Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Feb 2012
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    West Bath, Maine, United States
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    2,729

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee's Bees LLC View Post
    Perhaps, but it wasn't like they bought out a serious contender in the bee industry.
    It is not what they have accomplished to date; it is what is their plan.
    It is hard to design a safety net that some will not use as a hammock.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Concord, VT,USA
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    143

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Vance G View Post
    I think the current bee mania is ending.
    You nailed it... I have been lurking on this site for a dozen years or more and an active beekeeper for the past six. It didn't matter what time of day or night i logged-in, there were at least 100 or more people here. That number has dropped precipitously. My apologies to the site's administrators.... It turns out beekeeping is very expensive, very tedious, and the results often lackluster. I think we have passed "peak beekeeping".
    7 years; 3 colonies.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
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    1,686

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Beerz View Post
    It turns out beekeeping is very expensive, very tedious, and the results often lackluster. I think we have passed "peak beekeeping".
    If this turns out to be true, I hope they were good enough to have made some real honey and acquired a taste for the same.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Manning, SC
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    5,247

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Beerz View Post
    You nailed it... I have been lurking on this site for a dozen years or more and an active beekeeper for the past six. It didn't matter what time of day or night i logged-in, there were at least 100 or more people here. That number has dropped precipitously. My apologies to the site's administrators.... It turns out beekeeping is very expensive, very tedious, and the results often lackluster. I think we have passed "peak beekeeping".
    There are other reasons for the drop in attendance since Barry sold the site. Beekeeping classes are still relatively full.
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  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    North Alabama
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    124

    Default

    I have a number of hobbies and in my case beekeeping is not crazy expensive, far from tedious, and I find it very rewarding. I am a backyard beekeeper not looking to go commercial and really find it very relaxing. I am a serious hunter, and I have 2 boats and a few jet skis. In a month I can spend more on fuel than starting from scratch with bees. My deer lease per year is far more than starting beekeeping as a hobbyist. My seed and fertilizer bill each year for my lease is around 2 grand. All of this to say, I could buy local honey, rent boats, and buy venison. But where is the fun in that? I go to the bee club meetings and notice the majority of the members are older. In the last 18 months I have seen a number of younger people getting into the hobby as a hobby not a commercial opportunity. I do work with someone who is going into the commercial side. They just ordered 100 deep boxes, and 200 medium boxes to start. I am sure their experience will be different from mine.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
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    290

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    "The hobbyist portion IS a huge majority of the industry.
    We will stick with making everything in house as always."

    "For extractors maybe as even the 10 hive backyarder needs ONE."

    Nope, MAXANT is correct. Small beekeepers have been the bread and butter for most all beekeeping suppliers for decades.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    lake hopatcong nj
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    864

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    "It turns out beekeeping is very expensive, very tedious, and the results often lackluster."

    I have to agree with Haveuseen1. I have multiple hobbie$ (you see what I did there?) guitars, cameras, hunting and fishing gear. Beekeeping is the only one that puts money back into the hobby to offset the cost. And I hope that as I get better and more efficient maybe even pay off the past years and make a little profit as well moving forward.

    it certainly hasn't been easy and it is slow and steady progress. Perhaps the drop off is from the "drop out rate" from the hobbyists that thought they would just stick a bunch of bugs in a box and come back a few weeks later and get honey. or the folks that get a couple hives to pollinate their garden and save the bees. Maybe bad for the beekeeping supply industry but also maybe good for beekeeping in general?

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    2,108

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    I am waiting to see what the membership numbers are for Metro in 2019, we have had explosive growth for several years, older members have retired from the hobby but younger ones have continued to join.

    I think beekeeping has better staying power than many hobbies.

