Best Varroa Resistant Breed for NH - Page 5
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  1. #81

    Default Re: Best Varroa Resistant Breed

    Quote Originally Posted by NHbeek View Post
    Recommendation is as close to 0% infection as humanly possible going into winter. These mite levels (3 -4%) is the highest recommended treatment threshold for summer.
    What was your count?

    The plan is to treat if mites get over 2% because a hive needs to be in excellent health to even have a chance to overwinter.
    In this case I donīt think you will ever be treatment free.
    Thanks for answering my questions above.

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  3. #82
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    10,148

    Default Re: Best Varroa Resistant Breed

    https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7664.../data=!3m1!1e3

    it may be possible but it may take time. with some luck and careful selection nhbeek may end up with a strain that can make it through the harsh winter in nh even after carrying more of a mite load in the fall.

    if you zoom out on the terrain map you will see that the area around nashau is very wooded.

    jmho, but if i were looking for the best varroa resistant breed for nh, i would search those wooded lands for overwintered feral survivors.

    not finding any ferals surviving winter would suggest to me that the long winters there may be a little more than the european honey bee can easily thrive through, that the short season and/or limited foraging opportunities aren't quite enough to support a typical sized colony to easily reach wintering strength, or perhaps that there aren't many large cavities in the trees having the volume necessary to support a large enough colony along with adequate honey stores for wintering there.

    tim ives is having tf success slightly farther south in indiana by overwintering strong triple 10 frame deeps. he also happens to have nectar availability that is off the charts which allows him to not use syrup and still get 200 - 300 lb harvests.

    i might consider the triple deep set up and some of that stock if i were located in the north to see if those bees with that type management yielded similar results.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  4. #83

    Default Re: Best Varroa Resistant Breed

    with some luck and careful selection
    I consider this a possibility for all beekeepers if they do not fear the work.

    But the threshold nh gives himself seems to be too low IME. It would be interesting to see how high the mite infestation in feral swarms is.

    Purchased "resistant" queen stock does not mean a lower mite count automatically, many factors play a role. Such stock IMO can be evaluated the next season if they are not treated and survive the first winter, our group experienced the F1 as much better after some adaptation happened. But you have to risk tf first and overwinter the F0.

    I would use the local threshold and give the bees some % more. I would go for 5%. or treat if some defect worker bees are observed earlier. But only this colony. Shift the queen or use it elsewhere.

    When I started tf I was going bond and watched the crawlers and mites on bees in a kind of naive way, thought the bees, untreated would be able to purify the hive.
    But no. Not always. But some. Why that is I donīt know yet. Itīs genetics or other circumstances. Working on it.

    The danger starts when a colony shows defect worker bees. The first of them means : over the threshold.
    Threshold of tf stock is much higher than local treated stock but maybe lower than ferals anyway. IMO. Personal experience.

    Iīm much more careful with monitoring and taking action now.
    Last edited by 1102009; 09-14-2018 at 12:38 AM. Reason: more

  5. #84
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    10,148

    Default Re: Best Varroa Resistant Breed

    with the handful of late season alcohol washes i have done i am seeing 8% to 14% infestation rates that do not result in collapse.

    the winters here are relatively mild however. there are scattered opportunities for cleansing flights and even some early tree pollens sometimes in mid to late january.

    t makes me wonder if there is something special about the nutrition here that perhaps results in particularly good fat bodies. i am going to communicate with the research community about the possibility for looking into that.
    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  6. #85
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Nashua, NH, USA
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Best Varroa Resistant Breed

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    with the handful of late season alcohol washes i have done i am seeing 8% to 14% infestation rates that do not result in collapse.

    the winters here are relatively mild however. there are scattered opportunities for cleansing flights and even some early tree pollens sometimes in mid to late january.

    t makes me wonder if there is something special about the nutrition here that perhaps results in particularly good fat bodies. i am going to communicate with the research community about the possibility for looking into that.
    You have more leeway with mite counts than I do. However I think the long winter and spring splits can reset my mite counts to near zero, if only the bees can keep them down through the fall.

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post

    jmho, but if i were looking for the best varroa resistant breed for nh, i would search those wooded lands for overwintered feral survivors.

    not finding any ferals surviving winter would suggest to me that the long winters there may be a little more than the european honey bee can easily thrive through, that the short season and/or limited foraging opportunities aren't quite enough to support a typical sized colony to easily reach wintering strength, or perhaps that there aren't many large cavities in the trees having the volume necessary to support a large enough colony along with adequate honey stores for wintering there.
    There are rumors of feral AMMs in the area. New England kind of sucks for beekeeping, we dont get the enormous nectar flows that people to the west get, but still have the terrible winter. Some people claim to get 100lbs average, so perhaps I ought to seek out better yards.

    Quote Originally Posted by SiWolKe View Post
    What was your count?



    In this case I donīt think you will ever be treatment free.
    Thanks for answering my questions above.
    mites ranged from 9-15 per 300 bees in all colonies but one. The one colony actually went from 8 mites per 300 bees before the tf queen and is now down to 0, but it was started from a really small nuc in the summer...

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