Pesticide Residues in Food and Cancer Risk: A Critical Analysis
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  1. #1
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    Default Pesticide Residues in Food and Cancer Risk: A Critical Analysis

    "[]Concentrations of natural pesticides in plants are usually found at parts per thousand or million rather than parts per billion, which is the usual concentration of synthetic pesticide residues. Therefore, because humans are exposed to so many more natural than synthetic chemicals (by weight and by num- ber), human exposure to natural rodent carcinogens, as defined by high-dose rodent tests, is ubiquitous (Ames et al., 1990b). It is probable that almost every fruit and vegetable in the super- market contains natural pesticides that are rodent carcinogens. Even though only a tiny proportion of natural pesticides have been tested for carcinogenicity, 37 of 71 that have been tested are rodent carcinogens that are present in the common foods[]"

    source: https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cpdb/pdfs...toxicology.pdf

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Pesticide Residues in Food and Cancer Risk: A Critical Analysis

    "[…]The chemicals se- lected for testing in rodents, however, are primarily synthetic (Gold et al., 1997a, b, c, 1998, 1999). The enormous back- ground of human exposures to natural chemicals has not been systematically examined. This has led to an imbalance in both data and perception about possible carcinogenic hazards to hu- mans from chemical exposures. The regulatory process does not take into account (1) that natural chemicals make up the vast bulk of chemicals to which humans are exposed; (2) that the toxicology of synthetic and natural toxins is not fundamentally different; (3) that about half of the chemicals tested, whether natural or synthetic, are carcinogens when tested using current experimental protocols; (4) that testing for carcinogenicity at near-toxic doses in rodents does not provide enough informa- tion to predict the excess number of human cancers that might occur at low-dose exposures; and (5) that testing at the max- imum tolerated dose (MTD) frequently can cause chronic cell killing and consequent cell replacement (a risk factor for cancer that can be limited to high doses) and that ignoring this effect in risk assessment can greatly exaggerate risks.[…]"

    source: https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cpdb/pdfs...toxicology.pdf

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Pesticide Residues in Food and Cancer Risk: A Critical Analysis

    "[…] Possible cancer hazards from pesticide residues in food have been much discussed and hotly debated in the scientific lit- erature, the popular press, the political arena, and the courts. Consumer opinion surveys indicate that much of the U.S. pub- lic believes that pesticide residues in food are a serious cancer hazard (Opinion Research Corporation, 1990). In contrast, epi- demiologic studies indicate that the major preventable risk factors for cancer are smoking, dietary imbalances, endogenous hormones, and inflammation (e.g., from chronic infections). Other important factors include intense sun exposure, lack of physical activity, and excess alcohol consumption (Ames et al., 1995). The types of cancer deaths that have decreased since 1950 are primarily stomach, cervical, uterine, and colorectal. Overall cancer death rates in the United States (excluding lung cancer) have declined 19% since 1950 (Ries et al., 2000). The types that have increased are primarily lung cancer [87% is due to smoking, as are 31% of all cancer deaths in the United States (American Cancer Society, 2000)], melanoma (probably due to sunburns), and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.[…]"

    source: https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cpdb/pdfs...toxicology.pdf

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