Site "Not Secure"
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk Co, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,626

    Default Site "Not Secure"

    Is there another issue lately?
    In the address bar there is a symbol indicating that beesource in not secure. Google Chrome.
    Below is the explanation by Google of what the symbol could mean:

    The site isn't using a private connection. Someone might be able to see or change the information you send or get through this site.

    You might see a "Login not secure" or "Payment not secure" message. We suggest that you don't enter sensitive details, like passwords or credit cards.

    On some sites, you can visit a more secure version of the page:

    Select the address bar.
    Delete http://, and enter https:// instead.
    If that doesn't work, contact the site owner to ask that they secure the site and your data with HTTPS.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,527

    Default Re: Site "Not Secure"

    This site isnt secure. https can't be forced on BS
    Zone 5 @ 4700 ft. High Desert

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    1,638

    Default Re: Site "Not Secure"

    using https doesn't make a site secure, it just means that encryption is used on the network link. Why bother? This is a public forum, anybody can read what's posted here, so does it matter that it's not encrypted going to/from your browser ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    328

    Default Re: Site "Not Secure"

    True. HTTPS wouldn't make a big difference here. But, we are planning on implementing it here in the future. It's becoming standard procedure in these days of internet security awareness, and in time not having the certificate will hurt the site's status with security companies, and Google and other search engines.

    No official ETA on when it will be implemented. Hoping for sooner rather then later.

    If you are ever on a site that doesn't have HTTPS, and it asks for credit card info, run the other way

    Kevin

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    1,638

    Default Re: Site "Not Secure"

    Quote Originally Posted by Admin View Post
    True. HTTPS wouldn't make a big difference here.
    Actually, it can have a big performance impact. Browsers will cache far less when the link runs over https, any page that includes an input field, like the one I'm typing in right now, will not be cached by most browsers if it's an https connection, whereas it will get cached if the link is http.

    For an open public forum, it can indeed introduce a significant performance hit most noticeable by folks on a skinny internet connection. All it really solves, is the whining from folks about 'its not https' who dont really know much about the underpinnings, but 'I read it on the internet' told them https = secure. Dont get me started on that train, I can go on forever. A few companies have managed to create a billion dollar business out of selling certificates that make the claim of 'this means the site is secure', when in fact, all it really means is the host has spent money on a certificate that browsers 'accept'. If indeed buying an expensive certificate and switching to https made a site secure, we wouldn't be reading about massive data leaks constantly in the press.

    Now if the goal is just to switch to ssl connections to make folks happy because they read somewhere on the internet that a site is safe and secure due to the little green lock icon in the browser, that's easy to manage in 10 minutes using the automated certificate system from the folks at LetsEncrypt. I've set up a few locations with that system to pacify the folks whining about https , it gets the job done quick and easy without dumping a bunch of cash into the coffers of companies that sell expensive certificates that have no real value in terms of actually securing a website.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk Co, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,626

    Default Re: Site "Not Secure"

    Quote Originally Posted by grozzie2 View Post
    Actually, it can have a big performance impact. Browsers will cache far less when the link runs over https, any page that includes an input field, like the one I'm typing in right now, will not be cached by most browsers if it's an https connection, whereas it will get cached if the link is http.

    For an open public forum, it can indeed introduce a significant performance hit most noticeable by folks on a skinny internet connection. All it really solves, is the whining from folks about 'its not https' who dont really know much about the underpinnings, but 'I read it on the internet' told them https = secure. Dont get me started on that train, I can go on forever. A few companies have managed to create a billion dollar business out of selling certificates that make the claim of 'this means the site is secure', when in fact, all it really means is the host has spent money on a certificate that browsers 'accept'. If indeed buying an expensive certificate and switching to https made a site secure, we wouldn't be reading about massive data leaks constantly in the press.

    Now if the goal is just to switch to ssl connections to make folks happy because they read somewhere on the internet that a site is safe and secure due to the little green lock icon in the browser, that's easy to manage in 10 minutes using the automated certificate system from the folks at LetsEncrypt. I've set up a few locations with that system to pacify the folks whining about https , it gets the job done quick and easy without dumping a bunch of cash into the coffers of companies that sell expensive certificates that have no real value in terms of actually securing a website.
    Sounds like you are a expert in this field grozzie, a real computer programmer instead of one who just utilizes programming written by others to navigate the internet . Apparently, you don't need to rely on what others (even other programmers) have to say so why don't you enlighten all the whining laymen key punchers about security issues? Start with explaining the 3 points from Google in the first post, clear it all up for us.
    Much appreciated.

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