Catching robber bees and making them your own. - Page 3
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  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Cape Town South Africa
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    36

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Very interesting
    It has been tried here in South Africa with sucess.

    Here in the Western Cape provence we have the Cape Bee (Capensis)
    It is difficult to split the Cape Bee with nurse bees around and unhatched brood.
    As soon as brood emerges and no queen is present, then they become laying workers. They also normally tear down any existing queen cells. We have probably the worst kind of bee when it comes to laying workers.
    So here we have to try to split with foraging bees.
    This method would work well with our bees even if you" stole" foragers from your own apiary.

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  3. #42
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Cape Town South Africa
    Posts
    36

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Very interesting
    It has been tried here in South Africa with sucess.

    Here in the Western Cape provence we have the Cape Bee (Capensis)
    It is difficult to split the Cape Bee with nurse bees around and unhatched brood.
    As soon as brood emerges and no queen is present, then they become laying workers. They also normally tear down any existing queen cells. We have probably the worst kind of bee when it comes to laying workers.
    So here we have to try to split with foraging bees.
    This method would work well with our bees even if you" stole" foragers from your own apiary.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    international falls, Mn
    Posts
    699

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    I wouldn't bat an eye about the ethics of robber bees, because 3/4ths of them would be mine anyway :}
    And here is a little bit of practical application of the robbing of robber bees ;]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryMUzy3lVRY

    ==McBee7==

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    4,646

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    It's likely to cost more in queens, honey and time than you could gain. Foragers are old bees you are likely to have a hive full of bees that live a few weeks, not even long enough to raise a brood cycle.

    Increase avenues to pick up diseases. If there are any diseases in a three mile circle you will have them.

    Just set swarm traps, you are likely to get more and better quality bees with little a lot less work.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    5,604

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerPlanter View Post
    Just set swarm traps, you are likely to get more and better quality bees with little a lot less work.
    This topic makes for interesting coffee table discussion, but I agree with FlowerPlanter. From a practical perspective it really doesn't make much sense.

    If catching swarms is not an option then spending a little extra time nurturing an existing colony would be much more practical, and safer, than devoting time to gathering up a mixed bag of forager bees and cobbling together a questionable starter hive. With a little additional effort put into an existing colony early in the season you could do a spring split and end up with 2 good colonies.

    I guess if you have time to kill, rustling bees could be an interesting experiment. But for me anyway, time is precious and I prefer to try to use it wisely.
    To everything there is a season....

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Tsawwassen, BC, Canada
    Posts
    530

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Whether or not this makes sense, or works, it would in any case be stealing forager bees from all your nearby beekeepers (and your own colonies as well). That makes the practice both unethical and unwise.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    international falls, Mn
    Posts
    699

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Well I hope you have written your neighbor out a check for the multiple drones that mated with your "ethical" virgin queens ,which caused them to die ,while you profit from his genetic pool..
    I don't intend to pollute your punch bowl, but you are trying to control and quantify what mother nature designed to thrive out of diversity.

    And the only thing your box full of robber bees lack is a queen cell and a frame of emerging brood to care for the queen and give you more bees for the next 6 weeks, replacing the old robbers that are riding off into the sunset....sounds like a easy split to me...

    ==McBee7==

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    5,007

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    It must be really cold in International Falls...
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,467

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cape Bee View Post
    Very interesting
    It has been tried here in South Africa with sucess.

