Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid! - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    I totally agree. I randomly happened to see my hive swarming on my birthday last week. The coalesced on my neighbor's tree, and then a couple of hours later, the swarm was gone from the tree. If I had been at work instead of taking the day off, I would have never known.

    Quote Originally Posted by Specialkayme View Post
    Many people's hives swarm on them and they don't even know it.
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

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  3. #22
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Quote Originally Posted by clarekate View Post
    Last year I tried to mark a queen and she was super feisty and fought and I felt like I was squishing her, so I never tried again.
    Practice on drones. Just use next year's color.

  4. #23
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    It's done! Everything was dissembled and reassembled according to the modified II instructions. The only mistake (and it was a pretty big one!) was that I didn't spot the queen on a frame after what I thought was careful searching, and I ended up shaking it over the hive to make sure there were no beginnings of queen cells (I don't generally shake frames, even to inspect them better, unless I'm getting a sample for a sugar roll, so in hindsight it seems reckless even though it seemed okay at the time). I was still doing my thing and I noticed like a tight ball of bees towards the leg of the hive stand. The queen, the one I haven't visualized in months, was ON THE GROUND and surrounded by workers! And then I gently scooped her with a twig and she clumsily FLEW and it was several minutes before I saw her again in a pile of workers. I did get her safely back in but I'm somewhat worried she may have been injured in it all, although she looked fine at a glance. I guess that worse case scenario both halves will produce a new queen if she has been harmed. I feel like the clumsiest person alive for that one.

    BUT, the rest went okay although it was a little daunting to break down the whole hive and try to sort of what was what and find the best brood hives for the lower box. I did find two with lots of eggs, so I feel good about my choices. Because of my lack of empty drawn comb, I ended up with the two brood frames, two frames of mostly honey, a frame of a lot of pollen and honey, and 5 frames of foundation. The two stacked mediums worked beautifully in a pinch and my deep boxes are on order. I will be checking the weather next week for my time period of 7-11 days from now and am going to try to trade a shift or request a half day off to try to do the next big manipulation.

    I’m still confused as to what exactly I’m supposed to be doing at day 4-5?

  5. #24
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Way to go! It's amazing what we'll put ourselves through for a box of bugs. I am curious if the queen was thinner than you expected her to be? I'd like to know if the amount they thin down in preparation to swarm is immediately noticeable and how long before a swarm it occurs.

  6. #25
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Clarekate
    That was a great story. I would have did one thing differrent and will explain my thinking but also think you will be fine anyway. For queen making, the stuff you put in the bottom will help.

    Had I been doing it, I think I would have put nothing but the two brood frames down (and then I would have worried about starvation) The bottom is all foragers and they can gather well now that they are not really feeding brood. The top with the queen needs food cause for a week or two they have no foragers. and are making brood (maybe making brood if the queen is still laying).

    In eight days, I would want those bees to draw as much comb as possible. Do not take this as advice cause I am new and just throwning an ideal that might be so far out there as to be bad. I throw it out there in the hopes a smart person will come along and tell me yes or no, cause I will be doing what you are doing pretty soon and am learning through you also.

    Thanks for posting your experiance.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  7. #26
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Quote Originally Posted by bob128 View Post
    Way to go! It's amazing what we'll put ourselves through for a box of bugs. I am curious if the queen was thinner than you expected her to be? I'd like to know if the amount they thin down in preparation to swarm is immediately noticeable and how long before a swarm it occurs.
    This is hard to answer because this queen was hard to find all last year (I don't think I found her until fall!) and I actually hadn't seen her directly yet this year, so I didn't have a frame of reference. She was always smaller than the queens in my other two hives and I would say slimmer. I was in panic mode about my slip up, so I didn't get the best look and hadn't expected her to fly at the time, although of course it makes perfect sense if she was prepped to fly in a swarm. I like to take pictures since I work solo and sometimes like reminders of things I saw to compare and learn as I go. This is a horrible picture because it was down by the hive stand leg, but here is the queen as I found her:

    bees - 3.jpg

  8. #27
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    Clarekate
    Had I been doing it, I think I would have put nothing but the two brood frames down (and then I would have worried about starvation) The bottom is all foragers and they can gather well now that they are not really feeding brood. The top with the queen needs food cause for a week or two they have no foragers. and are making brood (maybe making brood if the queen is still laying).