    And as forums go, Beesource is still the top of the heap. (and it belongs there)
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
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    3,112

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Madsen View Post
    Perhaps Mann Lake will improve their shipping costs.
    Free isn't good enough?
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania/Florida
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    483

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Beerz View Post
    You nailed it... I have been lurking on this site for a dozen years or more and an active beekeeper for the past six. It didn't matter what time of day or night i logged-in, there were at least 100 or more people here. That number has dropped precipitously. My apologies to the site's administrators.... It turns out beekeeping is very expensive, very tedious, and the results often lackluster. I think we have passed "peak beekeeping".
    I think easy access to multiple forums via facebook is what's leading to the decline of attendance on this site. Facebook groups are much easier to access on a mobile device and much more conveniet. I myself only login to this site with my computer at work due to the awkwardness of the mobile version.

    Aaron

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Aroostook, ME, USA
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    I wonder if the buyouts will put an end to the Black Friday sales?

  13. #32
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    Nov 2009
    Location
    Manning, SC
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    5,247

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by NorthMaine View Post
    I wonder if the buyouts will put an end to the Black Friday sales?
    I doubt it. ML and others still make a nice profit even with the discount. Besides, it’s great PR.
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  14. #33
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    Sep 2013
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    Knoxville, Tennessee, USA
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    671

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by snl View Post
    I doubt it. ML and others still make a nice profit even with the discount. Besides, it’s great PR.
    I doubt it too. There's still competition between vendors and like you said, money to be made.
    Beekeeping 6 Years - 12 production hives and about 12 nucs - Treatment OAV Only

  15. #34
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    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    3,291

    Default

    Ever since Walter t Kelley passed away the bussiness kinda lost it's way, passed around 3 or 4 times. The recent buyer before Mann lake invested heavily in improving the facilities in Clarkson. They built a brand new air conditioned warehouse and new shop spaces. Extremely nice. Also a new website design.

    The people are still the same and will likely still continue. Overall I feel like it's a good thing, but it's kinda sad to be loosing the Kelley name, a local Kentucky "mom and pop" bee bussiness right in my backyard.

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
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    1,375

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by MAXANT View Post
    The hobbyist portion IS a huge majority of the industry.
    We will stick with making everything in house as always.
    I am shopping! I either cut my hive numbers, pay for extraction or borrow a bigger one (again)
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  17. #36
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    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    Default

    Dadant warehouse in Frankfort, Kentucky doesn't even come close to providing the same service and products as Kelley headquarters in Clarkson. I can literally walk into the wood shop and watch the frames and boxes being milled at Kelley's. I understand Dadant is just a satellite location here but it's not anywhere close to Kelley's headquarters.

  18. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Campbell River, BC, CA
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    1,841

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Beerz View Post
    It turns out beekeeping is very expensive, very tedious, and the results often lackluster.
    Expensive ??? Have you ever had a hobby that's actually expensive ? In my younger days, spent a lot of weekends at the track as a participant. Later on I got tired of that game, took up aviation. When I couldn't afford to keep the airplane running anymore, sold it and bought a sailboat. I could go on.

    Bees were the least expensive hobby start we have ever made, cost under a grand to get a decent start. Over time we learned a lot about how to keep bees, then when we moved and bought a small acreage, we ramped up the bee hobby considerably, now it's actually a small business that makes a decent return. But much like everything else in life, you get out of it what you put in. Lackluster results are usually indicative of lackluster input.

    I am actively involved in the local bee club. When we started with this club 5 years ago after moving here, first meeting we went to had about 30 folks attending, and it's grown substantially over the last 5 years. We see two types of new folks each and every year. Behind door number one is the folks that arrive with an attitude of 'going to learn all about this', and behind door number two is the folks that want to 'save the bees'. Invariably, those behind door 2 are not intending to be beekeepers at all, they want to be 'bee havers', so they set boxes in the back yard, populate them with nucs or packages, then stand back and wait to save the bees. It doesn't work that way. The other half get the same start, but, they pay attention at club meetings when the folks that have been doing this for a few years talk about how they manage a bee colony to produce a desired result, then they go back home and implement what they have learned.

