box storage
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Thread: box storage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    NW Florida
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    Default box storage

    I need a way to store my extra nucs and hive bodies other than my shed. I'm thinking about an open lean-to style stacking area with 2x4 to raise them off the ground and a 4x8 roof of advantec and left over shingles. In my humid, rainy climate, will this warp them or make them a nesting area for critters? Will I be okay with an open front that is door-less?
    Beek since 2016: Hardiness Zone 9a: in NW Florida

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
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    Default Re: box storage

    You might want to consider stacking the empty boxes, exactly as if they had frames/combs/bees in 'em - i.e. complete with stand, base and roof - only with some protected ventilation (mesh etc) installed at both top and bottom of each stack to keep 'em 'sweet'. If your place is anything like mine, you'll still need to evict a few spiders come Spring, and there may be a trace of mould which should easily wipe off. Putting such stacks under some kind of rain-proof cover would certainly be a huge bonus.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  4. #3

    Default Re: box storage

    The only problem you will have is mice. I bought a enclosed trailer for mine. No more mice problems.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Portland,Tennessee
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    17

    Default Re: box storage

    I stack under an open lean-too. I made a screen top & bottom cover & use some cheap ratchet from HF to strap the together. This keeps them from warping & seals them up nicely. Like you I keep them off the ground so they get good air flow. Never had any problems.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    4,960

    Default Re: box storage

    JG, I am im complete agreement with little john. Set down some cinder blocks and stack the boxes just like they were functioning hives. You could probably go about three hives tall. Staple some window screen over the opening to keep out the bigger bugs but the palmettoes will still get in no doubt. If the lean to is just three sided, you might want to leave the top box open as a swarm trap. My wife lets me keep all my bee stuff in a small bedroom. It is packed.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Bucks County PA
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    383

    Default Re: box storage

    Rodents and other small creatures are a factor...in the latter case, you also need to guard against wood-eating insects who will love to chomp on the typical pine that bee boxes are usually made from.
    Humble assistant to beek Alison as well as family purveyor of luxury Bee condominiums and Paparazzi activities...

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Derry, New Hampshire
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    2,295

    Default Re: box storage

    if you have comb anywhere you store them should be as little john and JW describe. Or sealed up tight with moth crystals inside. Have you considered in the shed above your head? i put some shelves at the roofline and put quite a few up there. depends how big your shed is i guess.
    Terrence

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Lamar Co. Alabama, USA
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    4,141

    Default Re: box storage

    Get them more than 2x4 height above the ground. Fire ants will come up through any cracks in the floor or around the bottom and build in them if the ground is wet. Exposure to daylight might slow them down. Fire ants are a constant problem here.
    "Sometimes the best action, with bees, is no action at all."

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    NW Florida
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    Default Re: box storage

    So far, no mice. I wonder if my dogs keep them from living here.

    Beemantn, do you have a picture you can post?

    JW, Your wife is more understanding than I am. Too much of a bug attractant to keep them in the house imo. and yes, those *&&*5 palmetto bugs really do gross me out. If I suspect they are there, I have hubby open the box. We put niban in the shed and didn't see any last time we were moving stuff around. I need to find a safe way to put some with the stored bee boxes without risking getting any on the boxes. The particles are smaller than I expected.

    Jim, termites are a HUGE issue here. We have more species than most places in the U.S. Not sure if any method will protect against those.

    Kaizen, I have installed some shelves along the ceiling. Shed is 10x14 with a decent attic. Problem is that I have equipment intensive hobbies and run an animal rescue. I hope to sell off some of the extra cages soon.

    Gary, good point with the fire ants. We found some big ones in our shed this weekend. I think they live in the oak trees around here. Last time I saw some was in a swarm trap high in an oak. I have one green cooragated roof sheet. Maybe I can find another and increase the light penetration over the shade plywood casts.

    I appreciate everyone's input. Lots of good points to take into consideration. Too bad I can't talk myself into building a bee shed. Gotta finish painting and trimming the other shed first...
    Beek since 2016: Hardiness Zone 9a: in NW Florida

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Bucks County PA
    Posts
    383

    Default Re: box storage

    There are other wood boring/eating insects beyond termites... Keep the stuff up off the ground a reasonable distance and be sure to monitor things.
    Humble assistant to beek Alison as well as family purveyor of luxury Bee condominiums and Paparazzi activities...

