Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ? - Page 58
Page 58 of 58 FirstFirst ... 848565758
Results 1,141 to 1,154 of 1154
  1. #1141
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigBlackBirds View Post
    What I find doesnt work much for me---sticking foundation below brood nest or trying to get them to touch boxes of foundation early in the year even when pushed to point of crowding.
    BigBlackBirds:

    Thank you for your input and detailed description of what has worked for you. I sincerely appreciate it!

    I remember Squarepeg mentioning that colonies are reticent to draw-out new comb prior to reproductive cut-off and it sounds like your experience has been similar.

    I want to think through this issue more deeply, but I am interested in generally finding a means to get most colonies to draw out some new comb in most years understanding that I will pay a surplus honey penalty.

    Thank you again for your input and helpful reply- it is insightful.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #1142
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    the bees certainly rebuild combs in smaller increments much more readily (vs. the large increments); especially this is visibly in the natural comb/no-foundation mode - because you see very obvious gaps and holes (vs. less obvious not built foundation)

    ...

    Entire comb re-usability idea is a ticking time-bomb in theory (or maybe not?)

    ...

    Conveniently, large portion of his wooden ware just gets heat treated as a part of wax melting - a good thing for a commercial operator.
    GregV:

    Great feedback. I always appreciate how you are able to come at things from a different perspective. You have mentioned partial comb removals before and this idea makes a lot of sense to me, especially in a foundationless perspective. While I may never utilize this as a routine approach, I can see a lot of situations where this might be a great option.

    As regards the disease vector issue, I certainly appreciate how there are a lot of folks who have kept the same drawn comb for a lot of years (even multiple generations) with little issues. I temper this with the knowledge that there is little harm in having new comb, particularly if you are willing to take the surplus penalty.

    Similarly, if one can build their management plan around periodic comb renewal I can see how having less-than-typical stored comb supers could be a workable solution.

    All-in-all, I want to learn how to reliably increase my drawn comb inventory, but it is good to understand and appreciate how there are folks who are successful when even planning on a more 'crush-and-strain' model.

    Thanks again for your response. I sincerely appreciate it!

  4. #1143
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Clinton, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    442

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    BigBlackBirds:

    Thank you for your input and detailed description of what has worked for you. I sincerely appreciate it!

    I remember Squarepeg mentioning that colonies are reticent to draw-out new comb prior to reproductive cut-off and it sounds like your experience has been similar.

    I want to think through this issue more deeply, but I am interested in generally finding a means to get most colonies to draw out some new comb in most years understanding that I will pay a surplus honey penalty.

    Thank you again for your input and helpful reply- it is insightful.
    Hey Litsinger--
    There has to be something going on early in the year that limits the comb drawing desire (at least for me). I tried it again this past spring out of necessity. Took bees into 40 acre apple orchard around May 10th, blossoms hadnt opened yet, weather was cold and stayed that way for about 6-7 more days, when sun/heat finally arrived the apples popped along with danelions in full force. Super populated hives---primarily double deeps with a few set up deep/medium configuration--just overflowing with bees but not drawing cells yet. I didn't want to super the colonies up yet as have no real need for spring orchard honey and it just causes hassles when bees have to be trucked back out. And I didnt want to split them up too much as the orchard needed a good field force for pollination. So dropped boxes of foundation on around 16 and they never touched it but they did crowd and decide to start swarm prep and was forced to split them up. On 20 others I didn't have foundation ready so was forced to put on drawn honey supers to keep the brood nest from clogging. Those supers were filled and capped when pulled out and headed for summer honey yard around last day of May. Seems odd but happens to me over and over to varying degrees.

