Eating pollen
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Thread: Eating pollen

  1. #1
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    Default Eating pollen

    Anyone else scoop out pollen from frames and eat it ?

    I really like the taste....

    I try not to mess cells up , but sometimes it happens.

    I use small nails as my spoon.
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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    I trap it off the bees and eat it daily. I never have good luck getting the actual bee bread out of a cell without all the wax so I don't normally consume it that way

  4. #3
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    I started trapping pollen this year due to increased requests from honey costumers.

    Never tasted bee bread. Ide imagine it tastes better than raw pollen..being mixed with nectar and fermented.

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    I say drop that "nail business" and become serious about harvesting true fermented perga.
    This is exactly what I do (have a kilo of perga in freezer right now).
    Super food, while it is stupid simple to harvest (yet it costs $$$).

    https://www.amazon.com/Bee-Bread-Sea...keywords=perga
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  6. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    This is exactly what I do (have a kilo of perga in freezer right now).
    How do you produce/harvest bee bread?

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    OK, guys, by popular demand...
    This is really basic stuff available on youtube for years...
    Much of the very useful content now days - non-English.

    (Sorry, I can not help with this; knowledge of non-English European languages really, really helps here.
    I wish I knew German to watch German videos/read blogs....
    But Russian/Ukrainian work really well too - lots of great content to read and video channels to watch.
    This is just eye opening, how much content is NOT available in US. Just a shame...
    Video below is just one of many about perga harvesting.
    Ok, enough..).

    Basic steps:
    - harvest old brood combs with perga that are slated for melting
    - freeze them
    - once they are fragile, shred them to dust - the perga capsules will HOLD as they are really hard frozen, but the combs will disintegrate nicely (see video below)
    - sift them (first run - regular queen separator screen; second run - I use #4 mesh, you choose for yourself)
    - hand pick through through the final product if you wish
    - store the final product (unclear what is best, fridge or freeze; people argue - whatever; you choose
    - USE the final product..
    - one way is to mix perga with honey to the consistency of peanut butter and eat a couple of tea spoons a day (that's your power supplement right there)
    - as well, can just consume granules in your oatmeal/salad/what have you

    Finally, I would never buy this product from a hive that has been treated by who knows what chems.
    Hence, here is one clear benefit of going chemical free - perga better be harvested from non-polluted combs.

    Here is a quick home video by one of the coolest Russian beeks - MegaStaratel (just one of many from him - this dude is a really cool innovator; ....August splits for example - a gem):
    I think MegaStaratel is the actual original inventor of the process; at least he has the first public video about it; there are many others just copying his ideas.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKGzFsLxhQA
    Last edited by GregV; 04-24-2018 at 04:49 PM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    A word of warning - I had a pretty strong allergic reaction to some of the first pollen I ever tried. Nothing approaching anaphylactic, thankfully, just a severe sneezing attack. It turned out to be Scrub Oak in my case.
    I've since harvested and consumed pollen - careful to avoid collecting it while the Scrub Oak is blooming. 'Something to consider... it could have gone much, much worse.
    After 40 years of beekeeping, I've come to realize that the bees can fix most of my mistakes.

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Clearly, people are allergic to lots off stuff, pollen included.
    First - start small.
    Once you see that it works for you - go ahead.
    I eat two full teaspoons of my honey/perga mix daily.
    And yet when my 12-year old tried a spoon, within 30 minutes she vomited it all out (this was an overdose for her - perga has strong cleansing action, this is just one of the medicinal properties it has).

    The fermented pollen (perga) is a powerful thing.
    This is what bees themselves eat and feed their larva.

    Raw pollen it is hardly digestible, if at all, by people and bees themselves, and YET this is what is sold to people as "food"?
    Never understood this part.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  10. #9
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    Yeah, I never understand raw pollen. But I've had people ask for it. So I made a couple harvesters. I'm gonna sell it in 2oz hex jars for $5, something like that. Perhaps for some people it's just a novelty to have raw pollen in a jar. Just handling the stuff made me sneaze and itchy. I wasnt interested in eating it.

    So perga is harvested by destroying pollen combs to break away pollen bread capsules inside the cell?

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Correct - you destroy the combs to harvest perga (crush and strain, again; just dry).
    And so, you harvest from the combs that are to be melted anyway for any reason.
    Throwing away and destroying perga - a terrible waste.

    Raw pollen for sale is..... don't now how to say this politely... gimmick?
    But this is not our, beekeepers', fault - I get it.
    Ignorant people have been brainwashed to buy it. Oh well..
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    I'm using my own fresh/frozen bee pollen daily to help with my arthritis. It is not correct to say the raw pollen is gimmicky. Pollen has 2 shells that are very hard and the nutrition is better absorbed if you crack the outer shell. But even if you don't, your digestive system can extract some of the nutrients.IMG_5798.jpg

    I put 1 tablespoon of the frozen pollen in a cup with a bit of lemon juice and let it sit on the counter for about 1 hr (can be overnight). Then I add a tablespoon of raw honey and 3 oz of water and drink.

    I'm taking all the other apitherapy products like propolis, royal jelly and occasionally the bee venom, but it is that level of bee pollen daily that keeps me off the pain meds.

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Quote Originally Posted by ruthiesbees View Post
    I'm using my own fresh/frozen bee pollen daily to help with my arthritis. It is not correct to say the raw pollen is gimmicky. Pollen has 2 shells that are very hard and the nutrition is better absorbed if you crack the outer shell. But even if you don't, your digestive system can extract some of the nutrients.IMG_5798.jpg

    I put 1 tablespoon of the frozen pollen in a cup with a bit of lemon juice and let it sit on the counter for about 1 hr (can be overnight). Then I add a tablespoon of raw honey and 3 oz of water and drink.

    I'm taking all the other apitherapy products like propolis, royal jelly and occasionally the bee venom, but it is that level of bee pollen daily that keeps me off the pain meds.
    It is very good you take full advantage of the bee products. Everyone should do the same!
    I can not even look at the commercial honeys anymore, now that I press my own honey from old brood combs (the best honey!).

    Regarding the raw pollen being a gimmick...
    I can understand most population has to take what it can as it is what is available and they don't know any better.

    But you being a beekeeper - you have access to much more powerful and biologically digestible product - fermented pollen (perga).
    You should take full advantage of it.
    Bio-availability of nutrients in perga is much higher because is fermented by micro-flora in the presence of nectar/honey/"bee spit" (pre-digested or cooked - put it this way).

    Here is a good scientific discussion of pollen usage by bees.
    Notice in the article - bees them-selves do not eat raw pollen.
    Bees eat bee-bread the was already subjected to "cooking".
    They seem to prefer fresh bee-bread, but nevertheless - bee-bread (not raw pollen).
    This is an important take-home point.
    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0175933
    Last edited by GregV; 04-25-2018 at 09:32 AM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    I've always been confused by pollen traps as it seems like the bees would need that pollen or is it just the normal pollen that falls off anyway and would otherwise be trash on the bottom board? Never felt like looking into it but if that many people want it maybe I'll rethink it.

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidgeBees View Post
    I've always been confused by pollen traps as it seems like the bees would need that pollen.......
    Exactly.
    I only collect pollen bees no longer need - from dead-outs.
    Need to have few dead-outs around so to scavenge them - has not been a problem so far.
    Last edited by GregV; 04-25-2018 at 09:18 AM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    So do the pollen traps take pollen they normally would use or is it pollen that has fallen off?

  17. #16
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidgeBees View Post
    So do the pollen traps take pollen they normally would use or is it pollen that has fallen off?
    A typical trap will rob the bees off the pollen they bring in by forcing them through small holes (up to 80% of it).
    So then the bees need to work much harder to get the pollen they need themselves.
    Google it. It is public information.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Ukrainian frame experimentation.

  18. #17
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Quote Originally Posted by ruthiesbees View Post
    I trap it off the bees and eat it daily. I never have good luck getting the actual bee bread out of a cell without all the wax so I don't normally consume it that way
    Ruth, you use beeline top bar hives, correct? Do they sell a compatible trap or have you created your own? I am interested in trapping as well and would love to have something that works with these hives.

  19. #18
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Quote Originally Posted by friendlywithbears View Post
    Ruth, you use beeline top bar hives, correct? Do they sell a compatible trap or have you created your own? I am interested in trapping as well and would love to have something that works with these hives.
    I have modified the plastic front entrance trap for 2 of my hives by taking off the slanted bar that normally goes into the landing board and replaced it with a flat piece of wood. Then I use angle brackets to attach it to the hive. any gaps, because I am a poor carpenter, are sealed up with duct tape.

    I did just find these side entrance traps on ebay from Ukraine. Bought 2 of them late last year, but haven't tried them yet. These don't need to be adapted for the flat wood. Just drill a few new entrance holes in the Beeline hive.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bee-Hive-plastic-Pollen-Trap-Collector-with-removable-Tray-Beekeeping-Tool/142360340262?hash=item2125566726:gKIAAOSw5UZY~d0I

    not sure how the green grin is showing up in the link. if it doesn't work, it is eBay item number:142360340262

  20. #19
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    Default Re: Eating pollen

    Quote Originally Posted by ruthiesbees View Post
    I have modified the plastic front entrance trap for 2 of my hives by taking off the slanted bar that normally goes into the landing board and replaced it with a flat piece of wood. Then I use angle brackets to attach it to the hive. any gaps, because I am a poor carpenter, are sealed up with duct tape.

    I did just find these side entrance traps on ebay from Ukraine. Bought 2 of them late last year, but haven't tried them yet. These don't need to be adapted for the flat wood. Just drill a few new entrance holes in the Beeline hive.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bee-Hive-plastic-Pollen-Trap-Collector-with-removable-Tray-Beekeeping-Tool/142360340262?hash=item2125566726:gKIAAOSw5UZY~d0I

    not sure how the green grin is showing up in the link. if it doesn't work, it is eBay item number:142360340262
    Just what I was looking for. Duct tape is about as good as my carpentry is at this point as well

  21. #20
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    Lynchburg, Va, USA
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    Default

    http://www.fao.org/docrep/w0076e/w0076e11.htm
    Section 3.12.2 has a bee bread recipe. I think it's what they call "home bee bread". I'm using my first batch and have another larger one fermenting now. It's actually pretty tasty

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