plastic vs waxed vs foundationless
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    orland park
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    Default plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    Let me know what is your experience?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Murphy, TX
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    437

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    They all work if bees want to draw them. Foundationless requires extra attention and guides to avoid cross comb.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    3,291

    Default

    Plastic foundation

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee
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    1,462

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    Plastic is the stuff!
    Feeding early patties. https://youtu.be/bUDd3vk7bgY

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    Plastic with extra hand-applied wax, for me. But all beekeepers should try everything before settling on a fave.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Murphy, TX
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    437

    Default

    For the record, I have tried both foundationless and plastic. Plastic is your friend when flow is on. Foundationless for broodnest. I try to use as many foundationless as possible to save costs.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Indian Trail, North Carolina
    Posts
    25

    Default

    The first two years I ran strictly wax foundation, with little to no issues. For me, I found it too time consuming. 3 years ago, I switched to solid plastic frames/foundation (Rite Cell- Mann Lake). Even with the waxed plastic foundation I found myself buying and adding more wax as to my bees were slow drawing comb. I also found, that solid plastic frames tend to warp if frozen for a few days although it wasnt a major permanent problem. I did find an issue with the top bar ends breaking off, which puts an end to the solid plastic frame for me. But they do last a last a long time.
    I made the switch to wood frames and plastic foundation with a extra coat of wax.

    Dont get discouraged when the bees seem to draw comb slower,

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,290

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    The jury is still out with me. Last year it was all wax foundation. This year I started using both plastic and foundationless. The bees seem to prefer foundationless over the plastic but I don't have enough frames drawn of either to know for sure. I would like to use plastic for the even comb you get. The wax foundation tends to be wavy.
    Last edited by JWPalmer; 06-14-2018 at 07:06 PM. Reason: Stupid spelling
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    613

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    I started with wood frame/plastic foundation (Rite Cell- Mann Lake) and still love it. I also use foundationless which bees seem to prefer over the Rite Cell. But then bees draw too many drone size combs (for my liking), so these days I only use them in nucs (bees tend to draw worker size combs there).

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Red Bud, IL, USA
    Posts
    1,809

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    Started foundationless and never saw a reason to switch; I bought out some new equipment and taking a sip of the wood frame/plastic foundation Kool-Aid this year. You might as well ask us "boxers, briefs or depends" for all the opinions you'll receive; none of which are wrong.
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    633

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    I run a mix of wood frames with plastic foundation and wood frames without foundation with starter sticks. My hive from last year (2017 was my first year) tends to draw out the foundation less frames as mostly drone comb, but I think they are reaching their drone quota and starting to draw worker cells on the foundation less frames. I have about 25% foundationless between drawn combs in my supers in the hope that I can get some cut comb. If I did not put the foundationless between drawn frames in the super the bees seemed to draw the cells really thick on some frames. I have added more wax to some of the plastic foundation and the bees seem to draw out the cells with added wax quicker.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Croatia
    Posts
    100

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    The gap between combs in two boxes with plastic frames is 15-20 mm and that gap with wooden frames is 40-50 mm. With narrower gap it is now more rational to use all medium/shallow frames/boxes.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Williamsport, PA
    Posts
    499

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    Quote Originally Posted by pjigar View Post
    For the record, I have tried both foundationless and plastic. Plastic is your friend when flow is on. Foundationless for broodnest. I try to use as many foundationless as possible to save costs.
    I use plastic as well and am very "frugal", lol. I cut the sheets of foundation in half or thirds as was shown on many other threads on BS. They draw it very nicely and a batch of foundation goes 2x or 3x longer.

    If I want it drawn quick I use a whole sheet. I make my own frames too because I'm "frugal".

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,922

    Default Re: plastic vs waxed vs foundationless

    I do a lot of foundationless and a lot of plastic small cell (Mann Lake PF120s) and some fully drawn (PermaComb and Honey Super Cell). Different things are useful under different circumstances...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

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