Baiting hive out of tree?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, CA
    Posts
    125

    Default Baiting hive out of tree?

    I've been called out to swarms that are too high in a tree to get,
    and thus have put a bait hive out near the tree.

    The bees ignore my bait hive, and move on to another location.

    I've used with old comb, and with lemongrass oil,

    I've used full of drawn frames, or only half-full of frames.

    My theory is that I'm showing up too late in the day with the bait box,
    and the bees have already made their travel plans for the next morning.

    Has anyone here had had luck baiting a swarm down out of a tree?

    How long did it take from placement-of-box to habitation-of-box?

    What are the do-don'ts, and considerations around doing this successfully?


    Swarm catching's not new... have caught 30+... but success with this particular method eludes me.


    EDIT: What a brainfart thread title. Mods, can you please change to "Baiting Swarm out of Tree?"?
    Last edited by Metropropolis; 07-18-2018 at 11:32 PM.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    3,465

    Default Re: Baiting hive out of tree?

    I can only suspect that the same idea of "blind zone" applies everywhere with the bees (nectar sourcing or swarm attracting).
    Start with the "blind zone" research and make your conclusions.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO, USA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Baiting hive out of tree?

    I just read in a bee journal that bees really like UV blue light (430-480 nm). You could buy a bulb that emits that freq (I found them on Amazon) and set that next to your bait hive.

    I have no experience with this working, I just read about it.

    Good luck.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    wilmington,nc
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Get a fishing pole and cast a weighted line over the branch as close to the swarm as you can get. Option 1 is to shake the branch and hope the queen falls to a lower branch in the tree or comes to the ground unhurt. Have a box prepared for their new forever home. shake them from the lower branch into the box or let them walk in from the ground. Option 2 is the same set up but don't shake the limb. Remove the weight and attach a frame of drawn comb with some honey on it. Pull the frame up to the branch where the bees are located and wait for them to walk to the frame. You may have to shake the limb to get them to move. Once the queen gets on the frame the rest will follow. You will know the queen is on the frame when the frame quickly becomes the swarm. Put that frame in the box and wait for every bee to find the queen. Add frames as soon as you can to fill the box. I put a little lemon grass oil on a frame or two to hopefully keep the bees interested in staying in their new home. Does it work? Yup, I just put a swarm in the box about 20 minutes ago using this technique.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,922

    Default Re: Baiting hive out of tree?

    With QMP (either the "juice" from a jar of retired queens in alcohol or Psuedo Queen), lemongrass oil and old comb, I lure them off a branch more times than not.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lockhart, Texas
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: Baiting hive out of tree?

    When you cannot reach, the problem is that you just need longer arms.

    One fellow in our local club solved that by stretching his arms 18'. Well, sort of! He took one of those pool cleaner poles that collapses to 1/2 length, and added a swivel on the end attached to a small trash can (between bathroom and kitchen sized).

    It easily fits in the bed of his pickup. You get there, and you can either use the trash can to hit the branch as you push it up or have something else to hit the branch. The swarm fall into the trash can just inches below.

    Another option is to spread a bedsheet on the ground & knock the colony down. This minimizes the number of bees dropping into the grass and easier to gather them up. Not as good as the trash can on a pole, but it can work.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
    Posts
    2,243

    Default

    A roof rake will get you up there too. And a frame of open brood works well to lure them in. J

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Vernon, AZ. USA
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Your trap needs to be in place before they swarm, for best results. Also placing boxes 500-600 yds. from known hives works better.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    343

    Default Re: Baiting hive out of tree?

    If you want to shake them down, and assuming the branch is small enough, you can shoot a pilot line up with one of these:

    https://www.amazon.com/SherrillTree-...rist+slingshot

    It will go 100'+.

    You can put a line within 12" of your target. Getting the height right takes more finesse. Pull up your rope, and shake 'em down.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    4,646

    Default Re: Baiting hive out of tree?

    My traps are between 33 and 75 percent occupied every year, but very rarely do I attract a swarm that I see hanging in a tree with new traps. If you see the swarm you need to capture it and not wait for it to move in a box. I believe many swarms already have a location picked out, have seen swarms fly directly from the hive to the swarm box. Many others just may want to get some distance away from the original hive, also found the best spot to swarm trap around a bee tree is 50 plus yard away.

    I made a five gallon water jug with an old paint roller handle and have a 6' and 18' pole to go with it. Excellent for both low and high swarms in branches that you can shake.
    Similar to this
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDwPpDsIXZQ

    I have shot an arrow over a really high swarm with fishing line, tied it to trout line, then hoisted up a frame of brood. It took about 20 minutes per frame for part of the swarm to cover the brood. Lowered it then sent up an other one. After about four trips I had the swarm.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Vernon, AZ. USA
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Flower planter, I have noticed those same things swarm catching. You are one of the few, real bee trappers.

    I've noticed that few people are willing to really learn how, no matter what they hear.

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