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    1,375

    Default Re: box storage

    Sounds like an invitation to mice and wax moth to me.
    Stack them on their sides, top to top (so the frames do not fall out), then put the covers over them to keep the hive bodies together and the rain out of them.
    Ratchet strap them together. with the air and light in them you will not get bugs or mice nests.If you seal them up the mice just chew through the frame rest part of the hive and you have 3 or 4 frames of mouse nest and stink. If they do not hit the field first thing in the spring the wax moth will destroy just about every thing else left.
    Ask 10 beeks, get 12 suggestions. keep in mind that I am a poor bee keeper and stack lots of boxes for the winter in addition to the supers.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Bloomfield,KY
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    386

    Default Re: box storage

    I stack mine in a lean-to on plastic pallets, seal them up, and use paramoth crystals. No mouse or moth problems. I've been doing it this way for years with no issues.
    "Of all God's creatures, only the honeybee improves its environment and preys on no other species."--Haydon Brown

  14. #13
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    Jul 2017
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    NW Florida
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    Default Re: box storage

    minz, wax moths are a year round issue here. Very little freeze time, even night time freezes.

    sharpbees, how do you seal them? Just boxes or boxes with comb frames? I'm thinking an upside down bottom and a top with lots of boxes stacked in-between. I wonder if this will allow for wax frames during the winter... Any issues with residue from the crystals/fumes? Do you have them in a container?
    Beek since 2016: Hardiness Zone 9a: in NW Florida

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: box storage

    [QUOTE=Jadeguppy;1689345]I need a way to store my extra nucs and hive bodies other than my shed.

    Stack on 2x4s or stone, cover with a tarp, weight tarp down. Some nucs will fit end-on inside hive bodies. If wind is an issue, hammer a piece of rebar or a fiberglass garden stake in the ground, slide some PVC over this (a piece as long as your planned stack), then stack up the hive bodies with this support inside to stop blow-over. A coffee can full of moth balls set under the tarp will keep most insects, rodents, etc away, though these are unlikely to cause your boxes any harm.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Terryville, CT
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: box storage

    Hi Jadeguppy,

    I built a bee shed out of a dog kennel. I have a bigger problem with Bears. In the winter I have the outside covered with ventilating tarps. This protects from winter winds and snow. I stack the boxes like you would in a hive and also place around the boxes, small sandwich plastic bags with a paper towel saturated with peppermint oil to discourage the mice. Come spring, I will remove the tarps and stack the boxes on edge to allow air and light to get at the frames to discourage wax moths.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Bloomfield,KY
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    386

    Default Re: box storage

    Quote Originally Posted by Jadeguppy View Post
    minz, wax moths are a year round issue here. Very little freeze time, even night time freezes.

    sharpbees, how do you seal them? Just boxes or boxes with comb frames? I'm thinking an upside down bottom and a top with lots of boxes stacked in-between. I wonder if this will allow for wax frames during the winter... Any issues with residue from the crystals/fumes? Do you have them in a container?
    I just put them on plywood on the pallets then stack boxes w/ frames, I add a spacer on top them put the paramoth in a container on top and cover with a lid. I usually air them out for a day or so before using them.
    "Of all God's creatures, only the honeybee improves its environment and preys on no other species."--Haydon Brown

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    George County, MS
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: box storage

    Quote Originally Posted by Jadeguppy View Post

    Gary, good point with the fire ants. We found some big ones in our shed this weekend. I think they live in the oak trees around here. Last time I saw some was in a swarm trap high in an oak. I have one green cooragated roof sheet. Maybe I can find another and increase the light penetration over the shade plywood casts.

    I appreciate everyone's input. Lots of good points to take into consideration. Too bad I can't talk myself into building a bee shed. Gotta finish painting and trimming the other shed first...
    Jadeguppy,
    The best thing for creepy crawlies is powdered boric acid. You can buy it for a few dollars a pint. Sprinkle it around on a floor and the various insects pick it up on their legs. They ingest it when cleaning themselves and it disrupts their digestive system. It is quite effective and nontoxic to humans and pets.

    About the only thing I find that works for fire ants is a bit Amdro on their nest.

    I'm a new beek just west of you in MS. I'm interested in your progress.

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    NW Florida
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    1,171

    Default Re: box storage

    Azalea, welcome to the fun. I put granulated boric acid (niban) in my shed a short bit ago and it looks like the palmetto bugs are gone. Soooo happy. Diatomaceous earth works for regular ants, I'm waiting to see if it works on fire ants. It should if they walk through it. However, both are bad for bees.

    A neighbor put a deep freeze out on the street. They said it works, so I snagged it for extra comb in winter. I think we are going to incorporate some of the ideas mentioned above and make a lean to for the boxes.
    Beek since 2016: Hardiness Zone 9a: in NW Florida

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