Disease risk from dipping boxes?
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  1. #1
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    Default Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Do you risk diseases from dipping boxes in wax? Or does the heating process sterilize the wax?

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    A- heat will destroy many of the microbes
    B-wax will encapsulate all the microbes, whether killed by heat or not.

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Around here the only person I know who does this for others will not dip anything but brand new wooden ware because of the cross-contamination risk.

    Although high heat will kill "many of the microbes", does that mean it is proven to kill AFB spores?

    And is there no possibility of AFB- contaminated wax?

    Enj.

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    I'm thinking more contamination coming from the wax. I would only be dipping new boxes. I don't have enough wax so I would have to buy it. I'm guessing it comes mixed from thousands of hives rather than 1 source.

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Is 300 degrees got enough to kill spores? I would guess it would kill most other diseases, but I'm worried about afb specifically.

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Is there anything else to dip them in with no wax that is bee safe?

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Jamie

    Quick search led me here... http://www.api-curious.com/american-foulbrood/

    "AFB spores can last several decades. They can be killed with bleach, temperatures over 320 F, or a boiling 20% lye solution."

    Not sure how reliable this is, but you asked about temperatures.

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Thanks. Wonder how long it needs to be kept over 320, i would think 10 minutes or so would be enough.

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    It is a common treatment in Australia and New Zealand to wax dip AFB infected equipment. It is apparently one of their main reasons for doing it.

    www.afb.org.nz/wax-dipping
    https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/downloads/01-051
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    I admit I read that link quickly, but it appeared they were talking about dipping in paraffin. Everything I've read has to do with dipping in part beeswax part paraffin. So dipping in straight paraffin appears to be an option?

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Bleach kills AFB?
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  13. #12
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    I think chlorine bleach on non-porous surfaces (for instance metal hive tools) might be useful against AFB. At least in combination with other treatments.

    Last summer I watched a state bee-inspector sanitize his hive tool using, first, a chlorine-based scrubbing powder (old-fashioned Comet with bleach, I believe it was) and water, then rinsing, and finally, an immersion in isopropyl alcohol. The scrubbing powder was intended not only as a sanitizer (the bleach component) but also as method of physically removing bits of wax and propolis with their spore burdens.

    This was after inspection of a colony with suspected EFB. Not really something you could do to wooden ware with any hope of success.

    Enj.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Yes, the articles linked above are dipping in paraffin and rosin or microcrystalline paraffin.

    Flashpoint of paraffin:
    Paraffin wax without additives: 390.2˚F (199˚C )

    Flashpoint of beeswax:
    400F (204.4C)

    Rosin raises both. It's a combination of the heat (much higher than boiling point of water) and the encapsulation that is probably responsible for the AFB control.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Disease risk from dipping boxes?

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    Around here the only person I know who does this for others will not dip anything but brand new wooden ware because of the cross-contamination risk.

    Although high heat will kill "many of the microbes", does that mean it is proven to kill AFB spores?

    And is there no possibility of AFB- contaminated wax?

    Enj.
    Nancy who around us dips boxes?

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