Which frame for which foundation
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Lynchburg, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    28

    Default Which frame for which foundation

    I am wanting to produce honey comb with extracted honey around it. Like honey comb in a jar with the comb in the middle. I know I need thin surplus foundation but I am confused as to which frame I need. And if I order it this year for next year will it melt or become brittle in the unheated/air conditioned shed

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,940

    Default

    Personally, I use regular crosswired frames with standard foundation. Cut them from the frame in the desired size and bam! If you use thin without crosswires in a med super there is a real chance of collapse......this is where shallow supers come in. The purpose of their existence is comb honey. 🙂

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,743

    Default Re: Which frame for which foundation

    Search on this forum for Michael Palmers posts on cut comb honey and also his Youtube videos. Excellent info!
    Frank

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,019

    Default Re: Which frame for which foundation

    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    Personally, I use regular crosswired frames with standard foundation. Cut them from the frame in the desired size and bam! If you use thin without crosswires in a med super there is a real chance of collapse......this is where shallow supers come in. The purpose of their existence is comb honey. 🙂
    Wireless foundation? Isn't standard foundation a fair amount thicker than comb foundation thus thick in the mouth? Just asking because I have a few request for some comb in honey that until this point I have not supplied. If you use standard foundation I could just cut a few chucks from around the crimped wires...
    sc-bee

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Lamar Co. Alabama, USA
    Posts
    4,119

    Default Re: Which frame for which foundation

    Wedge top frames with either slotted or divided (twin bars with space all the way through) bottoms. You can wire the frames then cut the wire and pull it out of the comb before removing the chunks of comb.
    "Sometimes the best action, with bees, is no action at all."

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,019

    Default Re: Which frame for which foundation

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryG74 View Post
    Wedge top frames with either slotted or divided (twin bars with space all the way through) bottoms. You can wire the frames then cut the wire and pull it out of the comb before removing the chunks of comb.
    Are you referring to thin surplus or comb foundation? Both are different from standard foundation ie deep-medium-shallow standard foundation. And of course all three come with or without crimped wires. Since you said "`You can wire the frame cut and pull the wires I know you are talking plain wireless foundation but still no mention of thickness?
    sc-bee

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Lamar Co. Alabama, USA
    Posts
    4,119

    Default Re: Which frame for which foundation

    According to the Dadant catalog, there is foundation for cut comb that is a little thicker than the thin surplus. They recommend the thicker foundation for cut comb (easier to handle is one reason) but recommend the thin surplus for comb honey, for round or square section honey. I've used thin surplus for cut comb and it worked fine for me, others may use the thicker foundation. The wires I'm talking about cutting are horizontal wires the beekeeper would wire the frame with to hold the thin foundation vertical so it wouldn't sag. Cut the horizontal wires before cutting the comb from the frame.

    The cut comb foundation would have more chewiness since the rib in the comb would be thicker than if thin surplus was used.
    "Sometimes the best action, with bees, is no action at all."

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