioning is being made.

    I think Doolittle's observation that every single comb in those 32-frame Long Hives held brood gives an important clue as to the dynamics which occur whenever the queen is allowed free reign to lay wherever she wishes.

    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    LJ I may try a couple hives this year where I extract a box and then place it under the stack. Now they have 6 inches less honey overhead and 6 more inches of comb under the brood nest. For your, long hive perhaps take a frame or 2 of honey, filled as they move back toward the entrance. Extract it and place empty s behind them. Somewhat walking up the down escalator. If you cannot extract and have combs, one could remove the honey shift the bees and place empty comb behind them. It may be the % of empty cells in the nest that drives brood production. As you say later in the year empty cells are scarcer. If we slowly remove full and add empty cells, we may trigger a longer build up and slower decline. Ergo a higher population for a fraction of the flow. for the long hive you could split late some of the larger population and give 3 or 4 frames of stores, allowing a longer splitting season. Lots of ways to play it, once you understand the drive behind it.
    GG

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gray Goose View Post
    Lots of ways to play it, once you understand the drive behind it.
    Yeah - but that's the elusive bit ...

    I guess what I was trying to say before was that it could be a) the bees making a decision based on observation/awareness, or b) them making a 'knee-jerk' reaction, over which they have little say. 32 frames - all with brood in 'em - makes very little sense, when 10-12 would be more than sufficient.

    Easy enough to test (I think ...) - take a freshly extracted honey-comb (worker cell size) and place it into the brood nest of a colony which already has ample amounts of brood. I'd bet money that comb would be jumped-on and laid-up within 24 hrs. Then repeat to check.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Yeah - but that's the elusive bit ...

    I guess what I was trying to say before was that it could be a) the bees making a decision based on observation/awareness, or b) them making a 'knee-jerk' reaction, over which they have little say. 32 frames - all with brood in 'em - makes very little sense, when 10-12 would be more than sufficient.

    Easy enough to test (I think ...) - take a freshly extracted honey-comb (worker cell size) and place it into the brood nest of a colony which already has ample amounts of brood. I'd bet money that comb would be jumped-on and laid-up within 24 hrs. Then repeat to check.
    LJ
    ex-actually and if you say had 10 long hives and pulled 1 or 2 frames of honey, extracted it and placed it back in the brood nest. You would simultaneously remove stores and provide empty cells in the brood nest. Simple twist, use drone comb for either the best breeding hives for mating readiness or the remove and freeze program for IPM. could even move drone comb from your breeder to a non breeder to have them raise the drones you wish to have. So once this impulse is understood it can be used to reach several different goals. For me out of the box I would use it for OTBN and production increase. then Late split for increase.
    GG

  9. #48
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Abbé Rueher's modified Congolese (long horizontal) beehive (Almost a Gallup frame)

    found here Bees in French Equatorial Africa: their habits, their culture



    We note a distance between frames of 35mm (1920 we had not yet understood that for African bees it is between 31 and 32 mm) and that he then calls the Top bars "comb holder".

    "The primitive Congolese, which dates from 1920, was modified in August 1926. The innovations made to the latter model (fig. 16) concern only the roof and the bottom. The body of the hive does not change in any way: it is placed on the tray where it is held by means of four trunnions."
    "The roof is flat, made of assembled boards 15 mm. thick and covered with a sheet of zinc or sheet metal. It protrudes from the body by 2 cm. ½ on each side, which are taken up by a 2 cm. high frame. This way the tent fits over the hive, preventing access to spiders and moths."
    "The bottom, instead of being flat, has the shape of an upside-down triangle, with an inner height of 12 cm., one third of the base. It increases the volume of the hive by about 12 liters. The tray, being tilted, is at the same time made self-cleaning, but remains mobile or removable."
    "1° The hive always stays clean, since the flared and sloping bottom allows waste and condensation to drain away automatically."
    " 2° For the bees: more space and more air. Instead of cluttering up the tray and the flight board, during rest, the workers remain in the hive and hang below the frames."
    " 3° Given this particularity, an inspection or an operation is easy to do: there are, so to speak, no bees left on the combs."
    " 4° The entrance, made along the whole length of the hive, gives a wide ventilation with the rear ventilation openings. Moreover, it is protected from the sun and guaranteed from the rain."
    " 5° Finally, thanks to the vacuum or air chamber under the frames, the workers, - especially those of a large swarm, - form the cluster there for the elaboration of the wax intended for the construction of the combs. We have seen this, and this in itself is a very great advantage."

