Suggestions for managing singles for honey production - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,406

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Likely. Either way, you either have a situation where a second queen wasn't found so we can't prove she existed, or you are trying to prove she didn't exist (which its impossible to prove a negative). Which puts us at an impasse.

    The question then becomes: Would you prefer to believe a queen was capable of laying almost 4,000 eggs per day or not?

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    St Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    2,274

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Something I read posted over at another forum by Allen Dick:

    "In my personal real-life experience, going through thousand of my hives frame by
    frame in spring and summer, and thousands of other peoples' hives in spring as a
    bee inspector, I can only recall seeing, *at most*, 10 to 16 frames WITH brood
    on both sides -- not twelve frames OF solid brood (both sides) -- in *any*
    normal single queen hive. The hives that had the twelve frames *with* brood
    actually would have areas of more like 8 or 9 frames of solid brood (each with
    two sides) when measured, and allowance made for the empty cells or cells of
    honey and pollen...


    "...The conclusion I reach here is what I have always said: in our country the
    maximum brood area is eight to nine 100% FULL frames (2 [email protected] 100% = one frame)
    of brood in good single hives at the peak of the season. ..."

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    3,065

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    you either have a situation where a second queen wasn't found so we can't prove she existed
    Either way, it happened in 1991 which is 26 years ago. I am personally not too worried over how much brood a queen produces, just that she produces enough to make a good crop of honey. I tend to notice number of frames of brood during spring management. Johno, she was clipped, not marked.
    NW Alabama, 50 years, 20 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    4,192

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Don't forget that the queens ability to lay eggs may not be limited by her ovaries, but rather her abiility to find an empty cell without traveling too far.

    Crazy Roland

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    6,645

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Foster Collins View Post
    Something I read posted over at another forum by Allen Dick:

    "In my personal real-life experience, going through thousand of my hives frame by
    frame in spring and summer, and thousands of other peoples' hives in spring as a
    bee inspector, I can only recall seeing, *at most*, 10 to 16 frames WITH brood
    on both sides -- not twelve frames OF solid brood (both sides) -- in *any*
    normal single queen hive. The hives that had the twelve frames *with* brood
    actually would have areas of more like 8 or 9 frames of solid brood (each with
    two sides) when measured, and allowance made for the empty cells or cells of
    honey and pollen...


    "...The conclusion I reach here is what I have always said: in our country the
    maximum brood area is eight to nine 100% FULL frames (2 [email protected] 100% = one frame)
    of brood in good single hives at the peak of the season. ..."
    I concur.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Yuba County, California, USA
    Posts
    6,572

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    I have used eight frame deep on the bottom under an excluder. Every frame gets filled with brood, they need a little more space I think to accommodate pollen and nectar around the brood. I think it would have worked better with ten frames, but all I had then was 8 frames.

  8. #27

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Interesting thread because since I started beekeeping in 2014 I never had a hive with less than 8 brood combs dadant in june before splitting. Since april I had used two deep.

    The highest number was 16 combs, here is my record:
    28.06.2016
    Das Volk hat 16 Brutwaben und belegt 2 Dadantzargen komplett, deshalb habe ich es geteilt.
    I did two splits using 8 combs each. Could have made 8 splits if I was experienced then and did not listen to my mentor.

    Here a pict of one comb:
    A AMM.jpg

    The problem is that this hive which was splitted again this year after surviving breeds the mites like crazy.
    And they never had a surplus of honey. They use it all for Brood. AMM-Buckfast hybrids.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    473

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Quote Originally Posted by SiWolKe View Post
    The highest number was 16 combs, here is my record:
    [...]
    And they never had a surplus of honey. They use it all for Brood. AMM-Buckfast hybrids.
    Heh. Slow down Queeny. No bueno, no bueno.
    Somebody forgot to give my bees a copy of the book.
    Zone 6B

  10. #29

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Quote Originally Posted by m0dem View Post
    Heh. Slow down queeny.
    Itīs how genetics work in my eyes.
    They come from the south where they are local survivor production stock from a commercial tf beekeeper, tf for 16 years.
    Only two months of rainy weather as winter and 10 months of flow, sometimes a draught.
    For him, this is perfect: much breeding and much honey. His mite losses can be replaced by ferals with the same genes.

    This will not work where I am. Itīs getting better with the descendants, making more honey so I donīt have to feed, and less brood, but will need more years to adapt.
    So next year the queens will be shifted, if the colonies survive the mites.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Miami, Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    9,340

    Default Re: Suggestions for managing singles for honey production

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Foster Collins View Post
    Something I read posted over at another forum by Allen Dick:

    "In my personal real-life experience, going through thousand of my hives frame by
    frame in spring and summer, and thousands of other peoples' hives in spring as a
    bee inspector, I can only recall seeing, *at most*, 10 to 16 frames WITH brood
    on both sides -- not twelve frames OF solid brood (both sides) -- in *any*
    normal single queen hive. The hives that had the twelve frames *with* brood
    actually would have areas of more like 8 or 9 frames of solid brood (each with
    two sides) when measured, and allowance made for the empty cells or cells of
    honey and pollen...


    "...The conclusion I reach here is what I have always said: in our country the
    maximum brood area is eight to nine 100% FULL frames (2 [email protected] 100% = one frame)
    of brood in good single hives at the peak of the season. ..."
    Yes

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