Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey
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  1. #1
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    Default Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Anyone else see the Nov. 2017 issue of Consumer Reports, page 30 listing honey as unhealthy and equating it to table sugar? I hope nobody reads that national publication. It states adding honey is just like adding table sugar. Really? That is not going to help sales of a healthy product. Everything in moderation.

    I knew I should have gone into growing sugar cane instead of wasting my time with these bees.

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  3. #2
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    For the most part this is true. Honey maybe worse in a way, it's pretty high in fructose and like more like HCS than table sugar.

    If you are watching carbs and sugar it's basically just sugar.

    Of course it has nutrients and biochemicals and minerals that table sugar does not.

    If you are watching carbs to loose weight or due to diabetes or pre-diabetes the benefits of honey are easy to inflate of you are in denial about sugar and carbs.

    I don't think sucn an article will greatly impact honey buyers. If you look around at the obesity in America, it's apparent that the anti carb messages are not being heeded.

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    The FDA with their labeling requirements concurs ... for a while they even wanted honey labeled as having "added sugar". And yes, that's mostly what it is.

    The real benefit to honey, in my opinion, is that it is expensive, far more so than table sugar (either beet or cane), and way more than corn syrup. So one would hope it is used more sparingly. It has more flavor than refined sugars, so one can learn to use it in moderation and enjoy the taste, rather than simply sweetening without adding any flavor but sweet.

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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebee View Post
    The FDA with their labeling requirements concurs ... for a while they even wanted honey labeled as having "added sugar". And yes, that's mostly what it is.

    The real benefit to honey, in my opinion, is that it is expensive, far more so than table sugar (either beet or cane), and way more than corn syrup. So one would hope it is used more sparingly. It has more flavor than refined sugars, so one can learn to use it in moderation and enjoy the taste, rather than simply sweetening without adding any flavor but sweet.
    +1

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    It only takes one taste of raw unfiltered real honey to tell the difference. There is no comparison to table sugar.

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Hmm. Sugar is pure sucrose.

    Why have so many health issues (such as diabetes, etc.) seem to have grown into such a big problem *after* refined sugar came into wide use, and wasn't so big a problem when honey (maple syrup, etc.) were in wider use?

    Why do bees reject sugar over honey?
    How often has honey been linked to tooth decay?

    Sugar is composed of 100% sucrose.

    Sugar (sucrose) is must be processed in the body.

    Honey contains about 38% fructose, 30% glucose, and 1.3% sucrose, plus proteins (including enzymes) - ph of 4+/-.

    Fructose contains fewer carbs than sucrose.
    The body absorbs (and makes use of) fructose and glucose very easily.

    I do not see much likeness...... They are both "sweet".

    Put 1 TBS of sugar in your mouth.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    I have never taken a whole lot of what Consumer Reports has to say as acurate. I know they are supposed to be non-bias but I really believe they are.
    4a

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Don't imply that diabetes has not been around for a very long time. Physicians have described it since the about 1500 BC. However, the connection to the pancreas was only discovered around 1889. It was well known ages before then that sugar was being passed in the urine.

    The connection to sucrose, more particularly to the economical bulk production of white sugar, is certainly a factor in the increase in diabetes, but you must also consider that the ability to diagnose it is relatively recent. We really don't know the historical incidence. But it is a fair bet that our modern sweet tooth, fueled by shiploads of cane sugar originally and other forms more recently, have increased incidence.

    But your arguments about the forms of sugar in honey are weak. If you dissolve sucrose in water and let it stand, you'll get "simple syrup". The dissociation of sucrose (a di-saccharide) into its constituent glucose and fructose molecules will happen even without sucrases and invertases. Adding those can push the dissociation to full inverted sugar syrup. In any case, if this is not done before consumption, the body will do it promptly. Once ingested and hit by our digestive enzymes, honey, table sugar, or syrup, it is all so similar as to make little difference biochemically or metabolically. There is a great deal of "likeness".

    The real difference is quantity. A cola with 16 teaspoons of sugar in it is Bad For You. Several a day are a death wish. Masses of sugar in everything we eat is bad public health policy.

    But a half a teaspoon of honey in your green tea a couple of times a day ought to be pretty harmless for most people, and if it encourages them to drink fluids like the doctor said, may be good for them. Reducing quantity to restore moderation is the key. If people will switch from heaping spoonfuls of refined sugar to a smidgen of honey, and find they're more satisfied because of the excellent taste, that's where the difference lies.