    In eight days, I would want those bees to draw as much comb as possible. Do not take this as advice cause I am new and just throwning an ideal that might be so far out there as to be bad. I throw it out there in the hopes a smart person will come along and tell me yes or no, cause I will be doing what you are doing pretty soon and am learning through you also.

    Thanks for posting your experiance.
    Cheers
    gww
    I wish I had some drawn deep frames because it definitely seems fine to put 8 frames of empty comb in with the foragers and the 2 brood frames, but it just seemed like 8 undrawn frames would be too much. Good point and I would also be interested in the thoughts of others on this who have done splits and swarm control this way. I did leave a super above this hive. In a week and a half most of it’s foundation is drawn out and there is the first traces of honey in the center frame. If I had to add another super, this configuration is towering and I actually would need a ladder to work this hive!

    The two deeps I had in the original hive were FULL, like just honey-locked, so the top two boxes with the queen are still great on stores, despite being about to lose all the foragers.

    Like I said when bob128 asked about how the queen looked, I take a LOT of pictures as I go. I’ll post a few here. I was trying to be organized about going through the boxes and deciding which to include in the bottom, so I was ALL spread out in every available box as I broke the hive down (hence a couple nuc boxes holding sorting frames). I was a mess, haha! And as before, I was out of full deep boxes (ordered some), so my bottommost box is actually 2 stacked mediums with deep frames inside.

    bees - 2.jpg beesource - 1.jpg beesource - 2.jpg beesource - 3.jpg

  9. #28
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Clarekate
    From your pictures it looks like you have a super down with the old bees. If it is not full, the bees have something to work with.

    I did not do a double screen board split but did do something simular last year. I just moved the whole hive about ten feet sideways and set a box in the old place with one frame of brood and one of honey. The brood frame had a queen cell on it. I am foundationless and also run 10 frame mediums and so my box might add a little more then a five frame nuc. The other eight frames I gave the bees was fondationless empty frames. I did not time it but the old foragers drew comb faster then my other splits and did so with out feed. I know it was mostly drawn out before the queen in the cell became a laying queen. Of course Then the old bees die and it takes a little time for the new layed bees to ramp up but that first bit has lots of foragers bringing stuff into the hive.

    I would say it is not needed to have more room then you have for your bees to have work to do. I was just thinking it would be a shame if they could do more and you missed it. A really small thing in the big picture cause 8 days is not that long and it will go good no matter what.

    You have exellent looking hives, a much differrent picture then I could take if it was of my hives.

    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  10. #29
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Brava ClareKate!

    It sounds like you did very well, and especially since you saw (and didn't step on!) the roaming queen on the ground, recognized the situation for what it was and got her safely stowed in the upper box.

    So, on Day 4 or 5 you're going to make it easier to find her when you need to do the switch before Day 11. Here's how: You currently have an open door leading into the upper section on one side or on the back, right? (If you don't have an open door leading to the upper section, it is an emergency to get one opened, before tomorrow.) A day or so before the 4th or 5th day (whenever it's convenient for you) , take a flatheaded screwdriver out and make sure you can easily open the door just below the current open door AND on the other side (or the back), make sure you can open a door into the upper section. Just make sure the doors work, OK. Then on 4th or 5th (your choice) preferably during the day time when foragers are flying from the upper section, SHUT the original upper section door and OPEN the one just below it. Then go and OPEN the new upper-section door around the corner or on the other side of the hive. What this does is funnel a portion of the adult bees that have oriented on the first upper-section door area down into the lower section, where they will be welcomed (because both colonies still share a common "scent".) Even some bees that are in the hive at the time of the door switch may still be oriented on the original and when they can't get in at the familiar place will happily toddle in to join the bees in the lower section. This will help reduce the number of bees in the upper section, and thus make finding the queen easier when you need to do that. (You can make another door switch before the queen-swap day, if there are a lot of bees in the upper section. But after the 11th day, do not change the door again.)