    Now wait another 30 days and we start to see the first of the real summer honey flows around me. There can be some minors flows prior but the general flow where we produce honey runs from around first of July until 3rd week of August. Add those same boxes of foundation to hives across that flow and they are drawn and filled. My good drone source colonies (which serve for both mating yards and honey production) each can do 3 deep boxes of foundation year after year if I want. i dont extract deeps but use it for feeding newly mated singles as we head towards fall/winter and it then has replenished what comb departs me as nucs are sold in spring. I didn’t draw a huge number of deeps this year but I did put on over 100 mediums of foundation during this time period and I when I sorted after extracting over 90% of the frames were nicely drawn.

    on years when we have strong goldenrod flow its possible to get a deep drawn on a powerful colony but my experience has been that its more likely that you'll get partially drawn frames. i had 15-20 undrawn deeps left over as we entered late august this year that i threw on; this is just after the main summer crop has been pulled, weather still really warm, and basically way too many bees to fit back into a double deep. putting empty boxes on primarily gives them some breathing room. this year we had a good fall flow but most of those deeps were only partially (30-70%) drawn. i just leave them on hive over the winter and grab them next year. it does seem to cause the bees to jump on the boxes quicker the following year but not my first choice for comb drawing.

  5. #1144
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    If I were asked to summarize his recommendations as succinctly as possible, I would outline them thus:

    8. Be a beeKEEPER rather than a beeHAVER.
    Given that I cannot make this point any better than Mr. Imirie, I will let him speak for himself:

    “Successful beekeeping is BOTH an art an a science. A beeHAVER starts a package in April and hopes for their success, plants his garden, fills his swimming pool, adds one super to his bees and hopes for their success, observes his bees from the back of his lawn mower before he leaves for vacation at the beach and hopes for their success, harvests his tomatoes, squash, cantaloupes in the cool of an August evening and hopes for the success of his bees, waits for a cool September weekend to collect his honey and finds that his bees only made about 10 pounds of honey, and BLAMES the queen producer who sold him the package of bees. In contrast, a beeKEEPER reads the writings of bee researchers and bee scientists and follows their new findings of management techniques, cares for the health of his bees by administering medical treatments that the scientists suggest and DO IT WHEN THE SCIENTIST SAYS TO DO IT, does not relegate his bee work to weekends but performs the needed work on what ever day is best for the bees, and attends bee meetings at many different sites to LEARN, LEARN, LEARN! What do you get for all this? Your reward is the self PRIDE of being successful, and enjoying the JOYS OF BEEKEEPING!”

    “… the science of GOOD beekeeping is NOT designed to CHANGE natural bee BEHAVIOR, but rather for the beeHAVER to LEARN enough about proper hive management and management care and technique that he becomes a beeKEEPER whose bees can do all those desirable things rather than die, swarm, or make very little honey MY POINT IS RATHER SIMPLE - YOU HAVE TO LEARN MANAGEMENT CARE, HIVE TECHNIQUES, DISEASE TREATMENTS, BEE BEHAVIOR, HONEY PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT, and maybe most important, SELECTION OF A GOOD QUEEN.”

    “So, just as one "climbs a mountain just to get to the top", let us all try to Upgrade our thinking from beeHAVER to beeKEEPER!”

    “ASSUMING things is a mark of a beeHAVER, not a beeKEEPER.”

    “NOW, you know why I created the terms beeHAVER and beeKEEPER. Any jerk can HAVE bees, but it takes just a little bit of WORK and some UNDERSTANDING to be a beeKEEPER, and that work must be done on BEE-TIME, not on the TIME most convenient for you.”

    “Are you satisfied with just being a beeHAVER and having to buy new EXPENSIVE bees every year or so? With your intelligence, you could be a real fine beeKEEPER if you just paid as much attention to your bees as you do to [fill in the blank]. Don't you want to find the excitement and JOYS OF BEEKEEPING that I have had for 70+ years?”

