clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience - Page 9
Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 78910 LastLast
Results 161 to 180 of 198
  1. #161
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
    Posts
    556

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    CLong:

    Thank you for your replies- I sincerely appreciate you clarifying your current set-up and I will be interested to see how your side-by-side comparison of vented versus non-vented tops turns out next year.

    The idea of simplicity has really hit home for me this year while bumbling my way through expanding the apiary. While having all these gadgets really appeals to my analytical bent toward optimization, the practical aspects of timely management and labor efficiency quickly becomes an important (and competing) factor.

    I see now the appeal to 10-frame deeps, solid bottoms and migratory covers- less moving parts.
    Russ, At some point, if/When you start making your own wooden ware, the simpler the better. So understand the bees needs and your needs then use your analytical aptitude to sketch /design the parts , cut them out build/ paint etc. Pm Me if you want some pics and Ideas. I now have 1/2 and 1/2 8 frame and 10 frame. After grabbing a 10 frame of Honey a few dozen times the 20% reduction in weight and size has helped a lot. I also noted at times the 10 frame boxes in the spring had the bees right to the top and honey in frame 1, and 10 where they went up the center. The 8 frame gear has less of this chimney effect, however on really good laying queens it is no problem to get 32 frames of bees prior to honey flow. Remember your tree at work, bees will be fine in a hollow tree or wall, your plans just need to be more manageable than a tree. with that goal it seems easier to design. Have fun
    GG

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #162
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Gray Goose View Post
    Russ, At some point, if/When you start making your own wooden ware, the simpler the better. So understand the bees needs and your needs then use your analytical aptitude to sketch /design the parts , cut them out build/ paint etc. Pm Me if you want some pics and Ideas. I now have 1/2 and 1/2 8 frame and 10 frame. After grabbing a 10 frame of Honey a few dozen times the 20% reduction in weight and size has helped a lot. I also noted at times the 10 frame boxes in the spring had the bees right to the top and honey in frame 1, and 10 where they went up the center. The 8 frame gear has less of this chimney effect, however on really good laying queens it is no problem to get 32 frames of bees prior to honey flow. Remember your tree at work, bees will be fine in a hollow tree or wall, your plans just need to be more manageable than a tree. with that goal it seems easier to design. Have fun
    GG
    GG:

    Thank you for the very generous offer- I really appreciate that, and might just take you up on it.

    If pressed today, I think I would continue to remain standardized around the 8-frame Langstroth Medium dimensions, maybe out of no other reason but stubbornness. That said, I have been pleasantly surprised with several (but not all) the aspects of the homemade Warre hives I picked-up this year, namely:

    Standard non-painted 2X lumber. Looks like one could abstract this for standard Langstroth Mediums using #2 Grade 2X8's. The bodies themselves are butt-jointed and fastened together with deck screws and your frame ledge would be the only dado cut you would have to make.

    Standard 1/2 plywood for bottom board and inner cover- maybe ditch the inner cover in favor of propolized burlap.

    Single round entrance opening drilled in the middle front face of each hive body, sloped slightly downward.

    For a lid- maybe a modified migratory lid (possibly with aluminum sheathing) with extra depth for rigid foam and/or the possibility of adjustable top ventilation.

    That said, I am going to focus first on filling-up the woodenware I have now... which might take awhile.

    Thanks again for the advice and offer of help. I do appreciate it.

    Have a great weekend.

    Russ

  4. #163
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    6/14/19 Hive Report

    Three hives were opened. Piper (1803) was harvested taking advantage of an usually cool morning of 54 degrees to utilize an escape board. The escape was on for only 18 hours. About 30% of the bees remained in the supers when they were removed. Only 3 supers were taken off, one being 1/2 full.
    Four honey frames were harvested from Paradise (1811).

    Piper yielded 63 lbs, and Paradise, 12 lbs.

    The honey from both hives was at 16% H2O. My trainee brought two frames from his hives which measured 20%. We decided to harvest his frames, and after mixing in the extractor the honey came out at 18.5%. Hopefully, it won't ferment. It is interesting that his honey was taken from non-insulated hives. Piper and Paradise are both insulated top to bottom. Perhaps the insulation really does help in drying the nectar.

    This year I tried putting the extractor on a four-wheeled dolly, with an elevated clamped on top. It worked better than expected.

    Extractor Buggy 2.jpg

    The other hive inspected was 1901 (Westley). The telescoping lid had been pulled off a couple times in the last 10 days, but every time it was raised, the bees would come boiling out of the standard inner cover. These bees seemed mean. I was suited up head to toe this time, so I decided to take a look again. Again, they boiled out, and managed to sting me in the ankle after only being open for 10 seconds. These bees are mean. I had honey to spin out, so I closed it back up. It looks like I will need to requeen this one.