    You must be able to find her, no later than the 11th day, so she can be whisked back down to the lower section (along with another frame with brood on it) and exchanged for the two frames that the lower section has got started with queen cells. If you have a ton of queen cells on each of the two frames, this is also an opportunity to make another nuc with one of the frames with queen cells, some brood and frames of stores in one of your nuc boxes. This will give you two chances to get at least one queen out and mated, doubling your chance of success if an additional colony is your secondary goal of using the Snelgrove board, after the primary goal of swarm stopping. If an additional colony is not your goal then cull the total number of queen cells down to no more than three in all (counting both frames) nice looking ones. (Some people never leave more than two cells.) Making up a nuc might be a advisable if you find cells in both sections because the queen got injured today: you'd be growing three queens for two known needs, with the possibility of a nuc if all three get out, mated and safely back.

    Add super space to the bottom section if your flow seems strong to save having to disturb things after the virgin upstairs may have hatched.


    When I must find a queen I use both a dummy box to hold any frame I have already looked at (to keep her from just running endlessly from one frame to another), and a nuc box to stow her and the frame once I've found her while I get organized to select which other frame to be swapped down, and get the bottom section open and the queen cell frames moved to the upper box. If your new deeps are on hand by then, you may want to get the bottom box switched over to a deep rather than the double mediums it now has. Once she's back and laying in the bottom section they may draw brood comb under the frames in the empty space of the doubled-up mediums. That will be an added, unnecessary complication later on. Anyway, once her box is ready, move her and the other frame, add supers, (queen ex under super if you use one) and the double screen board on top, and then the upper section which has been waiting with the queen cell-frames already installed (and the box covered to keep them warm) while you fixed up the bottom section.

    This will be a complicated manipulation (especially if you are simultaneously making up a nuc). I find it useful to stick tape on the boxes before hand with notes about which frames I want where "Queen plus one frame of brood" stuck on bottom box. " Frame(s) with queen cells, culled down to three" on the top box, etc. Shaw's paper, as good as it is, is still confusing, so I map it out ahead of time.

    But after you've got the queen moved down, your part is done. All you have to do is await events. Queens will hatch on the 16th day from an egg (about 11.5 days from the date of split - so you see why the timing is VERY tight). Then she will spend a few days hardening her wings, and may be orienting on her entrance. Then off she will fly for a day on the town, returning after she's been partying with a lot of drones. And then she will fly into her hive, never to leave again. (Unless her beekeeper shakes her on to the ground .... just sayin') It will take her a day or two to get really organized for laying, so I'd check on her progress about 11 days (first period before swap) + 4 days wing hardening and maybe waiting for good weather + 1 mating day + say, three days for OJT at egg laying, or about two and half weeks from today at the earliest. Don't despair for her unless another full week goes by without any sign of eggs. If you can't reliably see eggs, then add four or five days to the two and a half weeks, so the larvae will be fat and easily visible.

    After you have confirmed queen rightness, the next step is to get the hive off and on to its own base. I usually set something up so the hive is nearly at the same level as it was on the stack, then shift it off on to its own bottom board. If your last door position is on the end, not one of the sides, you can just face the hive entrance on its new bottom board that way for a few days before turning it around to face the way you want. If the entrance was on a side, then I set the new bottom board up at right angles to the original stack so it opens on its front in the same direction as the double screen board's door did, on its side. Does that makes sense?

    Looking forward to your progress notes!

    Nancy

  11. #30
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Get L. E. Snelgove's book, "Swarming: Its Control and Prevention." I have been keeping bees for 20 years and have found this to be the ONLY method that works consistently. Clipping queen cells, reversing bodies, etc. only delay the swarm. The impulse remains.

  12. #31
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Basically this week was a disaster, and to cut to the chase I was too late in getting back in to my hives. I’ve been struggling with a sinus infection and asthma flare-up but was able to arrange my work schedule to make sure I could make it in to do the swap between days 7-10. All of that got thrown for a loop and I ended up admitted in the hospital from Wednesday to Friday for respiratory issues. Needless to say, I was in no fit state to go out in the humidity and work the hives, but I gave it my best go today which was day 11 (my husband is not into working with the bees but graciously helped me carry my extra supers, dummy boxes, and other equipment down to my hives for me!).

    I was too late. In the bottom, where I should have been removing to frames of queen cells, some had already hatched. I am pretty sure I even spotted a fresh queen scurrying around a frame but lost sight of her. In the bottom, where I should have been finding the old queen, there was a whole slew of queen cells there too and some appeared to have already emerged. I’m guessing my clumsiness which resulted in the queen on the ground did injure here and they were superseding. To be honest, I was feeling pretty poorly and struggling a bit, so I did not go through each frame to determine if the old queen was actually still there (although I realize this was a big mistake, I was kind of just doing what I could).

    In “The Many Uses of the Snelgrove Board” article, it sounds like you just kind of let things be if you miss the 11 day window, so that’s what I ended up doing. I did not swap any frames and just added an extra super to the bottom section under the screened board. I’m not 100% sure if this was correct, but I’m not going to be able to physically make it out there for several more days.

    Nancy or can anyone give some guidance? A learning experience for sure and a lot that ended up quite outside my control, but I’m hoping to make the best of it. How soon should I worry about needing to add more supers since it’s the thick of the season? Should I add both the the bottom and top sections? (This is going to be a REALLY tall tower by then!) How soon from today (day 11 from the initial manipulation and around the day 0 for queens emerging) should I wait to inspect both sections? Still two and a half weeks as previously suggested? How soon from that check, assuming the queens are in there and laying, could I separate the two hives from my giant stack?

    Trying to be positive as everything this week has been a bit of a struggle and this was a huge stress of the week, just wondering how I could get out there in time only to end up being a bit of a mess. As always, any feedback and guidance is SO very appreciated - thanks!

    sunday - 1.jpg sunday - 2.jpg

  13. #32
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Clairk....
    Nancy is more experianced and can give better advice then me. I will tell you what I would do anyway.

    I would add supers based on what you are seeing. My opinion is that you added on bottom but they will be filling it fast due to lots of foragers and on top, you will be getting more foragers due to having to leave things alone till a queen is bred. I think you will be good up there till you get a laying queen and that you have the few days you need to recooperate at any rate.

    The most important thing over the next few weeks is that the door on the top only goes to the top and the one on the bottom is not open where bees can go down. You do not want the queen to get mated and end up in the bottom with those queens that are also getting mated. If you lost a swarm, it is probly too late already if you saw hatched cells cause they would have left when they hatched.

    So keeping the hive doors seperate and leaving the hive alone for a few weeks and then checking for eggs and larva should be the plan. The only addition to this is if you added enough space on the bottom for how fast the bees are gathering food and I could not stop myself from pulling the top on the top hive to see if it was getting too full of stores and needed room. I am almost positive it won't and I also know you should not mess with the hives during mating so there is no disruption that could mess that up. I do it anyway myself cause I am curious, even if I shouldn't. It all works out in the end and you have options cause unless both queens don't return (I had all return last year out of 6) you can always recombine or move the top part to its own stand and give it some open brood to make even more queens. It has young bees and would do it easy.

    So the only real posible desaster that may have happened is that you may already have lost some bees to the trees that left with one of the cells that hatched. I guess if you see some queen cells still unhatched and not destroyed that they could let go of another after swarm but I would have a hard time destroying then not knowing for sure that one was hatched in the hive and did not leave with some bees.

    So my vote is make sure the doors are correct and don't touch the hives or doors for a few weeks and then check for laying queen.

    Sorry to hear you were ill. Nancy will correct me if I am telling you wrong. My disclaimer is that I am only starting my third summer and so that is what my advice is worth.
    Good luck
    gww
    zone 5b

  14. #33
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Gosh, ClareKate, what a week you've had!

    The successful queen in the lower section will go out sometime in the next week and then come back and start laying. So on the weekend of June 2-3, you could take a look for eggs to confirm that, or sometime the following week if you can't easily see eggs. Meanwhile you don't have risk of laying worker, nor much of a swarm risk, either.

    The new queen in the upper section is a little harder to predict as we don't have a good date nor do we know whether those are emergency cells or supercedure cells. Though if you saw an opened QC in that hive, too, then it's on the same timing as the bottom section. Same low swarm risk and no laying worker, either, for a bit.

