Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Roy, Wa
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    Default Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    I recently acquired about 80 metal bound excluders. They were pretty clean, but I exposed them to heat to sterilize and clean more thoroughly.
    After they were cooled, a wire wheel took of the toasted bits easily, they came out great.
    They are rusty and I was wondering if, while they are not in use it would be a good idea to coat with a light oil for storage. I can spray it off with hot water before using.


    Fire not too hot so they clean up but don't warp. Coals about 1/3 - 1/2 way up the burn barrel. I gave them about a 10-15 minute heat treatment for each batch of about 10 excluders:

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    When I started beekeeping just a few years ago, these were about $3.50 each. Now they are over $7.00. Even in bulk and on sale the cheapest I see them is about $5.50 ea. I needed about 100 of them and that's a chunk of change, I thought I'd try these for now, I can get a couple more years out of them.

    With the price of steel possibly on the rise, I thought I'd grab them anyway. Waste not want not ya know. They were cheap.


    Any thoughts on the oil idea?
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    Finally, an excellent use for FGMO in the apiary!

    Nancy

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    England, UK
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    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    Four thoughts, in order of (my own personal) preference ...

    Do you have any hot-dip galvanisers in the area ? Might be worth getting a quote for sand-blasting and dipping. Certainly not worth doing that for just a few - but 80 might produce a fair price for bulk.

    If you were to set-up a shallow immersion container (plastic or lined with plastic sheeting) then you could use a battery charger and a chunk of sacrificial steel to remove every last trace of rust. Then dry quickly and thoroughly (hot air gun etc) - before giving 'em one good coat of quality paint, Hammerite or similar.

    Any reason not to wipe molten wax over the wires ? That's the sort of stuff that's gonna coat them anyway, once they're in use.

    If you were to wipe cooking oil over the wires, rather than machine oil, then there's be no need to clean them off quite so thoroughly before use - if at all.

    Good buy, BTW.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  5. #4
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    Mar 2014
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    Red Bud, IL, USA
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    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    little john's electrolysis point is a good one. I use the process in restoring old tractors and it's relatively simple and easy process if you have a battery charger. Let me know I you want the directions for setting up a small unit.
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

  6. #5
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    Eikel, I would be interested in the process, please pm me the instructions. If Lauri is going to do that process, she could use the same equipment to electroplate the qe's. I did Cu plating in 8th grade chemistry. The are kits available online for several different coatings but I know copper is real easy, all you need is copper sulfate solution and a piece of copper. And of course, the battery charger.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  7. #6
    Join Date
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    Roy, Wa
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    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    Very interesting!
    I looked it up on you tube, many videos showing the procedure.

    Thanks Little John.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    Why worry? They clean off rust when they squeeze thru.

    Crazy Roland

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Knox, TN
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    73

    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    I would do nothing and use them as is.

  10. #9
    Join Date
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    Roy, Wa
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    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    I wasn't going to fuss with them, just possible oil up for storage if I don't use them all this season.
    But I found the electrolysis suggestion to be interesting.

    My husband has mentioned a few times if he used different metal-steel and aluminum- in his boat in salt water he would get electrolysis. But I had not heard of the term and usage mentioned here. After seeing the youtube videos, I thought of a few things I can use that on.

    They say usage with brass will antique it. But these have also been stored for years and are frozen up. Looks like stainless interior parts.

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    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    York County, VA, USA
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    503

    Default Re: Coating older metal queen excluders with light food grade oil while in storage

    It's my understanding that naval jelly and similar materials (phosphoric acid-based) will convert the iron oxides to less-crumbly iron phosphates, arresting the rust process. Then coat with anything of interest, such as beeswax. You might find that a gallon or a few of appropriate and appropriately diluted material in a flat tray sized to hold/immerse an excluder would do well for your needs. Set the excluders to the side to dry, then possibly spray any particularly vulnerable areas with a spray galvanizing paint. Just a suggestion.

    I've appreciated your contributions on BeeSource. Thank you.

    Michael
    "I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong." (heard often from the late David Sebree) Still making them, myself

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