Stopping Moisture - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    Quote Originally Posted by mgolden View Post
    Can you add to this? Trust you are providing some ventilation for top side of inner cover.

    Is it as simple as interior warm moist hive air is rising and exiting through hole in center of the inner cover, venting upper side of inner cover, and exiting out through open notch in upper lip of inner cover? The notch in the upper lip on top side of inner cover is unimpeded as a result of modifications to front side of telescopic cover.
    Attached is a photo (I hope it comes through OK). A sugar block shim is above the brood box, inner cover on top of that, and the top cover on that. You can see the opening. I found that with the standard tele cover the area between the inner cover and the tele cover is pretty stagnant, even if you set it with the opening. Lifting one end with a shim worked pretty good but I decided that if I was going to build them all myself, why not also add in an over hang than keeps some of the rain off the landing board. The modified tele covers all jut out about 3 extra inches beyond normal. The additional ventilation keeps evaporating any condensation on the inner cover and takes it away quickly. I got to watch a swarm come out of a hive with this type of top a few years ago. Watching them fly out of the top and the bottom at the same time was really fascinating!rps20181230_184840.jpg

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Keystone Heights, Fl. U.S.A.
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    Quote Originally Posted by Tlknghd View Post
    I took advantage of today's warm weather to take a sneak peek inside my largest, healthiest hive. Found lots of bees and lot's of honey/pollen and unfortunately, lots of condensation. I have a screen bottom and a 3/4 inch opening on the inside cover...but still a good bit of water had pooled on the top of the inside cover. So, what to do next? I was thinking of doing this:
    I have a top super feeder that I used to feed syrup during the dearth...but with large honey stores in the hive it is not being used. I was thinking perhaps putting it back on top of the top super and fill it with straw or pet shavings from the pet store. Then put the inside cover on top of the feeder. My thinking is that 1) the feeder will then act as insulation and 2) absorb any moisture while 3) continuing to allow ventilation.
    Good idea? Bad idea? Anyone got a better idea???
    Thanks!
    If you have that much condensation in your hive not a enough ventilation. My hives I run a 1 1/8 hole under the hand hold on front of the hive with screen over it on every box.
    On the high top feeder I run two 1 1/8 holes in the back of the feeder with screen over them also I don't run inner covers.
    If the hive has too much ventilation the bees will Propolize the screen on the front of the to regulate the ventilation.
    I run this setup year round without a condensation problem.

    Hope this helps!

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Frankston, Victoria, AU
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    ventilation is always the issue, I have a hollow lid with 4 x 3/4 inch holes drilled in the sides, with screens, I then fill the lid with wood shavings and staple a corflute (old plastic political sign, plastic corrugated cardboard) cover to the bottom of the lid, I then cut out the corners. about 1 1/2 inches triangles. All of my hives are tilted to the front, I make the base boards that way, it will allow any condensation to trickle to the front of the hive, run down the inside front and leave through the entrance, keeping the brood nice and dry. You will always have moisture problems when you feed sugar water in the hive, the water has to go somewhere.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Keystone Heights, Fl. U.S.A.
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    I can only tell you what I do in my hives I also run solid bottom boards. When you have shaving in your hive to collect moisture the moisture is still in your hive. The way I have mine it creates a updraft removing moisture from the hive. I don't have a moisture problem in any of my hives and I am currently running 35 hives expanding to over a 100 this spring.
    If you go on Youtube watch Fat Bee Man videos he has a wealth of information you can gain from them.

    Sometimes things don't work for everybody you have to do what you think works for you. Listen to your bees in many cases they will tell what they want.
    In many ways bees are smarter than we are and sometimes they act like spoiled brats.

    I told you what I do you'll have to decide what you want to do.

    Remember cold don't kill bees moisture does!

    I hope in some way this helps someone,
    Happy Bee Keeping

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,852

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    Quote Originally Posted by Tlknghd View Post
    Thanks for replying.
    I am in GA so I don't have the concerns about temperature as you would. We have "cool" weather here in the winter. Not "Cold" like you have. So my concern is more Moisture than temperature. With that in mind, I don't have foam on the top cover, the screen bottom is open, the entrance is open...in fact, even here in late December they are still bringing in lots of pollen. Our humidity is always high here in the South so there is lots of moisture to condense even on a cool night...right now temps are in the low 40's at night. Even with the screen board open, the entrance open and a notch in the inner cover, I still found about a quarter cup of pooled water on the top cover today. Any advice/opinions are welcomed!
    I glue popsicle sticks inside the outer cover in the area it rests on the inner cover or super. In the winter with the foam inside the inner cover I will still use the popsicle sticks. Works good where I am, except this past summer it was very hot so propped covers up.
    Proverbs 16:24

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Landing, NJ, USA
    Posts
    1,026

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    Assuming the inner cover has the notch up, and to the front of the hive, and the hive is tilted a little toward the front. Won't the condensate that forms on top run to the front, out the notch, dribble down the front of the hive onto the landing board and then the ground without doing any harm?
    Bill

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
    Posts
    1,607

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    In my hives the condensate forms under the inner cover, inside the hive.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,852

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    Quote Originally Posted by whiskers View Post
    Assuming the inner cover has the notch up, and to the front of the hive, and the hive is tilted a little toward the front. Won't the condensate that forms on top run to the front, out the notch, dribble down the front of the hive onto the landing board and then the ground without doing any harm?
    Bill
    I wish it was that easy.
    Proverbs 16:24

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    10,347

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    tlknghd, the moisture collecting on the under side of your inner cover is produced by the 'breathing' of the cluster. the stronger the colony, the bigger the cluster, and the more they have to produce heat to keep warm, the more the moisture rising up from the cluster.

    insulating the top is your best bet. this allows the the inside walls of the hive to be colder than the 'ceiling'. the moisture will collect on the sides and run down and out of the hive.

    if your bottom is open the moisture will run out there. if you close your bottom make sure the hive is tilted a little bit forward and the moisture will run out of the bottom entrance.

    i've never liked the idea of quilt boards or other methods of collecting (and holding) moisture at the top. it seems to me like that would just create a cold sink. i think it's better to let the moisture run out the bottom.

    fwiw, i provide upper venting by fully notching (all the way through) and screening both the front and back of the inner cover, about 1" wide and centered left and right. for insulation i fit a piece of 1/2" pink foam insulation board inside the 'frame' of the top side of the inner cover.

    doing these things has eliminated finding mold on the under side of my inner covers in the spring.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    1,817

    Default Re: Stopping Moisture

    Quote Originally Posted by gambler2200 View Post
    Remember cold don't kill bees moisture does!
    I think you mean condensation falling on the cluster ...
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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