    Here are two ‘Pink Pages’ he wrote specifically on this subject:

    http://pinkpages.chrisbacherconsulti...beeKEEPER.html
    http://pinkpages.chrisbacherconsulti..._9_Months.html

  6. #1145
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,884

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    A beeHAVER starts a package in April and hopes for their success, plants his garden, fills his swimming pool, adds one super to his bees and hopes for their success, observes his bees from the back of his lawn mower before he leaves for vacation at the beach and hopes for their success, harvests his tomatoes, squash, cantaloupes in the cool of an August evening and hopes for the success of his bees, waits for a cool September weekend to collect his honey and finds that his bees only made about 10 pounds of honey, and BLAMES the queen producer who sold him the package of bees. In contrast, a beeKEEPER reads the writings of bee researchers and bee scientists and follows their new findings of management techniques, cares for the health of his bees by administering medical treatments that the scientists suggest and DO IT WHEN THE SCIENTIST SAYS TO DO IT, does not relegate his bee work to weekends but performs the needed work on what ever day is best for the bees, and attends bee meetings at many different sites to LEARN, LEARN, LEARN! What do you get for all this? Your reward is the self PRIDE of being successful, and enjoying the JOYS OF BEEKEEPING!”
    This simplification is so limited and narrow I am not even sure where to start hacking at it.....
    And so I wont.


    Not too much a fan of Mr. Imirie's sayings (nuclear physicist or not).
    Especially, granted he categorized himself into the higher cast of the beeKEEPERs, I presume.
    Sorry.


    PS: unsure how he would ever categorize the bee tree runners (if he even knew of their existence).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  7. #1146
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by BigBlackBirds View Post
    Seems odd but happens to me over and over to varying degrees.

    ...

    Now wait another 30 days and we start to see the first of the real summer honey flows around me. There can be some minors flows prior but the general flow where we produce honey runs from around first of July until 3rd week of August. Add those same boxes of foundation to hives across that flow and they are drawn and filled. My good drone source colonies (which serve for both mating yards and honey production) each can do 3 deep boxes of foundation year after year if I want.

    ...

    this year we had a good fall flow but most of those deeps were only partially (30-70%) drawn. i just leave them on hive over the winter and grab them next year. it does seem to cause the bees to jump on the boxes quicker the following year but not my first choice for comb drawing.
    BigBlackBirds:

    Thank you again for the excellent write-up. I took the opportunity to read your reply, marinate in it for awhile and then come back and re-read it. So if I were to summarize what you wrote (and please feel welcome to correct):

    1. In your experience, it is difficult to get early season comb drawn out, even with strong colonies and early nectar sources available.

    2. You've had good success getting surplus comb drawn out by your healthy hives in your main flow period.

    3. You've observed comb building during some fall flows but it has typically been only partially drawn.

    Accepting that we have very different flow profiles, where are you locating the empty boxes of foundation on your colonies during your summer flow that gets them drawn-out successfully? Directly above the brood nest?

    I did observe some comb building in a few colonies during our fall flow this year, and like you have observed it was only partially done.

    Thank you again for your help and input. I sincerely appreciate it!

    Russ

  8. #1147
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    This simplification is so limited and narrow I am not even sure where to start hacking at it.....
    And so I wont.
    GregV:

    I appreciate your feedback, and I do think I know where you are coming from.

    For me, I tend to hold to the idiom of 'chewing on the meat and spitting out the bones'- so while I may never adopt some of Mr. Imirie's central tenants I think there is still much to be learned from his extensive knowledge of bee behavior and manipulation techniques in a tightly-managed setting.

    More to the point of being a 'beeHAVER', I am certain I fit the definition though I take solace in the knowledge that George's most fundamental admonition toward upgrading to a 'beeKEEPER' was continuous learning and improving one's skills.

    In this, I think we all might agree- regardless of where our education ultimately leads us.

  9. #1148
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Clinton, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    442

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    BigBlackBirds:

    Thank you again for the excellent write-up. I took the opportunity to read your reply, marinate in it for awhile and then come back and re-read it. So if I were to summarize what you wrote (and please feel welcome to correct):

    1. In your experience, it is difficult to get early season comb drawn out, even with strong colonies and early nectar sources available.

    2. You've had good success getting surplus comb drawn out by your healthy hives in your main flow period.

    3. You've observed comb building during some fall flows but it has typically been only partially drawn.

    Accepting that we have very different flow profiles, where are you locating the empty boxes of foundation on your colonies during your summer flow that gets them drawn-out successfully? Directly above the brood nest?

