He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Morris Plains, NJ USA
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    691

    Default He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Last week a novice beek friend who lives in Rhode Island sent me pics of the deeps and frames that he had stored in his shed earlier this year. He hadn't used BT even after my strong urging. Now those boxes and frames have been burned. Right up to the time when the deep was about to go into the fire and just two days after blasting them with a strong water hosing, a dozen or so white worms were continuing to emerge from the deep holes they had bored into the wood. The moth larvae had finished devouring the wax so they altered their diet to include wood. The birds and chipmunks thoroughly enjoyed eating the worms that had been blasted off with the hose.
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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
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    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    nasty buggers.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
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    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    I would say that was a proper infestation.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    lake hopatcong nj
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    864

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    I'm sure they now realize how inexpensive and easy it is to apply bt. It has pretty much become a habit for me to spray any frame before it gets stored. Even if I think it will just be for a couple weeks.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
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    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Boxes damaged by wax worms are unsightly, but they are still usable. If looking at the damaged area offends, use painters spackling compound to fill the indentions and then paint with a good quality exterior latex paint.
    42 + years - 24 colonies - IPM disciple - Naturally Skeptic

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Morris Plains, NJ USA
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    691

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    The box and some of the frames were burned mostly out of embarrassment. He didn't want other beeks to see his poor decision in ignoring sound advice. I hope he's reading this.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,733

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    I was given boxes that were every bit as bad as those. They cleaned up fine and now have colonies in them. Most of the frames were not worth saving as they had not been glued together in the first place. Interesting how they build their cocoons between the box and the end bars but not so much on the sides.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Greenwood, WI, USA
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    68

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    What is BT?
    Zone 4a

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
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    88

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    And a follow-up to alf1960's question - does it have to be BTa or is the more normal BT I can get from Home Depot or Tractor Supply good enough?

  11. #10
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    Jul 2013
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    Morris Plains, NJ USA
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    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Alf- BT is bacillus thuringus or something very close to that. It's at every garden center and used for moth control. It gets heavily diluted with water and sprayed with a spray bottle.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    Greenwood, WI, USA
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    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete O View Post
    Alf- BT is bacillus thuringus or something very close to that. It's at every garden center and used for moth control. It gets heavily diluted with water and sprayed with a spray bottle.
    Thankyou.
    Zone 4a

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
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    808

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    BTa, and you must be specific. BT will KILL bees, BTa will not and will kill the WM larva. XENTARI on amazon prime
    Quote Originally Posted by alf1960 View Post
    Thankyou.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
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    5,583

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete O View Post
    Alf- BT is bacillus thuringus or something very close to that. It's at every garden center and used for moth control.
    I'll reinforce what vdotmatrix said, do not use the BT sold at garden centers. It's a different product. For beekeeping you must use Bacillus Thuringiensis Aizawai. BTA.

    https://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...ating-Wax-Moth
    To everything there is a season....

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ElDorado,Arkansas,USA
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    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Bta and Btk sold at garden centers will kill the same family of moth.Lepidoptera and doesnt harm bees.I have used both for over 38 years with good results.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Knoxville, Tennessee, USA
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    644

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    I believe the general thinking is that brood comb isn't safe without some protection. Comb that has only had honey in it is safe to store as long as the bees have cleaned it up a before storing. That's what I've observed as well.
    Beekeeping 6 Years - 12 production hives and about 12 nucs - Treatment OAV Only

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
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    8

    Default

    Last winter I placed my spare frames in a freezer for 2 weeks, then in an air tight bag over winter. Before using I placed them back in the freezer for 3-4 days.
    Is that acceptable also?
    I know, I know, typical question 😃

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Woodbridge, VA (But planning to move to NW Louisiana soon)
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    279

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Quote Originally Posted by Canning15420 View Post
    Last winter I placed my spare frames in a freezer for 2 weeks, then in an air tight bag over winter. Before using I placed them back in the freezer for 3-4 days.
    Is that acceptable also?
    I know, I know, typical question ��
    I freeze frames too, before storing. But I've had moths chew through black plastic garbage bags to get at frames in my garage. This was brood comb. I plan to use BTa moving forward.

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Powhatan, Virginia, USA
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    360

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    What Snapper said +1.
    Be aware that because pesticides are regulated - the label is the law.
    The states regulate permissible uses, as example, remember that OA usage had to be permitted state by state.
    The labeling process is costly, beekeepers are a small part of the market so manufacturers have no incentive do the permitting.
    Also XenTari is not labeled for usage with bees.
    The label lists vegetable and fruit varieties and numerous caterpillar types but not bees, hives, comb storage etc.
    Last edited by John Davis; 06-21-2019 at 08:45 AM.

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    ToweringOakFarm - Cleveland- Southern East Texas
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Gillmore View Post
    I'll reinforce what vdotmatrix said, do not use the BT sold at garden centers. It's a different product. For beekeeping you must use Bacillus Thuringiensis Aizawai. BTA.

    https://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...ating-Wax-Moth
    Thanks for this information. I didn't realize there were 2 versions of the BT product.

    Mike

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
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    Default Re: He didn't think BT was necessary for wax moths

    I will add that many people will say that they will also infest honey comb, not just brood comb. Has not happened to me, but some here will strongly disagree that they only use brood comb. J

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