harvest
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Thread: harvest

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Garden City, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default harvest

    A week ago I checked the hive and my honey frames are about 40-50% capped. Checked again today and not much more progress, but more frames filling up with uncapped honey. When should I expect to harvest? Seems to be getting late in the season, but honestly, I wouldn't know as this is my first year to harvest. I'm in SW Kansas.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,861

    Default Re: harvest

    Do you have snows there during the winter time?
    If you do then consider leaving the honey for them to overwinter in. After the winter is over, maybe you can extract and
    feed them syrup before the new flow is on. This way they will not starve to dearth. If you do extract then consider leaving
    some for them too and give them sugar bricks to overwinter also.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Garden City, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: harvest

    We get some snow and we have warm days too. We typically don't get any snow until January-March. I'm still seeing bees returning to the hive with pollen and this is the first time this year that they've been actively stocking away honey. There are full frames of honey, but only about 50% capped right now. I'd like to pull at least a couple frames of honey, if it doesn't get too cold or too late in the season, and they get them capped. I'm just not sure when harvest time typically is?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,861

    Default Re: harvest

    If you have 2 supers full and are capped then you can harvest one. And leave the other one for
    them to overwinter in. Then add the sugar bricks on the top bars honey frames.
    Another option is to extract all the supers then feed them the syrup to overwinter. For this to work you have to
    time it out right so that the syrup is cap too. You don't want a wet nectar environment during the winter time when
    they need all the dry environment they can inside. Moisture from the bees will soften the sugar bricks for the bees to
    eat on flying days. When in doubt just leave them one box of honey along with the sugar bricks. Maybe someone in your
    area can help you out better. Leaving 130 lbs. is the standard I've read for overwintering depending on how many bees you
    have in a hive.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

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