    You're just going to have to trust that your bees have got this figured out. I checked your forecast on Accuweather and you have excellent queen mating weather coming up later this week through the middle of next week. Memorial Day a bit iffy, but otherwise no problems on that score.

    As gww cautioned, you want to make no door changes from here on out. If your flow is really going gangbusters then super up both sections, again. In order to not interfere with the queen going out to mate do the supering in the morning as the earliest safe temps, but definitely before about 9:30 am. Err on the side of exposing the bees to cold (nearly no brood by now, anyway) vs risking opening the hive when the queen could be returning from mating and winding up in the wrong box.

    Since you supered the bottom today, they won't likely need attention again until the weekend, which is smack in the middle of the possible mating period, so you may need an early morning manipulation there. It isn't hard to do. Just set up a temp base, and quickly remove each box in turn until you get to the point where the new super goes, set it down and immediately re-stack, box by box, It shouldn't take more than five minutes. Makes no attempt to pull frames, etc. Just let 'em carry on with their plans.

    The upper box is even easier, just lift the lid and add the super.

    This will either work out pretty much as you expect, and you'll have two colonies, or you'll have one, nice strong one. But that's right where you started, and the colony didn't swarm, which was the goal that started all this.

    And if after all this, you only have one and still want to start a nuc to overwinter, in a few weeks you can use the Snelgrove board again and start over. Only this time you won't be under the pressure of an imminent swarm.

    The bees will fix everything up just right. They are marvelous creatures.

    Hope your health improves and you are feeling much better, soon.

    All is well.

    Nancy

  15. #34
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Nancy and gww - you are wonderful! Thank you!

    I was able to get out to the beeyard on Memorial Day for a bit. Just added a super to the very top of my Snelgrove hive and otherwise let it be. Checked my other two and (thank the heavens) they are still doing great, no signs of having swarmed or prepping to swarm, despite my inability to monitor them much in the last weeks. Hallelujah!

    Here’s my follow-up question to all my follow-up questions? If and when I do see signs that both halves of my vertical split are queen right, when can I move the top half off to a new stand and bottom board? As soon as the queen is laying or do they need longer as they adjust? The stack, with it’s brood boxes and now with the accompanying supers on both halves, is unmanageably tall!

    Also, one of my other hives is just really lagging being the others in a major way. It overwintered, did not have a mite issue when checked within the month, and the queen has great brood pattern though considerably less brood compared to her neighbors. I already have 3 supers on my hive that hasn’t wanted to swarm and supers on my vertical split Snelgrove hive, but this lagging hive hasn’t even added stores to a near empty top deep after reversing hive bodies in the spring. If I do end up with two queenright halves in my Snelgrove-board hive, I would like to use one of these queens to requeen this lagging hive. Would the best way be to dispose of the underperforming queen and combine them with the deep and super of the new queen? If so, do I need to give the new queen more time to adjust after she starts laying? What would be the timeframe to do this? Could I, theoretically and if the stars align for the new queens and they start laying soon, just take the top half off my Snelgrove-hive directly to a newspaper combination rather than skipping the step of setting it up as a separate hive in between? If so, that would be brilliant as it would solve my problem of space crunch in my existing beeyard.

    Thanks again and I appreciate any guidance with these follow-up questions and thoughts

  16. #35
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Clarekate

    I really like updates of what actually happened in threads that I participate in. I learn with you.

    This is my opinion and I think I am not leading you down a bad path but am relying on the forum to call me an idiot if I give bad info.

    My belief is that as soon as you know you have eggs and larva pointing to a laying queen, you can move the hive. When you move it, it is going to lose some bees due to the foragers left from you last door change staying with the bottom part of the hive.

    I believe you will have no issues just pinching your bad queen and new paper combining.

    I have not pinched the queen and it has worked out.

    You could cage you queen just in case something went wrong which I don't think it will.

    I will tell you about what happened to me this year.

