Varroa
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Thread: Varroa

  1. #1
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    Default Varroa

    what is a good solution for keeping a hive from infestation, please . what product to use and how often. I am in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Thanks.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Go to the Honey Bee Health Coalition website and download their Varroa Management Guide. If you read and understand that guide, you'll know more about managing mites than most beekeepers. I'm sure folks here would be happy to answer any follow-up questions you have about the HBHC guide.

    https://honeybeehealthcoalition.org/varroa/

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Arthur View Post
    Go to the Honey Bee Health Coalition website and download their Varroa Management Guide. If you read and understand that guide, you'll know more about managing mites than most beekeepers. I'm sure folks here would be happy to answer any follow-up questions you have about the HBHC guide.

    https://honeybeehealthcoalition.org/varroa/
    A perfect response.

    beesareok - you will not prevent infestation, your goal is to manage. The resource suggested above will greatly assist you in doing that.

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Agree!

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Gentlemen, thank you for your wise responses.I have a little to add . There is a solution that is prepared at home, then soaked in a blue paper and then this wet paper is folded and placed on top of the frames of the brood frames where the queen is. Could you please tell me what is the description of these 2 products and the blending ammt. of each of these products. One is a powder and the other one is a liquid, and also, please, the description of this blue paper. You see, I know some people that use it, but they do not disclose the information. unreal? yes it is unreal, but true. Thank you all, best regards.

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Varroa

    The oxalic acid towel method has been discussed at length on this forum over the past year, so you may want to do a search for more info. In the meantime, here's Randy Oliver's webpage on the topic (he invented, or at least popularized, the method):

    http://scientificbeekeeping.com/oxal...towel-updates/

    I did a video last spring showing how I make the towels. To be honest, the towels seemed to have a very limited impact, at best, in my hives, and I still had to use other control techniques to keep mites from killing all my bees this year. I'll probably tweak the recipe and give them another shot next year, but I'd warn you from using the towels without doing any other kind of monitoring or treatments.

    https://youtu.be/rlgqEInjdXM

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Varroa

    That would be using fan Oxalic Acid / Glycerin solution in a method devised by Randy Oliver -- look up his information on the Scientific Beekeeping web site.

    Varroa control needs to practiced in an integrated management system. I highly recommend that you read the above suggested material so you understand the different methods of mite control as well as how and when to use them. All the chemical controls, whether hard or soft chemicals, have temperature ranges that they work in as well as different cycles of brood development where they are effective, etc. You can find most of that information in the honeybee health coalition information.

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Varroa

    I feel I need to point out that this sort of use is illegal in the US, and that appropriate amounts of the solution and ratios of OA to glycerin are still being worked out. You may not care; me, I'll let someone else find what works and go through the approval process. I have legal organic solutions that work for me.

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Dewey View Post
    I feel I need to point out that this sort of use is illegal in the US, and that appropriate amounts of the solution and ratios of OA to glycerin are still being worked out. You may not care; me, I'll let someone else find what works and go through the approval process. I have legal organic solutions that work for me.

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Thank you all very much. Mr. Dewey, could you please let me know, in detail, your method using organic solutions? I am not interested in the Oaxalic/Glycerin combination any more,if it is illegal, Thanks.

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Varroa

    You really should take the excellent advice already given, read the material provided, and stick to proven methods. From what I gather through your responses, you do not have the experience needed to participate in experimental treatments, even if they do show promise. (This response is directed only to beeareok)

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Quote from andrew dewey
    I feel I need to point out that this sort of use is illegal in the US, and that appropriate amounts of the solution and ratios of OA to glycerin are still being worked out. You may not care; me, I'll let someone else find what works and go through the approval process. I have legal organic solutions that work for me.
    I only partially agree with this. I give a differrent perspective but not to promote what you do but more just for a chance to reflect on stuff that does happen.

    Wether talking about talkic or the glysorine or other things that can be checked and compared seintifically, Most that actually put a process though the gov for approval, do so for a profit margine. When doing this, a spicific product is usually developed for sale. What normally happens is that a spicific product is tested and then put for sale at some where between $5 to $10 per hive treatment. Many times this is not with a product that some one invented but more of something that is being done that is grabbed and persued in a way to make it profitable.

    Most times the end result is is a bennifit for beekeepers in some way. However, if the same product can be made at home for $0.50 compared to buying it at $5 and the same sience works out for the use of the home and the for sale product, then the for sale product will be legal and the home will not but the results to the mites will be equal. So apivar becomes a legal mite treatment but is kinda expensive and I have no doubt that many are buying the chemical in bulk and treaten hundreds and thousands of hives for pennys on the dollar.

    Shop towels are going to be simular. It has been used a long time in italy and other places and now will go though a process to be made legal and the end result will probly be a product for sale like the Allencaps (spelled wrong) are in mexico. This is a good thing cause many who would just buy something to keep a few hives will have an oppertunity with no hassle to have one more over the shelf product to buy on demand. Knowing this is not going to make the knowlage go away that seintifically you will be able to get the same results on a big scale for much cheeper.