    Excerpt from: Rueher, J.B. "The Bees of French Equatorial Africa. Their habits, their culture. Practical and easy instructions and methods for rational and modern beekeeping (1929).*»


    we find a new modification for the Metropolitan adaptation in L'Apiculteur 1932 -02

    Or here in PDF and again a description in L'apiculteur 1931 about the colonial exhibition.

    .../...Then it's the technical drawings of my new hive:
    "France-Congo" model 1931 - possibly the "Congolese 1925" transformed for the climate of Europe.
    At the bottom, - on its pedestal, rests the hive with its frames. A large board indicates its main characteristics,
    as follows: Illuminated horizontal hive -
    Mobile system with
    1° One or two bodies.
    2° Cold buildings for hot countries,
    or
    3° Warm buildings for cold countries.
    Indeed, this hive can be converted instantly into either system.
    4° Mobile frame divider in perforated zinc, dividing the body into honey and brood compartments.
    5° Inner chamber for summer.
    6° Movable bottom removing this
    room for the winter.
    7° Movable frame partition reducing
    half the hive for the wintering.
    8° Self-cleaning triangular bottom.
    9° Frame-closing system "R" improvised.
    10° Metal frame holder system.
    These are many combinations! and yet nothing complicated, as one would be tempted to believe; on the contrary, everything is childishly simple. Already, despite a certain originality, my beehive and its systems are very noticed, especially by foreigners.
    In spite of advantageous offers, which I refused, I want my invention, if any, to remain in the public domain. At the most, I wanted to preserve, out of patriotism, at least the name and origin of the beehive by registering the design.
    J.-B. RUEHER,
    Missionary in French Congo.
    the top bars he calls them "impropolisable "R" closing frame system"!





    The Beehive " France Congo "

    On the whole it is our "Congolese 1925", somewhat modified for the climate of Europe.
    .../on the advice of beekeepers
    our tropical 30x31 frame inside, which seems too small,
    Our primitive frame (1920)
    and when we modified it, we were unaware of the existence of the Voirnot 33x33 cm frame.
    By substituting the latter for ours...

    The hive body has an internal volume of 75 x 37 1/2 x 37 1/2 c/m, i.e. a capacity of 105 litres.
    The front board is 80 x 20 (17 at the inner corners) x 2 1/2) c/m, notched below 10 m/m over a length of
    75 c/m, which is the distance between the two short sides: this is 'the actual flight hole'.

    The 80x45x2 1/2 c/m bottom thus assembled forms a vacuum or air chamber, under the frames, which, being square, do not descend into it. This chamber has a capacity of seventeen and a half litres. It ensures the bees of laplace, of the pure air unceasingly renewed, it avoids the swarming and the beard".


    For "France-Congo" we'll use 36mm wide closing frames.

  10. #49
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Hi Greg - useful links, thanks.

    I've been considering the idea of a one-piece (fixed-volume) Warre for some time now, which would dispense with the tortuous idea of nadiring boxes (when was the last time anyone saw a tree leap into the air in order to insert a fresh section of tree-trunk ?) - my idea being to never disturb the position the bees have adopted in the cavity, but rather to control the hive's volume around them by means of horizontal dividers. The above hive might just be doing something similar ?

    Again, thanks for the links.
    LJ
    a new hive based on the concept of the Melifera bees "favourite volumeé according to T. Seeley.




    To answer these and other questions, our qualified beekeeper and carpenter, Johannes Poeplau, built several hives with a 45-litre brood chamber during the winter months.*

    These consist of four centimetre thick solid wood walls and offer space for 8 "einraumbeute" frames.*
    At the bottom there is a floor ("crawl space" like einrambeute) of about 10 litres.*
    At the top, the hive is covered with a wax cloth and insulated with a 40 millimetre thick flexible insulation wool. "With thicker insulation, food consumption in winter is much lower," explains Norbert Poeplau.*
    There is also a honey super of*around*14 litres. (~1/3 rd Warré volume)

    Given that the dimensions are those of the Warrés the Warrés supers(s) or half supers could be used and we could managed*like pastorals 'dadants' that could be a bit funny,

    or make "Monocadres AT"

  11. #50
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Interesting idea LJ
    with regards to :
    control the hive's volume around them by means of horizontal dividers.

    If we move the divider to a bigger size will the honey barrier at the edge be moved by the bees to enlarge the nest or do you split it open leaving the wall combs on the wall?

