Brood
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Thread: Brood

  1. #1
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    Can someone tell why i have open cells and why they open caped cells
    https://ibb.co/isD3Vo
    Last edited by maxbees; 05-20-2018 at 12:25 AM.

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxbees View Post
    Can someone tell why i have open cells and why they open caped cells
    https://ibb.co/isD3Vo
    They may or may not have opened the cells. If the cell did not meet the queens fancy she will pass on it. Hygienic bees will remove larvae they sense is damaged.

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by maxbees View Post
    Can someone tell why i have open cells and why they open caped cells
    https://ibb.co/isD3Vo
    They may or may not have opened the cells. If the cell did not meet the queens fancy she will pass on it. Hygienic bees will remove larvae they sense is damaged.
    So queen is problem ?? I dont think these bees are hygienic

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Brood

    Brood pattern doesn't look bad. Like nasalsponge suggested, the queen wont lay in a cell she doesn't like. I have some frames where there is no brood in cells with the wire behind them. Sorry, no pics. of the vertical lines of empty cells.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Brood pattern doesn't look bad. Like nasalsponge suggested, the queen wont lay in a cell she doesn't like. I have some frames where there is no brood in cells with the wire behind them. Sorry, no pics. of the vertical lines of empty cells.
    Yes right but why they open few cells and dont drags out pupae?

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Brood

    Perhaps the bees are expressing Varroa Sensitive Hygiene, but not strong enough to remove the pupae. I would check varroa load.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Perhaps the bees are expressing Varroa Sensitive Hygiene, but not strong enough to remove the pupae. I would check varroa load.
    Thanks Mike. I just pick 5 pupae to check if i can find under varroa but i didnt find any ... i will track them from now to see what will happen... Mike what you think what means when bee caps are sunken not raised ?

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Brood

    Quote Originally Posted by maxbees View Post
    Thanks Mike. I just pick 5 pupae to check if i can find under varroa but i didnt find any ... i will track them from now to see what will happen... Mike what you think what means when bee caps are sunken not raised ?
    Do an alcohol wash. I'm still thinking varroa is a possibility.

    Not sure if the slightly sunken cappings mean anything. You could open some and look at the pupae. You could mark some and see if the bee emerged.

  10. #9

    Default Re: Brood

    My quess is the same as Michaels, high mite load.

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Brood

    High mite load, but you can have some valuable going on. Read the following;
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-26001-7

    Here is a part of it;

    "An ethogram that demonstrates the behavioural sequence involved in the social immunity of adult worker honey bees targeting mite-infested sealed brood cells. (a) Top view of worker brood cells, (b). Underside of an intact, worker cell capping that is completely covered by the glossy larval silk cocoon. The ethogram is comprisesd of four stages: 1. Investigating cells: workers scrutinize the wax capping of cells with their tongue and antennae (c). 2. Uncapping of cells: workers use their mandibles to remove the wax capping of cells (d). These first two stages are always performed in the same sequence. A major transition occurs after stage 2, where workers can decide between the following two stages. 3. Recapping of cells: workers use wax gland secretions and their mandibles to recap the cells (e), resulting in the underside of a recapped cell displaying a notable dark hole with a visually matte wax (f). 4. Removal of brood: workers pull out and discard the brood from mite-infested cells (g). The entire behavioural sequence is flexible due to decision making by multiple workers involved. The sequence can stop after stage 1. (i.e. cells are investigated, but not uncapped), or after stage 2. (i.e. uncapped cells can be recapped or not) and both uncapping and recapping can be only partly performed (i.e. only a part of the capping is uncapped and/or recapped). Photos in c, d & e © Anders Lindström."

  12. #11
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    One more thing why some strong hives building comb between frames and on frames i think queens are open mated and maybe because of different dron race or ? https://ibb.co/bRdqd8

  13. #12

    Default Re: Brood

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunajavelho View Post
    High mite load, but you can have some valuable going on.
    Possible, but I did not want to wake false hopes.

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