    I don't begrudge a company that jumps through hoops to make a profit but also know that just because an ideal is grabbed with a profit motive that the fact will remain that it can still be the same ideal that worked before it is grabbed that will still work. I do not write this to say that randy is only doing the testing for aproval with a profit motive. I write it to say this is the system we live in and how it works.

    I am not promoting that others decide to break the law but just saying that I would not look down on people that are doing things that make finacial sense and that are just as safe and and effective.

    Wood bleach was used before olicix acid was approved and now is approved. There were many seintific studies to relie on its use before it became an autherized product. It is better that it is now approved but does not change that olixic sold at 98% pure is still olixic.

    JMHO
    gww
    zone 5b

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    I only partially agree with this. I give a differrent perspective but not to promote what you do but more just for a chance to reflect on stuff that does happen.
    gww
    Does that apply to farmers, growers, pesticide applicators as well? Can they make up their own, safe and proven, formulas to save some money and not follow the label?
    Not arguing, just asking at this point.

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Quote Originally Posted by beesareok View Post
    Thank you all very much. Mr. Dewey, could you please let me know, in detail, your method using organic solutions? I am not interested in the Oaxalic/Glycerin combination any more,if it is illegal, Thanks.
    You are getting the cart before the horse here, beesareok. Get the education as was suggested above before you go looking for a specific mite control method, material, or plan. Learn how to keep bees and manage mites before you simply go throwing things in your hive not knowing what you don't know.
    Mark Berninghausen

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Varroa

    Just to give the due credit: Ricardo Prieto and Fernando Esteban, a commercial beekeeper and a food chemist, respectively, are among those who, through years of hard work, have come up with the idea and then with a commercial product.

  17. #16

    Default Re: Varroa

    beesareok, you started on this forum in 2008 so we have to assume you have had bees for a while or you are getting back into it. If you have been keeping bees this whole time without varroa knowledge and have successfully kept your bees alive then that possibly changes what you may or may not want to be doing.
    Please let us know what your status with bees have been for the last 9 years. That being said the advice already given for knowledge was dead on and every beekeeper should glean every ounce of info they can on the different pests and diseases that can affect their colonies with varroa at the top of the list.

  18. #17
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    Default Re: Varroa

    sqkcrk
    You are getting the cart before the horse here, beesareok. Get the education as was suggested above before you go looking for a specific mite control method, material, or plan. Learn how to keep bees and manage mites before you simply go throwing things in your hive not knowing what you don't know.


    Marcin
    I only partially agree with this. I give a differrent perspective but not to promote what you do but more just for a chance to reflect on stuff that does happen.
    gww
    Does that apply to farmers, growers, pesticide applicators as well? Can they make up their own, safe and proven, formulas to save some money and not follow the label?
    Not arguing, just asking at this point.
    I can not say that I am that versed in big ag. I can say that comercial green houses and smaller farmers market guys do use things like baking soda, dish soap and oil mixes and such for bug control and fungus control. I have read where if this stuff is detectable that the stuff could be confiscated and it is illegal to come up with home remodies but that it is also a wide spred practice that many of the shows on gardening on tv promote. Like all things, it probly comes down to scale and there are times when the money adds up more then time and other times that paying the money to save the time becomes more important.

    I think most people try to figure out what is right and don't want to hurt anyone but also don't forget what they learned from thier grandma and granpa unless something gets enough proof to merit the changes. I know sasafrass tea is now listed as a bad thing and there are stories where people who have drank a lot of it have had blood coming to the surface of thier skin but that some people still will drink it. The differrance now might be how much they drink.

    I really don't have as much experiance on growing crops as much as I would have with small scale animal raising.
    I don't really know the answer to what you are asking.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  19. #18
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    Default Re: Varroa

    beesareok: The Honey Bee Health Coalition document is about the clearest, most concise, and most accurate response you will get to your questions. In Miami, you will likely not use the same treatment regimines or methodologies that a beekeeper in Ohio would use. For instance, you likely always have some capped brood in your colonies, while others will have lengthy brood breaks in the winter months. This creates radically different protocols and approaches to varroa control.

    A beekeeper from Virginia may really be having good luck controlling varroa populations with MAQS. You probably will never be able to use MAQS due to your warm climate. I know I can't use it in south Alabama.

    Randy Oliver has had some preliminary success with OA/Glycerin shop towels in his dry climate in northern California, but the University of Georgia has had a mixed bag of results with that approach in the humid Southeast. Miami has a unique climate. You would be much better served speaking to your local beekeepers about the products they use and the timing of applications in your area.

    To share with you what I am doing, in 2016, I exclusively used OAV. However, I found myself having to perform several intervals for several rounds to keep my varroa in check. In 2017, I did Spring OAV and Fall Apiguard and I have maintained acceptable mite counts with that approach. I will hit them again with OAV this weekend and then I hope to call it a season until March. But you need to take that for what it is worth -- which should not be a lot to a beek from Miami.

  20. #19
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    Miami, Fl, USA
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    Default Re: Varroa

    you are correct , I do not have the experience, thanks, I will follow thru on your advise.

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