    Today club membership is over a hundred, of those, at least 70 are actively keeping bees. We've seen a considerable number show up for a year or two, then quietly disappear. Most of them tended to be of the 'save the bees' mindset, and bought the bad information being peddled online regarding some special super bee that can survive in our climate if you just leave it in the boxes and do nothing to manage your stock. I heard it best described at a recent bee conference, one of the presenters who works at the same lab as Samuel mentioned in other thread here had some slides up where a phrase was emphasized. 'DONT LET THE INTERNET KILL YOUR BEES'.

    I think the recent bee mania has attracted a lot of folks to beekeeping as a rewarding hobby, and breathed new young blood into the ranks. When we joined our first bee club 8 years ago, my wife and I were by far the youngsters in the crowd. Today, the average age of our local bee club is probably half our age, and many of them have kept bees successfully now for 3 or 4 years. Last year I attended a meeting of our original club from the area we were in before the move, demographic change there is much the same. At the same time, the number of 'bee havers' that attend has dropped dramatically, so in that respect, I think the mania has peaked and is on the decline, but over it's run has breathed a lot of life into beekeeping as a hobby.

    As for dropping attendance at this site, I used to be a very regular reader here, not so much anymore. The reason is quite strait forward, over time the agenda here go more or less completely hijacked by the 'treatment free' zealots that just cannot refrain from posting drivel into a thread that has nothing to do with their agenda. Over time, that drove a lot of folks that have a different agenda to the door. I see little / no posting from commercial beekeepers that are serious about producing honey as a livelihood these days. 8 years ago, I took a lot of good info from those folks, they were posting here every day. My agenda with our bees is very strait forward and easy to understand. We require a minimum of a thousand pounds of honey in bottles at the end of the season to make this worth the effort, and have our production target for next year set at twice the number. I own a farm, and my bees are livestock we keep to produce one of our products. I absolutely will not let the internet kill my bees, but if I take heed of much of the advice from prolific posters here, that's exactly what will happen. Over time, I think attendance has dropped because those bent on keeping bees productively have come to that same conclusion, and many that drank to much of the kool-aid no longer have bees. It's kind of a double edged sword, goes back a few years, but the preponderance of TF proselytizing over time has culled the readership on both ends of the spectrum.

    It's really to bad, this site used to be one of my more valuable sources of beekeeping information, not so much anymore.

  19. #38
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    Mar 2013
    Location
    Seattle WA
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    1,247

    Default Re: Mann Lake acquires Kelley Beekeeping

    Quote Originally Posted by grozzie2 View Post
    As for dropping attendance at this site, I used to be a very regular reader here, not so much anymore. The reason is quite strait forward, over time the agenda here go more or less completely hijacked by the 'treatment free' zealots that just cannot refrain from posting drivel into a thread that has nothing to do with their agenda. Over time, that drove a lot of folks that have a different agenda to the door. I see little / no posting from commercial beekeepers that are serious about producing honey as a livelihood these days. 8 years ago, I took a lot of good info from those folks, they were posting here every day. My agenda with our bees is very strait forward and easy to understand. We require a minimum of a thousand pounds of honey in bottles at the end of the season to make this worth the effort, and have our production target for next year set at twice the number. I own a farm, and my bees are livestock we keep to produce one of our products. I absolutely will not let the internet kill my bees, but if I take heed of much of the advice from prolific posters here, that's exactly what will happen. Over time, I think attendance has dropped because those bent on keeping bees productively have come to that same conclusion, and many that drank to much of the kool-aid no longer have bees. It's kind of a double edged sword, goes back a few years, but the preponderance of TF proselytizing over time has culled the readership on both ends of the spectrum.
    That may be part of it but I think there are many other reasons. We have a local beekeeping forum that used to have lots of posters but it too has very little happening the last couple of years. It has not had the treatment free vs the pro treatment arguments going on but the results are the same. Technology changes as do peoples choices for getting information. There are now more groups on Facebook and lots of other sites where you can get the information you want. People also get tired of reading the same old questions every day. How many times in the last year has the question "What is the best way to treat for varroa" been asked? It would also not surprise me to find out that the younger beekeepers are much better at searching for the answers that are already here, rather than asking the same old questions again and again.

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