    I did observe some comb building in a few colonies during our fall flow this year, and like you have observed it was only partially done.

    Thank you again for your help and input. I sincerely appreciate it!

    Russ
    I have the best luck with boxes directly above a brood nest both with and without an excluder. I generally have no problems using excluders on drawn comb for honey production but my observation with foundation is that the flow needs to be pretty strong if opt to use the excluder so often I dont put that on. Plus I don't use deeps for honey extraction so if they add pollen or lay in them I really don't care. If I have a fairly new started queen that is really going strong and has filled two boxes with brood (for me that means a May or early June mated queen that is still in full expansion mode by early July) my general thought is that you can get a deep box of foundation drawn faster without the excluder. Seems that they will go up and make some comb to give her more space in the third box--find most queens only use a small part of that box anyway and eventually she gets pushed back into the two main boxes by time i want that box for something else. However, deeps are heavy so I dont like manipulating them alot. If I'm adding a 2nd deep to be drawn I'll often pop the newly drawn box off and "bottom super" the hive with the next box of foundation and then throw the drawn box back on top of everything. But once two are drawn, anything else is thrown on the top as I don't care to handle them anymore than needed. I've also had pretty decent luck adding a box of foundation to a new queen that is still in a single. They will be pressed for space and draw her comb but my bees tend to struggle more drawing like that as a single only has so many resources to use compared to how many bees you have in a bigger unit.

    If I want to draw spring comb before main flow, I tend to add foundation into the nest. For me that has been the best option to draw early in the year. However, its not my preferred route because I find it to be 1) rather limited process of getting 1-2-3 frames compared to a full box, 2) requires more manipulation and time to get good frames drawn.

    Here is how it does work for me. Timing wise this is when we are going into the transition from spring to summer. Basically in late April here as I'm prepping overwintered bees for sale. I'll use about 6 frames of brood completely covered with bees in a single deep box with foundation on the very outsides of the nest and honey frames being out farther against the walls. Normally i will have also dumped more bees into the box that were left over from nucs that are being sold (as you can only get so many bees into a 5 frame cardboard nuc box). So we are talking about a pretty jammed single. As those bees go into the full spring craziness of expansion (and that is what overwintered queens are known for) they'll readily draw the outside foundation as they have no place else to move and without a box on top to move up horizontal is the only option remaining. The downside is that you generally have to go back and turn the frames as they tend to work both frames at one time but only one side at a time so you have to swap it around for them if you want to speed up the process (the part where it takes time and is still slow drawing even with lots of bees). In some instances I will add a 3rd piece of foundation right between the brood frames. Often this works but I'm not a great fan of breaking up the nest AND i find that often i forget about that frame and assume it is nicely drawn but later find out that it was still only partially drawn (which annoys me alot!). And it works for me before they have become so congested that they want to swarm. I find the window of opportunity is pretty narrow.

    Hope that gives you some more ideas

  10. #1149
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by BigBlackBirds View Post
    I have the best luck with boxes directly above a brood nest both with and without an excluder.

    ...

    If I'm adding a 2nd deep to be drawn I'll often pop the newly drawn box off and "bottom super" the hive with the next box of foundation and then throw the drawn box back on top of everything. But once two are drawn, anything else is thrown on the top as I don't care to handle them anymore than needed.

    ...

    If I want to draw spring comb before main flow, I tend to add foundation into the nest. For me that has been the best option to draw early in the year. However, its not my preferred route because I find it to be 1) rather limited process of getting 1-2-3 frames compared to a full box, 2) requires more manipulation and time to get good frames drawn.

    ...

    I find the window of opportunity is pretty narrow.
    Thank you, BigBlackBirds. Your response is great and does give me some more ideas to consider. Succinctly, my thought all along has been in trying to devise a fairly straightforward and fairly predictable method to get whole boxes of comb drawn and systematically rotated out, something akin to Abbe Warre's nadiring method. As such, I started by nadiring (or under-supering) and empty box to the very bottom of the stack early in the season (among other times) and hoped that the colonies would draw this space out (with little success).

    If I understood your response correctly, it sounds that if you want to get worker-cell comb drawn out for use in the brood nest you start by:

    Box #1- a box of foundation installed directly above the active level of the broodnest.

    Box #2- a box of foundation installed on the bottom board with the original brood box directly above this, and Box #1 directly above this.

    Box #3 (and subsequent)- a box of foundation installed at the top of the stack.

    If I have interpreted this manipulation sequence correctly, the part I am intrigued by is Box #2- why do you under-super it below the brood nest? Is it a function of seasonal progression? Have you found this is more effective than simply continuing to install the new box directly above the active nest line?

    I am resigned to the fact that it may not be as simple as simply adding an empty box in the right location at the right time, but I (probably like most) am looking to minimize the amount of broodnest manipulations I need to make during the flow for all the obvious reasons.

    Thank you again for your helpful information- I appreciate you taking the time to explain your process.

    Russ

  11. #1150
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Clinton, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    442

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    Thank you, BigBlackBirds. Your response is great and does give me some more ideas to consider. Succinctly, my thought all along has been in trying to devise a fairly straightforward and fairly predictable method to get whole boxes of comb drawn and systematically rotated out, something akin to Abbe Warre's nadiring method. As such, I started by nadiring (or under-supering) and empty box to the very bottom of the stack early in the season (among other times) and hoped that the colonies would draw this space out (with little success).

    If I understood your response correctly, it sounds that if you want to get worker-cell comb drawn out for use in the brood nest you start by:

    Box #1- a box of foundation installed directly above the active level of the broodnest.

    Box #2- a box of foundation installed on the bottom board with the original brood box directly above this, and Box #1 directly above this.

    Box #3 (and subsequent)- a box of foundation installed at the top of the stack.

    If I have interpreted this manipulation sequence correctly, the part I am intrigued by is Box #2- why do you under-super it below the brood nest? Is it a function of seasonal progression? Have you found this is more effective than simply continuing to install the new box directly above the active nest line?

    I am resigned to the fact that it may not be as simple as simply adding an empty box in the right location at the right time, but I (probably like most) am looking to minimize the amount of broodnest manipulations I need to make during the flow for all the obvious reasons.

    Thank you again for your helpful information- I appreciate you taking the time to explain your process.

    Russ
    Hi Russ
    Sorry, i wasn't real clear on how place box #2 of foundation normally.

    Once we get into the season and things are rolling along, I seldom go into the actual brood nest area of a production or drone source hive unless something is wrong. My brood nest area is typically bottom two boxes (unless I'm running a single deep with an excluder which isn't uncommon either) and I just let them be. It's enough work to pull honey off a yard one time late in the summer to extract it; I don't have much desire to pull boxes off prior to extraction just to take a peek at things and then have to replace all those boxes. Even if the colonies don't have deeps on to draw comb they probably have 5-7 medium honey supers instead. I just keeps bees as a hobby these days and have fairly limited time available to work them so I need to be as efficient as possible. That first box of foundation simply goes onto the two brood box stack so now the hive is likely three deeps high. When it is drawn or nearly so, I just pop it off for a second and add the next box of foundation in the exact place where the first box of foundation was placed directly above the two brood boxes and then I stack the drawn/partially drawn box on top of it. So now we have a four stack high colony---two brood boxes on bottom, box of new foundation directly above the nest and then the newly drawn box on the very top. Given that I'm inclined to just throw a third box of foundation on top the entire pile, there should be no problem just plopping the 2nd box of foundation right on top of the first one that was drawn. I just make the swap out of habit.

  12. #1151
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by BigBlackBirds View Post
    So now we have a four stack high colony---two brood boxes on bottom, box of new foundation directly above the nest and then the newly drawn box on the very top. Given that I'm inclined to just throw a third box of foundation on top the entire pile, there should be no problem just plopping the 2nd box of foundation right on top of the first one that was drawn. I just make the swap out of habit.
    BigBlackBirds:

    Thank you for the reply- your response clarified things nicely. I really do appreciate you taking the time to explain your approach in such detail.