    I do not know where you are in your season compared to where I am but here goes. I had a hive that was just not building up starting from a single medium hive body that had over wintered. The queen was tiny and was laying a really spotty brood pattern. My plan was to eventually replace the queen. I had another hive that was pretty big but I did not really want to split and last year I had luck just removing two brood combs from my only hive that did not swarm. So I thought I would try it again and try to retard the big hive by taking a few brood frames from it. I dropped them into what I call my dink (the hive that was not building up). That little dink has now caught up with my other hives and may surpass them eventually cause it is now growing faster.

    So it might depend on if you want more hives or are happy with the number you have now. A frame or two of brood might not hurt where you took it from and may relieve some stress from the hive having trouble building up.

    You can also put your double screen hive on top of the other hive for a week to mingle the sent before newspaper combining and be even safer though it would be more work. I am not sure of this part of this advice, but think that if I put the hive on the double screen on top of your slow builder, I would leave the queen till I did the actual combine so that the bottom hive did not start queen cells. It would be safer but more work and I will say if it was me, I would do it the easy way knowing the bees still have time to make another queen if something went wrong. So "I" would just newspaper combine once I knew I had a laying queen. I am just that lazy and think the odds would still be on my side.

    I sure hope this is not confusing.
    Good luck
    gww

    Ps Don't go into panic mode and rush the queens getting mated. You know when they hatched, they have up to 21 days to get bred before real panic and if you are like me just eggs are hard to see and I need bigger larva or capped brood for my eyes which is another week. No sense in going in too early and then worrying.
    Last edited by gww; 06-01-2018 at 10:02 PM.
    zone 5b

  17. #36
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    Default Re: Hive prepping to swarm - please tell me if my plan sounds solid!

    Thought I’d post an update. My work schedule plus the on and off rain/thunderstroms in Ohio have me all thrown off. I was able to check on my vertical split and found eggs and larvae in BOTH halves! I was trying to fit my bee work (which took quite a while just moving around all the boxes!) in between work and a thunderstorm yesterday, so I actually only looked in each until I had confirmed brood. Hoping to lay eyes on the new queens and do a more thorough check soon.

    I did end up using one of the new queens to re-queen that other struggling hive. I considered a few ways to do it (thanks gww for your thoughts on this!). Since the weather and my availability is iffy, I decided to go for the method that got it done with no time-specific follow-up. I disposed of the under-performing queen, put down the newspaper with a few slits, and added the half of my Snelgrove split that only had one deep plus its accompanying super. I actually ended up using one of my Snelgrove boards on top to provide the upper entrance.

    All of this took quite a bit of dismantling and shuffling hive boxes as I used the bottom portion of my vertical split to requeen the other hive since it was the one in one deep. I put the top portion of the split on the hive stand in the original location. Because this hive had had its entrance off to the side on my Snelgrove board, I ended up putting a Snelgrove board on top of this hive too with a side entrance in the original location. I differ this provides an entrance on the same side and at roughly around the same height until the bees adjust to having a front entrance on the regular bottom board.

    The good news is that my vertical split hive (the bottom half, as makes sense with where most foragers would have been) managed to fill a full medium super of honey! On the hive that wasn’t affected by any of this, I have three capped supers of honey from this spring only! So, all is well that ends well (assuming my new queens stay adjusted and performing!). I am back to three regular hives, three queens, and hives at a manageable height. I’m planning on doing a spring honey harvest since I’m eager to FINALLY have honey (it’s my third year but will be my first real harvest other than crushing/straining a few frames for myself at the end of year 1). AND I learned a ton, had some great guidance on the forum here, and really thought through things as well. Thanks again to everyone here!

    —————

    Just a few pics on how I ended up arranging (ignore the encroaching plants, haven’t gotten around to weeding and trimming back!). The hive on the left is the fabulous hive that stayed just as is. In the middle hive, I had ended up using two mediums in place of a deep at the very bottom while I waited for my new deeps to be shipped, so the white deep contains the frames from those blue boxes. The top half of the vertical split remains in the same location, the bottom half is on the top of the rightmost hive to requeen it.

    beforeafter.jpg

    The middle hive and it's top-side entrance to help the bees find their way back:
    bees - 6.jpg

    The right hive, using my other Snelgrove board to make a top entrance until they make their way through the newspaper:
    bees - 7.jpg

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