    This is the best honey harvest I have had, so I am very thankful. Next year I hope to extract in the 200-300 lb range.

  5. #164
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    CLong:

    Good update- looks like you had some capable help with your extraction efforts. Glad to see it is a family venture.

    Best of luck in the second half of the season.

    Russ

  6. #165
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    CLong:

    Good update- looks like you had some capable help with your extraction efforts. Glad to see it is a family venture.

    Best of luck in the second half of the season.

    Russ
    Russ,

    I hope your season finishes out well too. Thankfully, my girls put up with me. And I don't mean the bees.

  7. #166
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by clong View Post
    Russ,

    I hope your season finishes out well too. Thankfully, my girls put up with me. And I don't mean the bees.
    I completely understand- with my wife, five daughters and now a female cat I am vastly outnumbered!

  8. #167
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    I don't post too much in the way of research, but my wife sent me an interesting link this morning concerning the role of RNA in honey bee colonies. I think it might have implications regarding treatment-free beekeeping, and queen-rearing. I'm still trying to digest it and understand it. I haven't read the source documents yet, but here it is: If anyone one cares to write a summary on it, please be my guest! :-)

    https://answersingenesis.org/creepy-...-bee-medicine/

  9. #168
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by clong View Post
    I don't post too much in the way of research, but my wife sent me an interesting link this morning concerning the role of RNA in honey bee colonies. I think it might have implications regarding treatment-free beekeeping, and queen-rearing. I'm still trying to digest it and understand it. I haven't read the source documents yet, but here it is: If anyone one cares to write a summary on it, please be my guest! :-)

    https://answersingenesis.org/creepy-...-bee-medicine/
    Great article, CLong. I enjoyed the read- amazing stuff! Two things stood out to me:

    Ingested miRNAs could confer immunity not only to the bees that ingested it but also to the entire hive. It could be spread to both other adult bees and the larval brood by trophallaxis.

    Larvae fed on beebread are destined to become sterile worker bees. It turns out that these plant miRNAs in the beebread are preventing the larvae from developing into queens.

    For my part, it is hard not to observe the fingerprints of creative influence while participating in even a casual study of biology.

  10. #169
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    7/6/19 Hive Report

    Went out to the beeyard with the intent to locate the queen in Piper. The plan was to mark her and move some eggs into an 8-frame nuc to make some queen cells. There was a fair amount of closed brood, but no open brood. 75% of the frames in the brood chamber were examined. Each of the other hives I investigated had open brood. Apparently, the queen is taking a break

    Westley, the "mean" hive was much better behaved today, so it gets to keep its queen for now.

  11. #170
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by clong View Post
    Apparently, the queen is taking a break

    Westley, the "mean" hive was much better behaved today, so it gets to keep its queen for now.
    Good update, CLong. I had a similar experience a couple weeks ago regarding finding no open brood in a colony and wrongly concluding they were queenless. Hopefully Piper is simply responding to forage availability and biding their time.

    Has Westley been persistently 'mean' or is this a recent occurrence?

    Good luck to you in the second half of the year.

    Russ

  12. #171
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,713

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Chris, I had a similar experience this weekend in one of the hives I inspected. Capped brood on several frames and eggs everywhere, but very little open brood, maybe half a frame total. Figure she took a breather as the flow tapered off. Never seen so many eggs in one hive before. Put feeders on several of the hives and set out the pollen sub to help get things going again.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  13. #172
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    Good update, CLong. I had a similar experience a couple weeks ago regarding finding no open brood in a colony and wrongly concluding they were queenless. Hopefully Piper is simply responding to forage availability and biding their time.

    Has Westley been persistently 'mean' or is this a recent occurrence?

    Good luck to you in the second half of the year.

    Russ
    Russ,

    Thanks for the good wishes.

    Westley was mean for about 6 weeks running. As soon as I would lift the tele-cover the bees would come boiling out and start pinging me. I've detected faint skunk smells around the beeyard, but no signs of skunks in the beeyard. The last inspection, I used a little smoke, and they were fine.

  14. #173
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Chris, I had a similar experience this weekend in one of the hives I inspected. Capped brood on several frames and eggs everywhere, but very little open brood, maybe half a frame total. Figure she took a breather as the flow tapered off. Never seen so many eggs in one hive before. Put feeders on several of the hives and set out the pollen sub to help get things going again.
    JW, its reassuring to hear you and others are seeing the same. I don't worry over my hives as much as I used to, but it is still tempting to dive in and "do something." My wife says "do nothing." So now I split the difference.