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    I don’t believe much of anything consumer reports says anymore. I’ve owned vehicles that they have rated poor and they have turned out to be far better than they state, example I bought a 2017 Nissan Frontier that they stated as getting poor gas mileage averaging 15mpg, yet I average 18-19 every tank and have gotten as high as 24mpg. Not trying to derail the thread with details about my truck just stating that I disregard about anything they say, as I will this

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by Aroc View Post
    I have never taken a whole lot of what Consumer Reports has to say as acurate. I know they are supposed to be non-bias but I really believe they are.
    I have not seen the article yet (I think we still get the mag but my wife would get it first). For a nutritional article like this, check the source and see if they're not citing some source such as the FDA or Surgeon General. You may not like what you're being told, but it is probably based in fact at some level.

    However, the Surgeon General does not say we should cut out sugars entirely. They do recommend reducing added sugars, but advise "all things in moderation."

    https://www.surgeongeneral.gov/prior...thy-eating.pdf

    I have caught Consumer Reports in some silly errors in the past. Some decades back they had an egregiously bad comparative test of the effects of plant growth lamps, for example, conducted by someone who had no idea how plants respond to sunlight.

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Phoebee:
    So your saying sucrose, fructose, and glucose are all the same to the human body?

    And your saying that because sucrose can break down to fructose and glucose - that makes it the same?

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    MikeJ, have you seen the discussions around here about making invert sugar syrup to feed bees? Make up sucrose syrup and add a little cream of tartar or lemon juice? Acid promotes hydrolysis of the fairly weak bond holding the two component molecules together. Now, what do you find in the stomach? Acid!

    By the time sucrose hits your bloodstream, it is equal parts glucose and fructose.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebee View Post
    MikeJ, have you seen the discussions around here about making invert sugar syrup to feed bees? Make up sucrose syrup and add a little cream of tartar or lemon juice? Acid promotes hydrolysis of the fairly weak bond holding the two component molecules together. Now, what do you find in the stomach? Acid!

    By the time sucrose hits your bloodstream, it is equal parts glucose and fructose.
    I definitely do not have a BS in biology (though it is a very interesting thing to study - with an objective eye of what is "known"). So in the knowledge of science in biology I would have to concede to you.

    I thought glucose was the only sugar to reach the blood stream?

    I do realize that sucrose is split with acid.

    I am afraid I will still object to the idea that honey is the same as table sugar.
    Honey contains many things that table sugar does not, and does not react with the body in ways table sugar does.
    I realize "science" will tell me one thing in many cases such as this - but when it does not show itself to be true by experience (I know how my body reacts to table sugar as apposed to honey and other "natural" sugars - - and no I am not a "health nut" by the farthest stretch), I can not simply bring myself to nod in agreement.

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    It is true that honey is basically sugar.

    But. Processed sugar is just dead carbs. Honey at least has a few added extras. Here at home we now have no processed sugar in the pantry at all, just some honey. We have discovered how to replace all our sugar needs with honey. Thing with that, is our overall sugar consumption has reduced hugely, I think it's just because when we had processed white sugar, a spoonful, or a cupful, is just so easy to throw into the baking. Although for us honey is free, for some reason, we just think about it more when we use it.

    I tell my friends to not buy sugar and use honey, and have had positive feedback that people think this has reduced their overall sugar consumption. Which based on my own experience, is very probably true.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Honey also *taste* sweeter than table sugar (high % of fructose) and so less in needed to get the sweetness. This means less carbs as well.

  17. #16
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeJ View Post
    I am afraid I will still object to the idea that honey is the same as table sugar.
    I dont belive anyone on this thread made that assertion. Paraphrasing, I think the statment was that the body metabolizes sucrose the same as fructose and glucose because sucrose is converted into those sugars in the digestive tract. Honey clearly has benefits that refined table sugar does not. Besides that , it tastes better.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  18. #17
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Post #1

  19. #18
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    My understanding of english must be slightly different than yours. The words "equating to" and "just like" are comparatives. That is not the same as saying they are the same. The smell of Limburger cheese may be equated to the smell of dirty sweat socks, but that doesnt mean that it IS dirty sweat socks. Just the same bacterium.

    PS. Its all in fun. Find humor whenever life offers it.

    Now I need to wash some socks...
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  20. #19
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey


  21. #20
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    Default Re: Consumer Reports Magazine November 2017 issue Unhealthy Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    The smell of Limburger cheese may be equated to the smell of dirty sweat socks, but that doesnt mean that it IS dirty sweat socks. Just the same bacterium.

    Now I need to wash some socks...
    The smell of dirty socks I know well. Maybe one day I'll smell Limburger cheese, but the stories have not been conducive to the experiment. And goldenrod does not bloom in our valley, so I have yet to experience the joys of smelling the nectar curing in a hive. So maybe you kind folks can tell me which smells like which.

    Obviously it would be really bad to assume the smell means they're all the same. There probably is something worse to eat than Limburger.

    I must agree entirely that honey tastes better than refined white sugar.

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