Creamed Honey help
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  1. #1

    Default Creamed Honey help

    I have done my first attempt at making creamed honey ...
    I used a store bought batch of creamed honey
    and added a heaping tablespoon of it to an 8 oz. jar of my own ..
    I put them in the fridge for almost a week now and when cold they look perfect and are butter smooth the way i think it should be.
    Now that they are out of the fridge and back in the cellar , they are a touch more on the liquid side and not as " buttery consistancy" as i was hoping .

    ***
    The question is,,,, if I remove some from the 8 oz jar and add another dose of the bought "seed" honey , would that help ? Or am I too early to be judging my efforts and let it sit longer before sampling again.

    thanks for your replies.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
    Posts
    1,444

    Default Re: Creamed Honey help

    Have you looked up the Dyce Method for creamed honey. You may find answers there.

    How warm is it in your basement? I would think a cool basement would be ideal for storage.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  4. #3

    Default Re: Creamed Honey help

    basement holds at about 68 F.
    (it's on the high side of being a cool cellar)

    did just make a second batch of creamed honey
    using same bought starter. did 1lb "seed" to 10 8oz. jars. -- ( first batch was 12 jars to 1 lb.)
    definitely a noticeable difference in the consistency already ...the higher ratio may have been the trick .

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    279

    Default Re: Creamed Honey help

    As mentioned above, look up the Dyce Method.

    You need at least 10% starter, which I believe you have.
    The more you add, the faster it will set up.
    Temperature is critical, 57 F. is ideal so the closer you can get to that the better.
    Most refrigerators will be below 40 F. and that's too cold. It may seem like it's
    working because the cold honey is so think, but it will actually slow down the process.

    An old refrigerator can be modified with either a timer or thermostat to give you
    the temperature you want, but if you are just doing a few small batches that
    may not be possible.

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