    Ideally if you used 2 dividers and centered the nest one could take 1 comb of honey from each side, to shrink it, then C&S for the honey.
    Is this also being considered or do we have 1 side expansion only.

    If 1 side expansion only do we have a long hive in a shot box then?

    GG

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    I think Greg is better placed than myself to answer such a question, as divider-pairs are seen in several Russian/Ukrainian beehive designs. But - I'll have a go, bearing in mind that I'm on a learning curve here myself.

    As I understand it - the dividers are not so much used to regulate the hive volume - that stays fixed - it's to control the size of the brood nest within it. You need to bear in mind that the frames used in these hives are DEEP, and so each one of them will contain some honey stores which are then available for immediate brood-rearing use. Therefore the presence of a honey barrier no longer exists, as it does in a shallow Long Hive. Surplus honey - that is, over and above immediate needs - is stored on the other side of the partition boards (to which there is free access for all the bees except the Queen, for those boards act as a Queen Excluder.

    The Gallup Hive which Doolittle used - which he called his "six-frame hive" - had six frames between the partition boards over the winter period, with insulating chaff etc filling the cavities on either side. As the season got under way, he would expand the brood nest to nine frames by means of the partition boards. The three-frame spaces left at either end of the hive would then be used to house section racks. If extracted honey was wanted, both he and Elisha Gallup used to 'super' their hives, sometimes with one, sometimes with two boxes.

    As I don't intend to ever produce section honey, I've enlarged the cavities which will exist to either side of the brood nest over winter - but exactly how these will be used during the season is still something to be decided. I've also made provision for supering the hive, although I seriously doubt this facility will ever be needed. It will of course hold substantial amounts of insulation, and may be used as a feeder shell ... if needed.

    Photos to follow ...
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    I think Greg is better placed than myself to answer such a question, as divider-pairs are seen in several Russian/Ukrainian beehive designs. But - I'll have a go, bearing in mind that I'm on a learning curve here myself.

    As I understand it - the dividers are not so much used to regulate the hive volume - that stays fixed - it's to control the size of the brood nest within it. You need to bear in mind that the frames used in these hives are DEEP, and so each one of them will contain some honey stores which are then available for immediate brood-rearing use. Therefore the presence of a honey barrier no longer exists, as it does in a shallow Long Hive. Surplus honey - that is, over and above immediate needs - is stored on the other side of the partition boards (to which there is free access for all the bees except the Queen, for those boards act as a Queen Excluder.

    The Gallup Hive which Doolittle used - which he called his "six-frame hive" - had six frames between the partition boards over the winter period, with insulating chaff etc filling the cavities on either side. As the season got under way, he would expand the brood nest to nine frames by means of the partition boards. The three-frame spaces left at either end of the hive would then be used to house section racks. If extracted honey was wanted, both he and Elisha Gallup used to 'super' their hives, sometimes with one, sometimes with two boxes.

    As I don't intend to ever produce section honey, I've enlarged the cavities which will exist to either side of the brood nest over winter - but exactly how these will be used during the season is still something to be decided. I've also made provision for supering the hive, although I seriously doubt this facility will ever be needed. It will of course hold substantial amounts of insulation, and may be used as a feeder shell ... if needed.

    Photos to follow ...
    LJ
    Sweet, sounds like a fun project.

    I Am looking at the Buckeye with a Gallop bottom.

    I have a lang investment and I like the stack OKish.

    I can then use the 5 framer and 8 framers for growth/NUCS and slowly put the production Hives into insulated boxes.
    I want a couple proto types by sept to try this year.

    i'll try to get picks as I do them

    GG

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Ok - this is the basic brood box, identical upper and lower entrances at both ends. Shown with the division boards much as Doolittle would have used them during winter. Grab handles at either end. Made from 1 1/4" recycled pallet wood.




    This shows the 3-piece Crown Board I'll initially be trialing - any problems and I'll swap to using some form of breathable fabric (will need the roof venting then, of course). I've cracked the boards open a little, so they're more obvious - otherwise the mating edges are invisible. The reason for the 3-piece is that the central section will not be disturbed during winter.




    Feeder Shell, doubling as a super which I doubt will ever be used as such. Handy for holding insulation though. Be daft not to make one whilst the box in in the workshop.




    Telescopic roof, covered in a PVC supermarket 'Special Offer' banner. Easy and quick to make - ideal for experimental hives - I have 4 National-Warre(*) hives with these roofs, and they're all holding-up well. Should be good for 6-7 years.




    I'm now just waiting for the paint to de-odourise before installing a colony.
    LJ

    (*)Warre hives dimensioned to fit 8 x 14" long British-National frames, rather than Warre's 8 x 12". Can also be used to house 10 x Gallup frames, across the box.
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    studying up on the gallup hives just have to make one thanks every one for in put

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    I think Greg is better placed than myself to answer such a question, as divider-pairs are seen in several Russian/Ukrainian beehive designs. But - I'll have a go, bearing in mind that I'm on a learning curve here myself.......
    LJ
    Am not sure understood the question so refrain from much commenting.

    My long hives operate on asymmetric configuration and typically I only use a single divider board (to cut the tail off, so to speak).

    In fact, right now two of my hives have divider board in place so to cut off the brood nest from the rest of the frames.
    Based on the observation, I will want to do the same for all long hives - yes, meaning right now (in the middle of the summer).

    My current observation - my long hives "suffer" from over-ventilation and humidity levels in the brood nests are too low to my liking.
    Somehow these hives are very well ventilated; too much for the brood nest (the test long hive is running consistently drier than than the control nuc that I keep double-boxed and under blankets in summer).

    A divider board in place increase the humidity readings in the long hive brood nest by about 5-10%.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Update re: the 2ft Gallup-Framed Long Hive ...

    I've just done the first 100% inspection of the hive since installing the bees. I needed to lift the box onto it's permanent stand, so pulled every last frame in order to lighten it.

    Positives:
    # frames spaced at 32mm have ALL (as far as I can tell, as some are capped honey) been drawn with worker comb. No problems at all in that area.
    # the colony has been powering away, is strong, healthy and beekeeper-friendly. Although I'd taken the precaution of having a working smoker handy in view of the anticipated disruption - it wasn't needed - not even once.
    # although a 100% anthropomorphic observation: it would appear that the colony is happy with both the Gallup Frame size, and the hive dimensions which - if vertical - would be the same as that of the Warre Hive and the early American Box Hive (when supered).

    Negatives:
    # the bottom of the hive was wet - I've opened-up the rear bottom entrance with a view to increasing the airflow through the hive, and have added temporary insulation above the Crown Boards (inner covers). More permanent insulation (a 3" slab of polystyrene) is currently being glued-up in the workshop. If these steps doesn't cure the problem, then I'll fit vents in the hive floor.

    Although the original plan was that a protected bottom entrance would be provided at one end of the hive, with an upper vent located at the other end to provide cross-flow ventilation - due to the simplified method of colony transfer, the upper vent above the hive entrance (which would normally be closed) was kept open, and the vast majority of bees have adopted this vent hole as their principle entrance. As this hole was only intended as a vent hole rather than an entrance, it wasn't fitted with any form of anti-robbing protection, nor is retro-fitting such protection straightforward. I'll need to keep my eye on this - but so far, so good.

    All in all - very happy with progress - except for the wet floor.

    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  18. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    4,805

    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Update re: the 2ft Gallup-Framed Long Hive ...
    ..........
    All in all - very happy with progress - except for the wet floor.

    LJ
    Thanks for the update.
    Boy, you do have it wet.
    Wet floor is a possibility during cool/cold season here and usually a sign of a faulty hive, but never in summer (the water will evaporate).

    Will you quickly remind the frame dimensions?
    colony is happy with both the Gallup Frame size,
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  19. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    2,281

    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Hi Greg - sure - 11 & 1/4" x 11 & 1/4" outside dimensions.

    This size was chosen by Elisha Gallup as it would have fitted the American Box Hive (12" x 12" x 12" inside measure), a size which had developed a proven track record as a fixed-comb brood box prior to Langstroth's invention.

    I looked in on that hive again earlier today, and it looks a lot drier - but - I'll keep monitoring this.
    'best
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  20. #59
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    Dane County, WI, USA
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    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Hi Greg - sure - 11 & 1/4" x 11 & 1/4" outside dimensions.
    ......
    LJ
    Thanks LJ.
    11 & 1/4 - will remember now.
    This is the depth dimension for the Lang Jumbo frame (which I have a full box of un-assembled - still unsure what to do with them).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  21. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    2,281

    Default Re: The 'Gallup' Long Hive.

    This morning I checked on one of my National-Warre's which was displaying reduced traffic compared with others, only to find it had turned drone-layer - yet another one !

    But - it had a cracking Gallup frame of pollen, and so I swifted that over to the Gallup Long Hive. I took the opportunity of checking it's floor, which is now nice and dry.
    Seems ventilation combined with top insulation is a good remedy in this part of the world.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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