Supplying restaurants sizes
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Delmar NY USA
    Posts
    23

    Default Supplying restaurants sizes

    I have a local eatery/bar that would like my honey, thatís great except I have no idea what size container is typically used, or if the price drops based on larger volume. Is there a standard size for reasturants? Is price a local thing or is it based off nation averages? The owner said however I want, but that doesnít sit right with me. It would be far to easy to just drop buckets. Any help would be appreciated.

    Dave

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Supplying restaurants sizes

    I would try to get some idea of their volume that they go through. And go from their. And how far are the away from you. Like I sell bears to a restaurant that is right around the corner from me. Cheaper than I normal do. Plus I have breakfast their most Sunday.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: Supplying restaurants sizes

    Will the eatery use the honey for preparing meals or offer it as a sweetner for hot drinks? Or as a spread for toast?
    A pail with a honey gate makes it easy to draw off honey for meal prep. It also makes it easy to refill smaller containers like squeeze bears for table use.

    Regards Peter
    Ottawa. ON

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Delmar NY USA
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Supplying restaurants sizes

    To clarify, yes it’s for meal prep. Don’t see a need for honey at the patrons table. I like the pail idea. Will that tend to crastilize quicker? This is a new ingredient for this restaurant, with several ideas not knowing where it will take them, they have three locations,

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    York County, VA, USA
    Posts
    503

    Default Re: Supplying restaurants sizes

    I would suggest that if your honey is specialty, raw/natural and they want to advertise as using it, then more power to them (and to you). If they expect the aromatic, flavorful raw honey taste I've come to expect from my (and others') backyard honey, they may be cooking the stuffing out of it and losing its special qualities. Just comments to be used as appropriate. Good luck with the endeavor.

    As an example, one of my co-workers (a foodie of sorts) asked about getting some of my honey. I gave him a bear bottle. Weeks later, the day after he ran out of his supermarket honey, he stopped me and asked, "Is all beekeeper honey as good as yours? It's so much better than the supermarket stuff I can hardly believe it." Or very similar words with the same sentiment. If you have the opportunity to preserve and benefit from that flavor difference, that's a good thing.

    Michael
    "I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong." (heard often from the late David Sebree) Still making them, myself

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,727

    Default Re: Supplying restaurants sizes

    I would suggest one gallon pails. One of my repair customers uses a lot of honey in their honey sirracha wing sauce. Watched them make it one day from 1# jars. Painful to observe as there was a lot of waste.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    279

    Default Re: Supplying restaurants sizes

    You didn't mention how much honey you produce or how you are selling it now. The question is this: do you really need to sell honey in large quantities because, yes, the price drops considerably as the amount increases. Just because they want your honey doesn't mean you have to sell it to them if that is not an advantage to you. Typically, the smaller the container, the greater the profit margin. In my area a 5 gallon bucket of honey will go for $3.00 per lb., or less if you buy several buckets. I sell my 1 lb. jars for $9.00. As a fairly small producer, I turn people away that want large quantities. But if you have the production to support it there is nothing wrong with selling in bulk to a restaurant. Just some things to think about.

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