Rookie Mistake
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Thread: Rookie Mistake

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Morehead, KY
    Posts
    30

    Default Rookie Mistake

    So, here's the situation. It is my 2nd year beekeeping. I was wanting to experiment with single deep brood chambers. So I went to the yard over the weekend and tried to use one of my double hives that didn't have anything in the bottom box. However, when I got there there was 2 frames of brood in the bottom box. So, instead of putting them into a nuc and creating a new colony I made a rookie mistake (Hindsight is 20/20). I reversed the boxes so the full box was on bottom and the few frames of brood was on top with a queen excluder between the two to keep the queen in the bottom box. My thinking was when the brood hatches out I can just remove the top box. Now, I realize that it probably wasn't the best option. So should I remove the exluder and wait for them to build up to 2 full deeps and do a split? Or should I do a split now and put them into a nuc? Thanks for the replies, sorry for the novel that I wrote.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: Rookie Mistake

    Well, the queen excluder may prompt them to make queen cells up in the upper box. (At least that's the gist of the long supercedure vs emergency cell thread.) And if that has happened by the time you get back, then your split is already started for you.

    But if you removed the queen excluder right away, you would have just functionally, if a trifle awkwardly, done a reverse. The bees will likely start some more frames of brood in the upper box, which will give you more brood resources for your split.

    I'm not sure when you'd be supering? (I'm so far north I haven't even done all my first inspections, yet, so what do I know about KY?)

    If you just want a single split, and not too much interference with your honey collection, then using a Snelgrove board might be just the ticket. Easy to use, and will result in two, single deep colonies when you're done and you can super both under the board and over it if you wind up with a lot of bees up there. It will temporarily be a TALL stack, but break down easily into two parts, each with one brood box once you get the new queen out and mated.

    Hope this is useful.

    Nancy

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Morehead, KY
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Rookie Mistake

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    Well, the queen excluder may prompt them to make queen cells up in the upper box. (At least that's the gist of the long supercedure vs emergency cell thread.) And if that has happened by the time you get back, then your split is already started for you.

    But if you removed the queen excluder right away, you would have just functionally, if a trifle awkwardly, done a reverse. The bees will likely start some more frames of brood in the upper box, which will give you more brood resources for your split.

    I'm not sure when you'd be supering? (I'm so far north I haven't even done all my first inspections, yet, so what do I know about KY?)

    If you just want a single split, and not too much interference with your honey collection, then using a Snelgrove board might be just the ticket. Easy to use, and will result in two, single deep colonies when you're done and you can super both under the board and over it if you wind up with a lot of bees up there. It will temporarily be a TALL stack, but break down easily into two parts, each with one brood box once you get the new queen out and mated.

    Hope this is useful.

    Nancy
    Thanks for the input! That is a good point about the queen cell, heck maybe all of this will work out by chance!

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: Rookie Mistake

    Often it does.

    Nancy

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Fertile, MN
    Posts
    156

    Default Re: Rookie Mistake

    really depends on what your goal is.

    I dont think any mistakes have been made.

    Just pull off the top box in the morning and add a mated queen, or a queen cell.

    If you current hive is last year's queen you should consider ordering an additional queen to replace her.
    Young queens - Tanner Christianson

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