Treatment Free in Finland - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    so true juhani and michael.

    very mild compared to both of your winters, which makes management much more forgiving for sure.

    the average temperature is just above what our canadian friends set their overwintering warehouses at.

    it's enough to get a couple months or more break in brood rearing, while still allowing for an occasional cleansing flight.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

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  3. #42

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Im not as slow adopter as Michael Palmer, but Instagram is something I have never done before. Web pages are great, and a must have to any business these days, but to put up-to-date information there is just too much work for me. We all try to make things easier as we get older. Instagram allows to make updates, pictures, videos and text very quickly. Not long ago I run into Sam Comfort Instagram page. Pictures and videos which tell more than thousand words and lots of discussion with followers. https://www.instagram.com/anarchyapiaries/

    Tadaa! Here it is: https://www.instagram.com/juhanilunden/

    Anyone out there who can put a comment or something is more than wellcome!! That would be a learning process for me.

  4. #43

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland


  5. #44
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    Juhani:

    I enjoyed reading your recent post. There were two things in particular that you mentioned that I am ruminating on:

    "What would be feasible, cost effective mite counting? I would say three mite counts during the main brood rearing season, one month or 6 weeks between the counts. This way the mite population increase can be counted. But even with this system there are flaws. Usually the swarming season and/or queen changes occur in this period. Every time there comes a new queen in the hive, arises the question: “How should the measured failure or success be counted in favor of the new queen versus the old queen?"

    "It seems that the limit of 5% has remained pretty much unchanged, although the percentage I was writing 2009 was from live bees. Im somewhat surprised that is has not got any lower during these 10 years. It might be the result of my reservations towards mite counting. Would the right conclusion be that my mite counting has had no effect? One could argue that 10 years with at least some meaningful mite counting the average should be lower. But would my bees be now softer against mites? Or is 5% natural limit in our climate? Lots of questions and no answers."

    Thanks for the update, and have a great evening.

    Russ

  6. #45

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Typical spring, no good cleansing flight days so far, but the bees which are in a hurry, come out every time when the wind calms and sun shines. Lately it has been very windy. Im running for membership in the Finnish Parliament, and it keeps me busy...

  7. #46
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    no cleansing flights yet? now that's 'real' winter.

    many thanks for the update juhani.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  8. #47
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    no cleansing flights yet? now that's 'real' winter.

    many thanks for the update juhani.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  9. #48
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    Im running for membership in the Finnish Parliament, and it keeps me busy...
    Wow! Please keep us updated Juhani
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  10. #49

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Wow! Please keep us updated Juhani
    I belonged to the 90% percentile who did not get elected. To get elected you need to make yourself famous some way, be known to a large group of people. TV, other media, or some profession/hobby where you meet a lot of people. Great experience, got to meet a lot of people whom I probably wouldt have met otherwise. And I got the opportunity to speak and write about issues important to me.

    To beekeeping: Cleansing flights are over and willow is already in full bloom! Record early. Some cities had over 19 C yesterday. Normal temperatures in April are around 8-10.

    4/15 dead hives in big ones, one of them was expected, others maybe mite and queen issues. ( I dont kill old queens, because they are the most valuable to breeding)
    11/24 dead in small hives, mostly because of weakness?, most of them died in March, they were not in contact with food, but Im not sure if hunger was the reason, because I fed all to same weight and the ones that are alive are doing fine which is shown that their bottoms had relatively few dead bees. Some had queen cells, they may have had too late queen change.

    I suspect the dead ones were weak in the first place, maybe had mite related problems, tried to compensate that with brood rearing and ended up using too much stores. Few of them I could have been able to save, by opening them in the early warm period of February. But obviously I haven't changed my working manners as much as the climate. I have had the policy of not opening hives before mid May. If a hive, which has been fed well in autumn, cannot make it that far, there is something wrong with their genes. But if the climate changes and makes the bees start brood rearing earlier, I have to reconsider that rule.

  11. #50
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    ... But if the climate changes and makes the bees start brood rearing earlier, I have to reconsider that rule.
    Too bad, Juhani, for not getting elected.
    On the other hand, you will keep beekeeping at your own pace - a good thing.

    In retrospect, looking at my losses this year I feel - it is a good thing to have a mix of different traits and not favor TOO much one or the other.
    But also make an effort to NOT rid of a trait that may not be looking very good at the moment.
    We need ALL of them for as long as they pass the ultimate test - stay alive.

    Depending on a particular winter particulars (which you never know beforehand) - a particular trait may benefit and other trait may be in disadvantage.
    You never know which one trait is best at the moment beforehand.
    Especially so since the winters are less predictable as we observe in real-time.
    Things are very fluid, but bees are fluid and will adjust too - given a chance.

    For example, some of my dead could be actually alive IF they took an extra opportunity in mid-winter to fly out (there were 1-2 moments where some bees did fly and others did not).
    Some bees did not fly - as that was just not their wintering trait - their were on the conservative side (generally beneficial and I considered a plus).
    Well, ultimately, the conservative bees overfilled and had diarrhea and perished to that (because the winter turned just a little too cold and too long and exceeded their natural limits).
    Last edited by GregV; 04-19-2019 at 09:58 AM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  12. #51

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Mini_plus 2019.jpg

    The mini-hives had perhaps not enough ventilation, some mold building. That is often connected to moisture and moisture is bad for wintering. There was a period of one month when the minihives were all covered with snow, after a heavy and windy storm. Not enough to cover the big ones.