    I will also apologize for my delay in reply as I have been away on vacation.

    Thanks again for the great information. Have a great week.

    Russ

  13. #1152
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    If I were asked to summarize his recommendations as succinctly as possible, I would outline them thus:

    9. Avoid anthropomorphic thinking when considering colony dynamics.
    Mr. Imirie writes often of the concept of Anthropomorphic thinking- which is defined by Merriam-Webster’s as, "ascribing human characteristics to nonhuman things."

    George’s basic premise is encapsulated in this axiom, “… we must realize that our only course of becoming a good beekeeper is to LEARN TO THINK LIKE A BEE, or study what researchers call ‘BEE BEHAVIOR’.”

    In very basic terms, he is reminding us that bees are ultimately motivated by a very different set of innate behaviors which are ultimately derived from both their biology and the external stimuli rather than by the myriad factors which guide human reasoning and decision-making. His point is that if we will become students of 'bee behavior', we can better harness these inherent responses to our benefit. Conversely, if we approach beekeeping expecting colonies to think and reason like humans, we will be surprised (and no doubt disappointed) with the result.

    He expounds extensively on this concept in the following three (3) ‘Pink Pages’:

    http://pinkpages.chrisbacherconsulti...ntle_Bees.html
    http://pinkpages.chrisbacherconsulti...pomorphic.html
    http://pinkpages.chrisbacherconsulti...ike_a_Bee.html

    Here is a brief synopsis of his thesis:

    “Honey bees don't think like humans, nor do they understand ANGER, KINDNESS, GIFTS, STEALING, CHEATING, INDIVIDUALITY, LOAFING, RETIREMENT or DEATH. Hence, one of the major mistakes made by bee novices is being anthropomorphic, i.e., ascribing human characteristics to nonhuman things. Bees think like bees, not like humans! You have to learn to think like a bee, because a bee can never learn to think like a human. Honey bees do have brains, but their knowledge was "put there when they were CREATED", and they have minimal learning ability in their short six weeks of life. From the very instant that they emerge from their wax cell, they know WHAT to do, WHEN to do it, and HOW to do it! They do NOT have to be taught, shown, or supervised! In contrast, I hope that I can tell you WHAT you can do and not do, WHEN to do it and not to, and HOW to do it as well as HOW NOT to do it.”

  14. #1153
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Geauga, Ohio
    Posts
    430

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    I think of the bees' thinking as more like rule-followers; and it's my job to figure out the rules. As well as the exceptions.

    So robbing isn't "naughty" or anything value-laden, just a behavior triggered by 1) unguarded sugar source and 2) many foragers out of work due to a dearth.

    Put on top of that, some colonies have a high inclination to "look for trouble" and others "mind their own business" longer. Or it could be phrased that some colonies have a higher level of sending out foragers despite little being brought in, and so are the first to exploit a situation that leads to robbing behavior. There is likely a heritable component to this trait.

    It's hard not to feel sympathy for those hard-working foragers, since empathy is a human emotion that we can extend to non-humans, like bees and cars and robots. But I do recognize that they don't feel existential angst about their lot in life.

  15. #1154
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,161

    Default Re: Treatment-Free Bungling 2018 - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by trishbookworm View Post
    I think of the bees' thinking as more like rule-followers; and it's my job to figure out the rules. As well as the exceptions.
    Trish:

    Thank you for your reply. I was glad to see your post. You explained what I was attempting to in a more succinct and much clearer way than I did- so for that I thank you!

    In my personal experience it is equal parts maddening and fun to run up on something totally unexpected and attempt to ascertain what the bees were 'thinking'.

    9 times out of 10, it becomes painfully obvious to me that beekeeper error is to blame- the other 1 out of 10 I chalk up to 'bees being bees'... but truth be known it's probably my fault too and I am just not smart enough to diagnose the problem I created .

    Thank you again for your reply- I really appreciate it!

    Russ

Page 58 of 58 FirstFirst ... 848565758

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •