Net Weight When Selling Pollen?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    284

    Default Net Weight When Selling Pollen?

    I've been selling honey for years but will be selling pollen this year for the first time. I'll be selling it in 8 oz. glass honey jars and I need to have labels printed soon.
    I believe the pollen will weigh about 4 ounces, but it think it may vary depending on moisture content, etc. I will not be drying it...freezing it until sold. There are other
    beekeepers in my area selling pollen and there is no net weight on the label.

    So for those who are selling pollen what is your practice? I'm leaning toward no net weight on the label but would like some feedback from others. I'm not selling in retail
    stores so I'm generally not exposed to the "label police". However, because it's being sold for human consumption, it may technically require a net weight on the label.
    What's your experience in your area?

    Thanks in advance...

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    1,036

    Default Re: Net Weight When Selling Pollen?

    I sell pollen in one pound honey jars that hold about 7 oz. of pollen. It settles in the jar quite a bit so I probably could get 8 oz. if I tapped it down and filled closer to the rim. I do have net weight in ounces and grams but I sell to resellers so my labels get inspected.

    I don't dry the pollen at all. It stays in the freezer until delivered. I tell folks (should have a label) to keep it refrigerated or frozen. If it sits at room temperature for a couple weeks the flavor will get very strong.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: Net Weight When Selling Pollen?

    Thanks Steve, I appreciate your response. It sounds like I'll be doing the same thing as you...freezing the pollen but not drying it. I'll probably bottle it as needed, but I assume I can put jars of unsold pollen back in in the freezer for a short time without problem. What's your experience with freezing pollen already packed in jars?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    1,036

    Default Re: Net Weight When Selling Pollen?

    They can be out of the freezer for some time with no effects. It's not immediately perishable like milk. It's just a long term thing. I freeze pollen in jars all the time. On warm market days, I keep them in a small cooler. I know some folks who dry their pollen. It's not hard, just make a wood frame with window screen and put on a thin layer of pollen. It doesn't take long to dry under a hot sun. Be aware that it only takes a few drops of rain to turn the whole thing to mush.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,019

    Default Re: Net Weight When Selling Pollen?

    Quote Originally Posted by GaSteve View Post
    They can be out of the freezer for some time with no effects. It's not immediately perishable like milk. It's just a long term thing. I freeze pollen in jars all the time. On warm market days, I keep them in a small cooler. I know some folks who dry their pollen. It's not hard, just make a wood frame with window screen and put on a thin layer of pollen. It doesn't take long to dry under a hot sun. Be aware that it only takes a few drops of rain to turn the whole thing to mush.
    Do you freeze the pollen in an open container/bag first to remove some moisture then jar it? I was wondering about the frozen pollen going in a jar, sealing the jar, and then if condensation would form inside the jar when removed from the freezer? Can it go straight from the trap (after inspecting) to the jar and then the sealed jar to the freezer?

    What is the avg price of pollen an ounce now?
    sc-bee

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Garden City S, NY
    Posts
    91

    Default

    May I ask what pollen traps you all are using?

    I’ve seen bottom traps at Mann Lake and the top mounted one Sundance makes. I’m not a fan of having to lift the bottom box to install and remove the bottom trap and the top trap requires the bottom entrance to be closed which puts lots of bees in the air which can make inspections a little more stressful. What I was leaning towards was those plastic traps that are mounted to the front of the bottom entrance. Thoughts/opinions? Thanks all !

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: Net Weight When Selling Pollen?

    I use the Sundance bottom traps and they do an excellent job. Once installed, the entrance is adjustable so the bees can bypass the trap without removing it. I've never used the top traps or any other.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Garden City S, NY
    Posts
    91

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SWM View Post
    I use the Sundance bottom traps and they do an excellent job. Once installed, the entrance is adjustable so the bees can bypass the trap without removing it. I've never used the top traps or any other.
    How was your pollen? I’ve heard the pollen basket can get lots of dirt and debris in it with a bottom trap.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: Net Weight When Selling Pollen?

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeDuto View Post
    How was your pollen? I’ve heard the pollen basket can get lots of dirt and debris in it with a bottom trap.
    That my vary with the brand or age of the trap. I have an old Sundance trap I bought 30 years ago and it does allow quite a bit of debris. They've now been modified/upgraded to allow very little. Of course there is still some and there are several ways to remove it. You can slowly pour the pollen from one container to another in front of a small, slow moving fan. It will blow away the debris but not the pollen. I'm sure there are many other ways to clean it as well. Kelley offers a pollen cleaner which might be worth it depending on how much you have to clean. https://www.kelleybees.com/pollen-cleaner.html

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Garden City S, NY
    Posts
    91

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SWM View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BeeDuto View Post
    How was your pollen? I’ve heard the pollen basket can get lots of dirt and debris in it with a bottom trap.
    That my vary with the brand or age of the trap. I have an old Sundance trap I bought 30 years ago and it does allow quite a bit of debris. They've now been modified/upgraded to allow very little. Of course there is still some and there are several ways to remove it. You can slowly pour the pollen from one container to another in front of a small, slow moving fan. It will blow away the debris but not the pollen. I'm sure there are many other ways to clean it as well. Kelley offers a pollen cleaner which might be worth it depending on how much you have to clean. https://www.kelleybees.com/pollen-cleaner.html
    Makes sense the bottom ones would introduce more debris. Someone else told me they used a bottom one and wasn’t happy with the dirty pollen. She got the Sundance II top mounted trap and is very happy with it. It’s about $80 but looks well made.

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