    Here in the Western Cape provence we have the Cape Bee (Capensis)
    It is difficult to split the Cape Bee with nurse bees around and unhatched brood.
    As soon as brood emerges and no queen is present, then they become laying workers. They also normally tear down any existing queen cells. We have probably the worst kind of bee when it comes to laying workers.
    So here we have to try to split with foraging bees.
    This method would work well with our bees even if you" stole" foragers from your own apiary.
    correct me if I'm wrong: Aren't those laying workers capable of laying female eggs and so are in effect a "queen"?
    Lawrence Heafner
    15 hives; 17 years; TF for 12; Zone 7B

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    5,007

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Nope. Laying workers lay unfertilized eggs. Drones. Althouh, if you dress the drone in a skirt, you could call him a queen.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    wrightsville beach, nc
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Check out the Cape Bee JWPalmer. I think Heaflaw is correct. Seems I saw a Jamie Ellis (Ga boy from Univ. of Florida I think) talk on you tube where he studied bees down there,, and the Cape Bee is capable of workers laying female eggs if the queen is gone. Or something weird like that---I have to look it up tonight.

    I plan to go to South Africa and rustle up a bunch of those, combine them with some of your Italian "queen" drones with Russian and africanized genetics, and see what happens!! NOT.

    Also, that old case law that you provided from UNC Law Review was great as to how swarms and bees and the establishment of ownership. What was interesting were those cases where bees killed those horses because the hives were too close to a road, etc. That has to be a helluva thing for bees to kill something the size of a horse.

    McBee7

    That was a great video. Thats what Im talkin bout! This guy was just using a hive instead of a trap, and was probably catching mainly his own bees. He seemed to like the method though, and looked like a primo way to stop robbing.

    I may set something up down in the swamp next year and catch some bees and try this again with a new queen. Our land down there backs up to thousands of acres of gamelands, and I am fairly certain that there are no beeks around for 5 or so miles. Its pretty desolate back there are and full of bears.

    But i did see a lot of honeybees in a field working the goldenrods in the fall. The only thing they grow for miles around there is corn and soybeans, so I am guessing a lot of those bees are feral. They were darker in color than the ones I had for sure, and seemed a bit smaller in size.

    Maybe I will get my snake boots and go bee hunting this spring like that Tom Seely guy, and try to see where they go and find a tree they are in. If there are feral bees around, there should be some back there- ON OUR LAND-----I think everything else is back in those deep woods and swamp, probably a Bigfoot too. Seeing if those older foragers can regress to their previous jobs in the hive is what would interest me.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    wrightsville beach, nc
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    OK. here is Jamie Ellis talking about bees----I think this guy has forgot more about bees than I will ever know.

    At 19:50 he talks about Cape Bees.

    At 49 minutes he addresses my bee duty regression question and how they can jump and regress tasks depending on the hive condition.

    Happy cold weather viewing--its long but a lot of interesting facts, esp the mating cycles and drones.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmZjElSC-po

  14. #53
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    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
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    5,007

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Well I'll bee dipped and smothered in onions. According to wiki, some Cape bees are able to produce fertilized eggs. It appears to be a recesive trait but nonetheless, it exists. Wintertime is great time to relearn everything you thought you knew.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  15. #54
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Dickson TN
    Posts
    1,943

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Well I'll bee dipped and smothered in onions. According to wiki, some Cape bees are able to produce fertilized eggs. It appears to be a recesive trait but nonetheless, it exists. Wintertime is great time to relearn everything you thought you knew.
    It's what's known as Thelytoky pretty common in Cape bees.

  16. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    international falls, Mn
    Posts
    699

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    It must be really cold in International Falls...
    Got up to 19 above today, JW, but yesterday morning it was -7F . Which is why I'll be in your area Christmas time
    I've got a daughter in the Louisa Va.area and another near Releigh, Nc. So warm it up next week, would you please

    ==McBee7==

  17. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    international falls, Mn
    Posts
    699

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    It must be really cold in International Falls...
    Got up to 19 above today, JW, but yesterday morning it was -7F . Which is why I'll be in your area Christmas time
    I've got a daughter in the Louisa Va.area and another near Releigh, Nc. So warm it up next week, would you please

    ==McBee7==

  18. #57
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    5,007

    Default Re: Catching robber bees and making them your own.

    I've heard it said that when I talk the surrounding air temperature increases significantly. I'll do my best to warm it up around here.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

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