How many splits from 1 hive?
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Scipio, Indiana
    Posts
    68

    Default How many splits from 1 hive?

    This year, I ran 5 new nucs. They have successfully grown, drew out combs fully on both brood chambers (2 deeps each hive). They all now have honey supers on them with very minor hopes of get a smidge of honey this year.

    My question is this. I'm looking forward to expanding my apiary next year, and would like to prepare now for the amount of supplies (nuc boxes, hive bodies, etc) I'll need for the expansion.

    Can anyone tell me from experience, about how many splits I could make from each of my hives next year? This assumes of course they survive the winter. Thank you!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    caddo parsh, louisiana (aka east texas)
    Posts
    133

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    i guess it depend on when drones are flying when you can create splits. I started with 5 x 5 frame nucs this year and now I have 11 hives. I'm still working on getting queens in two or three. I could do more splits but I'd rather get some honey this fall and I dont need anymore bees. I just want to buffer incase I lose some during the winter. One of the mistakes I made was I split all my hives. It worked out OK, but I noticed that each week I was pulling brood frames from my big hives. If anything went sour then I could have wasted lots of resources. From that walk away slit I lost 1 hive from beetles and another from a wax moth. I should have made nucs instead of walk away splits due to resources lost.

    How many splits per hive depends on the hive and the flow. So go ahead an make as many boxes and nucs as your end goal. I always try to keep a couple of extra boxes around because you never know when the hive starts building queen cells.

    warning I'm new and make lots of mistakes
    I have a trailer park for bees. I think some fancy people call it an apiary.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Murphy, TX
    Posts
    429

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    Where you are makes a huge difference. Someone local can give you better estimate. Out here in Texas, you can turn 1 hive in 8 or 12 easy! I turned 1 overwintered colony into 8 colonies each upto 2 medium boxes so far. I can still make summer nucs if I want but I am going to slow down now! This includes couple of failed splits.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Jacksonville, Morgan County, IL
    Posts
    205

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottankarens View Post

    Can anyone tell me from experience, about how many splits I could make from each of my hives next year? This assumes of course they survive the winter. Thank you!
    The correct answer is 'it depends'.

    If you have a fairly long, generous spring flow, a 1-to-5 split with 4 new queens is do-able.

    NOT 1-to-5-let-them-raise-a-queen..they will be so depleted by the time the first brood cycle emerges they may never recover.

    Be prepared to nurse-maid them along, feeding when it's bad weather, preferably in 5-frame boxes until they get all 5 drawn and populated, then to a 10-frame, then add another deep.

    You WILL have 5 where you had one, but at the cost of a honey crop from the one.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Murphy, TX
    Posts
    429

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    Let me be clear: I did NOT do 1-to-8 split!
    First round: 1-to-4 split in March. All raised their own mated queen but 1 failed after a month.
    Second round: 1-to-2 split on 2 stronger colonies.
    Third round: 1-to-2 split on one colony and 1-to-3 split on another.

    Again it all depends on how fast they draw and build up. Play it by the ears.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Mogollon Rim, Arizona 85933
    Posts
    747

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    In March I used my 2 stronger hives for spliting this year.
    I now have 20 nucs, and 4 strong hives from those 2, every one is is doing great.
    Nucs have been a learning experience to manage every 4-5 days out there working
    these 100+ brood factories, I'm just about of woodenware for this season.
    I didn't realize how fast these would expand.
    Last years increase was insane, this year's experiment is wickedly awesome.
    Should say I bought 20 queens, and still need 5-6 more.
    Mr Palmer, any Queens for sale?

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,550

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,452

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    I had a breeder build up to a double deep this spring, removed her w/ about 3 frames and grafted a bar of their own larva right in. Ended up splitting 7 ways with the cells.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    134

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    1 capped queen cell only needs a cup of bees and a feeder. it will be a bit slower build up, but that's a minimum.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,245

    Default Re: How many splits from 1 hive?

    I split one hive 1:6. One mating nuc got robbed out so I ended up with four splits and the parent. Made two splits from a hive that swarmed and left me a bunch of queen cells and made two mating nucs from a hive that was an overwintered nuc. It all depends on how fast the bees build up in the early spring. I started feeding heavy in January with syrup and pollen sub, but I am in Richmond, VA so your timing will be different. My plan is 3 to 20 + for this year. I am 3 to 12 now. Queens are all from cells the bees made, no purchased queens.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •