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Thread: Full Sun?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Central Alabama, Shelby County
    Posts
    323

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Mine get 2 or 3 hours of evening sun.

    The brood nest of a large cell colony is around 93*F. Natural cell a degree or two higher. What happens when the temperature goes above that level???? The colony will beard if in the evening. They will also send foragers to seek water so they can swamp cool the hive. They will reassign workload away from honey production towards airconditioning.

    After one of these incidents where the mother left a child in the car during the summer and the child died from heat, I put a recording thermometer into a white car. It got up to 150*F in about 30 minutes. Yes, I live in the subtropics of the Deep South. What's the difference in a white car and a white hive? You are greatly increasing the heat load leaving the hive in the full sun.

    Beekeeping is location dependent. Locally, where do ferel swarms choose to build? A lot choose trees. Trees are in the shade. How many choose to build in an attic?????

    I have few SHBs. SHBs are more of a management and genetic issue. Of my 20 hives 19 are ferals and Carpenters allogroomers and one is a split that someone gave me off a South GA package . Guess which one has the most SHB. There is no comparison.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Red Bud, IL, USA
    Posts
    1,801

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Let me ask this, why do you have you hives in shade?
    Because full sun isn't always an option and not having it isn't a major catastrophe. Home yard and out yards are among the trees, some get morning sun, some afternoon and some none; none are "brushed" in, all receive ventilation and not in low areas. SHB population ebb and flow from year to year, you deal with them. I occasionally lose a hive but most are strong, produce sufficiently and overwinter well.
    The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place. -George Bernard Shaw

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    10,837

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Quote Originally Posted by ToeOfDog View Post
    What's the difference in a white car and a white hive?
    To start with, cars have lots of glass that isn't found in a typical hive. The sun's rays are largely reflected by white opaque materials, but largely pass through glass. And once inside the vehicle, most of that solar energy is absorbed by the interior materials of the passenger area. A car is a poor model of what happens to a hive in the sun.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Deerfield, Illinois
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    I have two yards with most hives in one yard and only a few in another yard. Based on 10 years of experience the hives that receives late morning sun are much weaker than the early morning sun hives. It may have to do with queen and a variety of other issues but I am convinced that in my geographical location, the hives receiving early morning sun do much better. Although there are exceptions the best performers receive the first morning sun and generally are in the sun all day until late afternoon. I attribute this to my observation that the bees do not become active until they receive a certain amount of warmth from the morning sun. I could follow the pattern of the sun as it rises on my hives and the bee activity is directly attributable to the time the sun shines on the hive. Few exceptions.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    In full sun, bees fly erlyer in post-winter flights , so weak and diseased bees die far from the hive.

    Bees usualy mantain a fair temperature inside the hive. I have them in full sun, some near Lisbon that in summer max. temp. is @ 35 ~38 Celsius and some further north, near Spain where temp. arrives to 40~44 Celsius.

    Last year Ive monitored the temperature inside the hives in both places with a chip measure during all summer. The highest temp. registered was 45 C in Lisbon at 1~1.30 pm (in August) and 47 C in the second place @ 2 pm at first of September ( in a day that was a heat stroke of 45 C ).

  7. #26
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    473

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Quote Originally Posted by ToeOfDog View Post
    The brood nest of a large cell colony is around 93*F. Natural cell a degree or two higher. What happens when the temperature goes above that level???? The colony will beard if in the evening. They will also send foragers to seek water so they can swamp cool the hive. They will reassign workload away from honey production towards airconditioning.

    After one of these incidents where the mother left a child in the car during the summer and the child died from heat, I put a recording thermometer into a white car. It got up to 150*F in about 30 minutes. Yes, I live in the subtropics of the Deep South. What's the difference in a white car and a white hive? You are greatly increasing the heat load leaving the hive in the full sun.
    Bees don't just collect water for aircon, otherwise they wouldn't have been sitting on the bottom board lapping up water from the rain last night (<60F temperature).
    Maybe the correlation of water collection in hot and dry periods is more than just aircon. The bees need water for other processes...

    I'd argue that bees do a decent job on their own.
    Somebody forgot to give my bees a copy of the book.
    Zone 6B

  8. #27
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    473

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    To start with, cars have lots of glass that isn't found in a typical hive. The sun's rays are largely reflected by white opaque materials, but largely pass through glass. And once inside the vehicle, most of that solar energy is absorbed by the interior materials of the passenger area. A car is a poor model of what happens to a hive in the sun.
    And a bee hive isn't completely sealed up from airflow like a car is.
    Last edited by m0dem; 06-16-2017 at 12:50 PM.
    Somebody forgot to give my bees a copy of the book.
    Zone 6B

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Quote Originally Posted by antonioh View Post
    In full sun, bees fly erlyer in post-winter flights , so weak and diseased bees die far from the hive.

    Bees usualy mantain a fair temperature inside the hive. I have them in full sun, some near Lisbon that in summer max. temp. is @ 35 ~38 Celsius and some further north, near Spain where temp. arrives to 40~44 Celsius.

    Last year Ive monitored the temperature inside the hives in both places with a chip measure during all summer. The highest temp. registered was 45 C in Lisbon at 1~1.30 pm (in August) and 47 C in the second place @ 2 pm at first of September ( in a day that was a heat stroke of 45 C ).
    The chip was placed under the top cover on Langstroth single deep hives , so above the chip there was only the top cover and the roof.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    239

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Quote Originally Posted by Planner View Post
    I have two yards with most hives in one yard and only a few in another yard. Based on 10 years of experience the hives that receives late morning sun are much weaker than the early morning sun hives. It may have to do with queen and a variety of other issues but I am convinced that in my geographical location, the hives receiving early morning sun do much better. Although there are exceptions the best performers receive the first morning sun and generally are in the sun all day until late afternoon. I attribute this to my observation that the bees do not become active until they receive a certain amount of warmth from the morning sun. I could follow the pattern of the sun as it rises on my hives and the bee activity is directly attributable to the time the sun shines on the hive. Few exceptions.
    So would you say the entrance position has something to do with it, or not so much? If my hives all got the same sunlight, should I worry about entrance location?

    edit: wow, didn't see how old the post was

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Rock Hill, SC
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: Full Sun?

    Quote Originally Posted by Beehumble79 View Post
    I've often wondered about this. Where I'm at in South Carolina, I can't imagine that full sun through the summer is optimal.....at all.
    I live in South Carolina. I keep mine in full sun but I use screened hive bottoms and screened inner covers. The bees can keep it cool with enough ventilation.
    Beeswax melts at 185 F.

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