How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?
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  1. #1
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    Default How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    I am filling a large order for plastic squeeze bottles. What temperature should I heat the honey to delay granulation?
    All of my opinions and suggestions are based on my five decades of actual beekeeping,
    not so much on book learning, watching YouTube videos nor reading internet sites.

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  3. #2
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    Mar 2014
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    Milford, Michigan USA
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    You don’t say if the honey is to be sold as raw or not, if raw it is my understanding that 115 is the correct temp, that is what I use. If raw doesn’t matter then 160 is the commercial temp to pasteurize.

  4. #3
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    If the bees do not allow temperature in the hive above 95F degrees, how then after heating it to 115F honey is still considered raw?
    I don't think it is raw any longer.
    OK, maybe for the general public it is still raw.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  5. #4
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    Default

    At what temperatures do what changes occur? 94 definitely raw. 105 probably raw. 110? Yeasts gone? Enzymes gone? 120? Cooked? Nutrition gone? 140 over cooked? 160 pasteurized. 180 caramelized?
    All of my opinions and suggestions are based on my five decades of actual beekeeping,
    not so much on book learning, watching YouTube videos nor reading internet sites.

  6. #5
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    Default

    "Pasteurization or pasteurisation is a process in which packaged and non-packaged foods are treated with mild heat to eliminate pathogens and extend shelf-life. The process is intended to reduce spoilage organisms and eliminate vegetative bacteria but not bacterial spores." Wikipedia
    All of my opinions and suggestions are based on my five decades of actual beekeeping,
    not so much on book learning, watching YouTube videos nor reading internet sites.

  7. #6

    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Our honeys cristallize quickly if they are flow mixed.. I had made some mistakes with processing my honey and had a batch which fermented.
    Heated it to 120 F and it got liquid and is not fermented anymore. Taste is the same but I just looked and now it starts to crystallize ( kept in the basement 18C). Its a month later.
    Cook it and it tastes burned.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    At what temperatures do what changes occur? 94 definitely raw. 105 probably raw. 110? Yeasts gone? Enzymes gone? 120? Cooked? Nutrition gone? 140 over cooked? 160 pasteurized. 180 caramelized?
    These have always been my questions. What are the changes in composition and at what temps do the changes occur?

  9. #8
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Crystallization time is affected by the floral makeup of the particular batch of honey. Also the more complete the filtering the longer the start of crystallization since each particle of pollen or wax is a commencement point for the growth of crystals. Part of heating to high temps is to thin the honey so it is easier to fine filter. Removes yeasts as well.

    When reliquifying it is important to get 100% of the crystals dissolved or it may even recrystallize faster than the first time.
    Frank

  10. #9
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    Niagara Co., NY, USA
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by psm1212 View Post
    These have always been my questions. What are the changes in composition and at what temps do the changes occur?
    Good article here: https://www.beeculture.com/raw-honey-raw-deal/

  11. #10
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Schultz View Post
    Excellent article. Thank you for posting. I am clipping this excerpt in with credits to the article cited:

    To what temperature does honey have to be heated to destroy the health benefits for humans? John Skinner, at the University of Tennessee in an online publication, eXtension, states that excessive heat can have detrimental effects on the nutritional value of honey. (see www.bees.tennessee.edu) “Heating [honey] up to 37C (98.6F) causes loss of nearly 200 components, part of which are antibacterial. Heating up to 40C (104F) destroys invertase, an important enzyme. Heating up to 50C (122F) for more than 48 hours turns the honey into caramel (the most valuable honey sugars become analogous to sugar). Heating the honey to higher than 140F for more than two hours will cause rapid degradation. Heating honey higher than 160[F] for any time period will cause rapid degradation and carmelization. Generally any larger temperature fluctuation (10C is ideal for preservation of ripe honey) causes decay.”

  12. #11
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    At what temperatures do what changes occur? 94 definitely raw. 105 probably raw. 110? Yeasts gone? Enzymes gone? 120? Cooked? Nutrition gone? 140 over cooked? 160 pasteurized. 180 caramelized?
    The answer is really simple - max temperature that bees allow in their hive (so not to get cooked).
    That's your answer.
    No more.

    For myself (all my honey is for my family and my friends/landlords only) I only have truly raw honey.
    Now, this is true raw honey and I tell this to everyone.
    What I press out of the combs and roughly filter - that's what we all get.

    I monitor my backyard hives' temperature and today it was 91F in the hottest hive, for example.
    On the very hot days they max out at about 94-96F per my equipment.
    Anything above the maximum possible temperature of live hive - you start altering the natural properties of the honey.
    Calling it raw honey?
    I don't think it is raw honey anymore and "that" should not be called raw honey.
    Last edited by GregV; 09-10-2018 at 08:06 PM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  13. #12
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Schultz View Post
    A good example - “well, after all, it gets to 120F some days in Arizona.”
    Well, the bees never allow 120F in the hives.
    If they do, they just get cooked.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  14. #13

    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Yes, thanks for the article.

    Im selling the honey as "honey", not as "natural raw honey". Most of the imported liquid honey here in squeeze bottles is heated over 37C and mixed with molasses.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Missouri
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    Default Re: How hot to heat honey to delay granulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    I am filling a large order for plastic squeeze bottles. What temperature should I heat the honey to delay granulation?
    Heat to 130-135 F. then cool it down as quickly as possible. Use a water bath method...either water jacketed bottling tank or liquifying tank for buckets.
    Once desired temperature is reached, drain the hot water and immediately fill with cold water. This will bring the temperature down quickly...let it settle 12-24 hrs.
    and bottle at about 90 F. This will stabilize the honey from crystalization for several months, which is especially important in the newer clear plastic containers.
    I've found this method to preserve both the color and flavor.

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