Going Plastic
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Thread: Going Plastic

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    20

    Default Going Plastic

    Atm I'm working straight wax foundation, but wiring/melting/soldering is just a pain and it is expensive, since i have to pay a company each year to make foundation out of my wax.

    Also I'm atm going to move from German national hive to Langstroth and in this turn I was also thinking of going straight into using wax foundation.

    Now is the question go full plastic frame or wood frame with plastic foundation.

    Both ways have their appeal, wood specially getting rid of those nasty Hoffman sides and use straight sides with spacing nails.

    Which way would you go? And if so which manufacturer?

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    One big problem I have seen is not enough wax on the plastic. So they did not want to pull it out unless it is on a strong flow.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    271

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    I like the wood frames with plastic foundation. Plastic frames warp a lot, at least in my limited experience with them.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Cullman, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    1,240

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    following
    Started summer of 2013, just another new guy, tinkering with bees.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    6,882

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Why are you calling a Hoffman frame, used tens of millions of times over with few complaints that I have heard, "nasty"?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee
    Posts
    1,467

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Wood frame plastic foundation. Coat with additional wax or get it double coated
    Feeding early patties. https://youtu.be/bUDd3vk7bgY

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    Why are you calling a Hoffman frame, used tens of millions of times over with few complaints that I have heard, "nasty"?
    Just cause they make a lot of extra work, sibce you always have huge ammounts of propolis all over. With wood frames these add up until the last frame doesn't fit propper and u have to scrape it all off. Also you always need some force to break up the block of frames, soecially at the furst controll in spring. A lot more frames break compared to spacing pins and those doesn't need any force to seperate.

    But back to topic, most vote for wooden frames, sounds fine to me, Acon or Man Lake foundation?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    271

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Mann Lake works fine for me. Have read that Acorn is good, not tried it yet.

  10. #9

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Acorn is good I still add wax.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee
    Posts
    1,467

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Acorn is THE stuff
    Feeding early patties. https://youtu.be/bUDd3vk7bgY

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
    Posts
    2,335

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    I have only been at it a couple of years but I prefer the wood frames. The all plastic do warp and My bees like to build a lot of burr comb on the plastic frames. Others have said that they don't have that problem. Mine also do not draw them as fast and adding extra wax helps. Others have observed that the plastic frames have a lot of hiding places for small hive beetle. J

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kirksville, Missouri USA
    Posts
    1,768

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee's Bees LLC View Post
    Acorn is THE stuff
    I agree if it' extra wax. It was always drawn out without issues or hesitation last year, 700 frames. Haven't used plastic frames and never intend to. It doesn't sound appealing. You will enjoy just snapping them in a grooved top and bottom board. Easiest way to go. They have a bit of wax buildup on one long edge of the plastic that goes into the groove, which may be a little hindrance if you are snapping them in when they are cold and it's a 3/32" groove. I have sometimes scraped the edge before inserting.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Troy, MO, USA
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Mann Lake frames Acorn foundation

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    1,229

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    When I got back into beekeeping after a few years out I thought that the all plastic frame would be super convenient.

    I went back to wood frames and I use both plastic and wax foundation. The problem with the all plastic frames that I did not like was that endbars are not solid they have thin channels that trap bees and collect propolis. They also are not quite as strong as a wood frame.
    Zone 6B

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Ok, we got a german producer, who makes the frames without the groves.

    I got some of them, but only used them in supers.

    I now ordered 500 acorn foundations, hopefully no troubles with customs.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Rome, GA
    Posts
    374

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    I've been using Mann Lake wooden frames and Rite Cell foundation with no problems. I paint the foundation with extra wax and I prefer the black foundation for brood. (It makes it much easier to see eggs and larvae).
    Let's Eat Grandmaw ........... Let's Eat, Grandmaw.......Grammar Saves Lives

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    orange county, ca
    Posts
    162

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Mann lake wood frames with Acorn plastic foundation is just right

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Randolph, New York
    Posts
    89

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Quote Originally Posted by robirot View Post
    Atm I'm working straight wax foundation, but wiring/melting/soldering is just a pain and it is expensive, since i have to pay a company each year to make foundation out of my wax.

    Also I'm atm going to move from German national hive to Langstroth and in this turn I was also thinking of going straight into using wax foundation.

    Now is the question go full plastic frame or wood frame with plastic foundation.

    Both ways have their appeal, wood specially getting rid of those nasty Hoffman sides and use straight sides with spacing nails.

    Which way would you go? And if so which manufacturer?
    I've been using plastic Pierce frames for several years which I paint with beeswax. Haven't had any problem with them drawing comb. The key is painting the frames.

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    I go back and forth on this, but at present I am favoring plastic Pierco combo frames and foundations. I add a hand-applied coat of extra beeswax. My bees seem to draw them out eagerly, and they sure are easy to use.

    I want to like wood frames and plastic foundation, but I think they are harder to manage in 10-frame boxes where space is tight.

    I buy black Pierco frames for brood boxes and white for super/honey frames.

    The only advantage that I see with wood is that they are easier to write on, and I leave myself lots of notes.

    Nancy

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    camden, tennessee, USA
    Posts
    311

    Default Re: Going Plastic

    Quote Originally Posted by JConnolly View Post
    When I got back into beekeeping after a few years out I thought that the all plastic frame would be super convenient.

    I went back to wood frames and I use both plastic and wax foundation. The problem with the all plastic frames that I did not like was that endbars are not solid they have thin channels that trap bees and collect propolis. They also are not quite as strong as a wood frame.


    Exactly what I was about to say...

    I have decent luck getting either frame drawn. As often mentioned... Under the right conditions bees just draw wax. Its what they do... Extra wax definitely helps them out if they are not driven to build.

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