  13. #52
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    Mini_plus 2019.jpg

    The mini-hives had perhaps not enough ventilation, some mold building.
    Not just ventilation what is important it is also the place where the condensation will appear. Bottom side of the insulation box should bi well isolated with ventilation holes and top side of the box should bi covered with less thick cover and then the condensation will occur there. Isolation material should be dry, not wet as it is in case of Warre quilt. (IMO)

  14. #53

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    The willow blooming has been phenomenal. Never before (since 1977) so early and seldom if ever so warm, calm and good weather to collect. By the looks of flight, more and more bees come home without pollen, a sign that the pollen stores are getting packed up. I havent opened hives yet, just the Mini-Plus hives got a quick check when bottoms were changed to summer model.

    Pictures taken half past 7 in the evening, temperature nearly 20C. Usually max of the day this time of year 10-12 C.
    Days will get longer until midsummer. Sommerdays, if sunny and warm, really are a work camp to bees in Finland, sun is up all day.



    Attachment 47851
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Juhani Lunden; 04-27-2019 at 12:02 PM.

  15. #54
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Juhani
    Sounds like the start of a really good year for you. I hope it keeps up.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  16. #55
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    The willow blooming has been phenomenal.
    The Russian sources report unusually large willow nectar flow this year in North-East region (aided by very favorable weather).
    People have been extracting significant willow honey - basically unheard of.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  17. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    By the looks of flight, more and more bees come home without pollen, a sign that the pollen stores are getting packed up.
    Juhani:

    Thank you for the update. It is always interesting to see how different the foraging dynamics are in different areas. You mention your colonies are foregoing pollen gathering already whereas we have had almost two months of off-and-on flying weather here and our colonies are still highly motivated by pollen gathering. I imagine your shorter relative season translates into a shorter but more intense pollen availability and corresponding foraging response?

  18. #57

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    Juhani:
    You mention your colonies are foregoing pollen gathering already whereas we have had almost two months of off-and-on flying weather here and our colonies are still highly motivated by pollen gathering.
    I imagine your shorter relative season translates into a shorter but more intense pollen availability and corresponding foraging response?
    The number of adult bees is at the lowest point at the moment. On the other hand the number of brood in various stages in very high compared to adult bees. More and more bees are needed to collect water. The growing brood area needs more warming. These facts slow down pollen gathering, but sometimes in weather like this there is simply shortage of space for pollen, which is stored near brood.

    I suppose what happens is that when a bee with pollen load comes home she might get a bit frustrated, because nobody is interested to take and help with storage. Finally, after some time passing, unloading is done to some remote corner. When she dances about where she was, only few is interested. These serve as impulses not to gather pollen any more, or concentrate more on honey.

    This situation changes when after couple weeks when number of adult bees is getting higher. I used to have a rule of thump: three weeks after willow blooming start there is a need to put first supers to the best hives. With TF bees this has changed: it takes six weeks. Two things come to this: hives are smaller and bees take out infested brood, which slows down development.


    Of course blooming of willow is getting over, pretty fast in weather like this, and dandelions are not yet open, but usually there are lots of cold icy corners in near by forests, which make the blooming last surprisingly long compared to flowers blooming in summer.
    Last edited by Juhani Lunden; 04-27-2019 at 11:00 PM.

  19. #58

    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    The Russian sources report unusually large willow nectar flow this year in North-East region (aided by very favorable weather).
    People have been extracting significant willow honey - basically unheard of.


    Same hear, basically unheard of.

    A strong hive might put up 10 kg weight in one day during willow blooming. All stores are usually consumed in the next cold spell, which can last until midsummer... who knows.

    Evolution has made willow one of the most rewarding flowers because usually bees take a huge risk when going out in cold and windy weather to pollinate.

  20. #59
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    The Russian sources report unusually large willow nectar flow this year in North-East region (aided by very favorable weather).
    People have been extracting significant willow honey - basically unheard of.
    I find your Russian information very interesting Greg. I knew the bees were bringing in pollen, but I didn't know it was so nectar rich.

  21. #60
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    Default Re: Treatment Free in Finland

    Quote Originally Posted by lharder View Post
    I find your Russian information very interesting Greg. I knew the bees were bringing in pollen, but I didn't know it was so nectar rich.
    Absolutely willow is a heavy nectar source.
    To be sure - there are several willow species - some are better than others in nectar flow.
    Norway maple too is a good nectar producer (and maybe other maples).

    The real issues why this is not known/ignored:
    - weather usually prevents heavy foraging of maples and willows anyway
    - bee colonies are usually too weak to take advantage of these early flows
    - beekeepers do not recognize maple and willow as a target crops (and don't prepare to harvest them specifically - setting up early-forager units)
    - and the weather, just to repeat, will usually cancel out the best possible preparations anyway

    And so, this year I hear those beekeepers who were ready on stand-by with strong work-forces got really, really lucky - pulling lots of willow honey (not much maple in that region).

    PS: my mistake - North-West Russia (not North-East, which is Siberia)
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

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