  15. #174
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by clong View Post
    JW, its reassuring to hear you and others are seeing the same. I don't worry over my hives as much as I used to, but it is still tempting to dive in and "do something." My wife says "do nothing." So now I split the difference.
    I love this- I can totally identify with this sentiment. One time last year my wife asked me, 'why are you feeding bees'? I instantly recognized the wisdom in this, allowing plenty of room for the need to feed periodically when necessary... but often, less is most certainly more.

    Glad to hear that Westley has settled-down- maybe it was in fact as straightforward as pest stress?

  16. #175
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    I just got a chance to look at this thread. I haven't gotten to read the paper yet.

    https://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...29#post1742229

    The paper reminded me of two things.

    Bee mite:
    My trainee just did a mite wash on his two hives which are descendants of my longest-surviving queen. (Elijah) Both hives came in at 1% mites.

    Bee might:
    I also built and installed my first prototype robber screen in preparation for the dearth. It was installed late in the evening. Five minutes later there was a bee hauling a cockroach up the screen. The roach must have been 3x longer than the bee.

  17. #176
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    [QUOTE=clong;1742311]

    Bee mite:

    Bee might:

    Nice turn-of-phrase- good to hear your progeny is expressing low mite counts. Bodes well for your efforts.

    I too am looking forward to reading the 'mite bomb' article. When you get a few robbing screens built, you should post a couple of pictures for ideas.

    Keep up the good work-

    Russ

  18. #177
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    7/27/19 Report

    This spring, I checkerboarded hive #1803 Piper, using Walt Wright’s method, and inserted a couple frames using Matt Davey’s OSBN technique . One of the things Walt Wright observed, was that often the queen was superseded during the process; even if the queen was laying well.

    Last Saturday, I attempted to find the queen in Piper. This was the fourth time I had tried this season. She was finally located on the last frame inspected – a honey frame. The queen was unmarked. Finding the queen had been replaced was confirmation of another of Mr. Wright’s observations.

    One of the consequences was that the hive was open for a long time. Between 20-30 minutes. A robbing frenzy erupted. It was alarming. I installed a robbing screen I had made on the most vulnerable hive (I'll include pics in another post), and proceeded to cover every hive with tarps and sheets. It was eerie how when one hive was covered, the cloud of robbers would quickly converge on an adjacent hive. This would be one argument for widely-spaced hives. My hives are behind a bear fence, so I’ll continue to keep them in one area, but I may at least reconfigure the yard for better spacing.

  19. #178
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Robber screen and hive body:

    The robber screen referenced in post #177 is below:

    Robber Screen 1.jpgRobber Screen doors.jpgRobber screen inside.jpg

    I'm not satisfied with the doors. I would like one that slides, but I haven't figured out how to do it yet.

    I've also attached a picture of the roughed-up interior of a hive body that has been on a hive for 3 months. There really isn't very much propolis. The bees only coated the areas that have scaly or "hairy" surfaces. It was roughed up with 24-grit sanding disk. If anyone has suggestions on how to rough up the walls so that the bees are more inclined to deposit propolis, I would be grateful.

    Hive body propolis.jpg
    Last edited by clong; 07-30-2019 at 01:05 PM.

  20. #179
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by clong View Post
    If anyone has suggestions on how to rough up the walls so that the bees are more inclined to deposit propolis, I would be grateful.
    CLong:

    Good to hear your update- and sorry about the robbing. This is a very disconcerting thing to see first-hand.

    I could not open your photos, so you may have to reattach them?

    Regarding encouraging a propolis envelope, have you read the following paper? In it the researchers test various approaches and report the results:

    https://entomologytoday.org/2018/11/...r-hive-health/
    Attached Files Attached Files

  21. #180
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: clong 2018-2019 Treatment Free Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    CLong:

    I could not open your photos, so you may have to reattach them?

    Regarding encouraging a propolis envelope, have you read the following paper? In it the researchers test various approaches and report the results:

    https://entomologytoday.org/2018/11/...r-hive-health/
    Russ,

    I've read that paper. What I am failing to do is to get the surface roughed up properly. I think it is the hairy surface that gets the bees busy. The propolis photo I included show that the smooth-sided gouges don't get any attention. If I can ever find a cheap supply of rough-cut lumber, I'll be in business!

    I moved the photo links around. Apparently, that messes up the links. It should be fixed now. Thanks for pointing it out.

Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 78910 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •