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  1. #381
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    SiW....
    Fresh produce good.

    Steve
    Looks like they are coming and going and finding something for you. I am running mediums and my old bee part of the splits are crowded big time. The population will go down big time when the all start dieing. Got to take advantage of their comb drawing ability while it is there.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

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  3. #382
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    I am still struggling. Today is the 5th day from when I did my fly back splits counting the day that I did them. It does not look like it is going too well on the queen making department to me.

    I still have never found the queen on the one but have not looked at the original hive part that I had added a frame of what I hope was a few larva young enough to make queens with. I got too hot and had to quit for awhile. If they made queen cells, I don't know where she is cause I don't see any new laying (if my eyes are even good enough).

    The only thing I found in the first hive was this.

    Compared to the bees it looks pretty dinky and I did not think it would be quite capped yet if it was a good one. The bees were protecting it and fussing over it and I had to move them with my finger for the picture.

    They all have some carbs in the splits


    The next split I did not see anything that was viable and looked hard for the queen or new laying (just in case). What I don't get is that the hive is calm (all of them were) and I saw this one bringing in some tan pollen on the few foragers that is still seems to have kept some how, not many. Queenless, calm and pollen doesn't add up. I was hoping to find a queen cell to drop into it but the bees are making no extras or even enough to solve their own problems. I still have to do something here.

    The next one was trying hard.

    However, all the started cells looked dry with nothing in them. They had a lot of them. I did find two partial cells that I at least saw larva in and moved one of the frames to the first hive that seemed to have the small cell in it. These cells are not developed quite as much as the first one and was more what I was thinking I would find. I am still worried for two reasons. The cell development is not as far along and so may be a harri karry type move on the bees part and non of them were swimming in royal jelly and just looked more like larva. At least this one frame did have some pollen in it.

    If my memory is not going south on me, this was the only cell I found in the fourth one but at least it was wet and not dry. I really can't see and had to take these to the side and prop one end of the frame on the ground and shine a flashlight up in them.

    I never saw bees so unwilling to give me a good cell or two but I was worried when I made the splits cause I could not find any young stuff that I was sure of. Even though it was two whole hives, it looked like they had not been laying for a bit. I am not sure how this is all going to work out. I don't know whether to leave them alone (except the one I found nothing in) or just keep robbing from the other hives and dropping frame of open brood in and seeing what they do with them.

    Hummm, what to do?
    Cheers
    gww

    Ps. I already know my pictures suck. I wanted to take more but am not a multi tasker and was dying of heat.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    zone 5b

  4. #383

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Im not an experienced beekeeper and this s only my humble personal interpretation, not that the bees talk to me ( yet) however hard I try...

    In my eyes the situation looks as if you did not use the right time, the bees were not ready to multiply even if a queen might result with this cells. They seem to prefer to use the flow.

    Itīs not always that bee colonies separate into two parts every year. And there might be some problems if they are forced.

    Thatīs why we group plan to use the swarm mode. This could mean loss of swarms or multiple nucs with healthy queen cells.

    And that could mean a difference between emergency and vitale queen cells. I rather go for the natural swarm urge now that I experienced the difference. It was amazing and Iīm still in awe f how prolific a colony could be that swarmed.

  5. #384
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Glenn, the emergency cell in the first picture did not look that dinky too me. Remember that the cell is actually half an inch longer when you consider the horizontal part. I have full sized queens come from cells just like that one. Capped on day five is ok, day four is not.

    I know we disagree on the use of pollen sub but you might want to try adding some on your next spilts to see if you get more cells. They will only make what they can feed and it is pollen that is needed to make royal jelly.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  6. #385
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Siw...
    I agree with what you say mostly. I just thought that these hives were not going to make much honey this year and it seemed a waste not to do something productive with them.

    I have three more that I could have played with also but figured I would just experiment. For what you want to do, my methods are probably not good. It may sound sad, but I am not going for queen quality but more for salvage operation.

    I figure if I get a queen good enough to keep the hive going and growing, I can replace her later if I want when times are better. Could this lower my stock, probably but I am dealing with mutts anyway and so having a few numbers make it though winter gives me another chance at it come spring.

    We should still have some flow going on but the kind of split I made forces the bees to use what is already in the hive cause I removed all the foragers. If I did care more then I do, I could have made the queen cells on top of my strongest hives and then did the split after they were capped. Since I do not plan that well, I have to trust the bees to help me.

    JW
    Thanks for your thoughts on the queen cell. I have my fingers crossed. On the pollen sub, I have zero doubt that it might help but just don't buy things and don't plan or have systems in place yet to collect my own. The one frame in the picture has enough pollen but I am sure the other hives are lacking and it might be why there was not much open brood in the hives when I did the split.

    I am just running from self created issues and getting by each hurdle one at a time. These were just box splits where one box goes here with whatever is in it and one goes there. I was still expecting it to work out some way but not the best way. I could have put an excluder over a really strong hive with some brood above it and got better bee density for feeding and still had foragers to get what might be needed but I took the easy way with faith that it would probably work in the end. Of course to get it to work half as--d might be more work then doing it right.

    So it is just this emergency that I am handling now though I am keeping track of the better ways for next time if needed. Thanks for your suggestion, I am sure it is best.
    Thanks guys
    gww
    zone 5b

  7. #386

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    gww,
    why work so complicated?
    Just make a small split with queen or if you donīt find her split half half, after some hours or a day look or hear which hive is queenless and place this at the old location with foragers so the cells are fed accordingly?
    If it does not work combine again until more eggs and young brood is in?
    If the broodnest is honey bound take out an outer comb with nectar and give it back later to the splits? So they probably will raise more brood and swarm mode is prevented?

    The queenless should raise cells like that:
    http://www.vivabiene.de/g20p371-baa-...eniginnen.html

    One of my co-workers splitted he wanted to have queen cells to use for different small nucs. He nicked the just hatched egg cells to have that area as cells to cut out. The first time it did not work, it was too early in year.
    He combined again and waited two more weeks now it worked beautifully and he has a little queen breeding project with juicy cells. It was just not the right time then.

  8. #387
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Siw
    why work so complicated?
    Just make a small split with queen or if you donīt find her split half half, after some hours or a day look or hear which hive is queenless and place this at the old location with foragers so the cells are fed accordingly?
    If it does not work combine again until more eggs and young brood is in?
    If the broodnest is honey bound take out an outer comb with nectar and give it back later to the splits? So they probably will raise more brood and swarm mode is prevented?
    Except for finding the queen in the beginning, how is just setting three boxes of a hive in three different places complicated.

    I can always combine again if a queen in each is not mated.

    I was not worried about swarming cause I think, knock on wood, that swarming is over for the year here.

    This was done for pure increase of hive numbers on hives that were not going to produce this year. It probably won't hurt the mite load in those six hives if they work out either.

    My way seems not very complicated, I take it on faith that there is enough young larva in each box to make a queen and if not, add brood or combine.

    I knew it was getting late from prime time but wanted to do it while catching the end of the flow so the young hives could get some foragers before the bees thought about robbing.

    I could have made the cells on top of a strong queen right hive if premium cells was the goal and it would not have been much more work but I had faith the bees would make stuff that was "good enough and was easier. If I was going for the best, JW's suggestion of pollen patties would have been good and feeding to have a flow would have been even better. However if it works, what I did is much simpler.

    It is a good experiment that I have not done during this time of year and I was expecting better, over confident on my queen finding ability and second guessing and wanting to see has made it harder. Had I just did it and left the ones that looked normal from outside the hive at the entrance, I bet it would have worked on most and I could combine or shake out the ones that it did not work on and still have more hives from doing it.

    I was surprised that the bees did not do better and make more and better cells compared to when they are preparing to swarm, but it is still a good leaning experience and all this extra work and looking and asking should make me understand more about bee keeping.

    I know lots of ways to split and make queens from reading and nothing is that hard but the doing is always eye opening and puts actual experience to help see what they meant as much as what they wrote.

    It was hard on me and the bees getting in the hives everyday in weather that is trying to kill me while I am killing bees. But is is worth doing and next time I might not even look. I do say this on your hive with out a queen being noisy. All of these hives are calm, none are flapping their wings like michael palmer video. I am also training my eyes that may not be working correctly.

    I knew I was not timing the splits in prime time and that I was not giving the bees as much help as could be but still expect it to work but maybe not on every one. I thought about notching some cells but figured the bees would find enough to protect themselves. I could be wrong cause I am having a hard time seeing things that are over the top good and the stuff I am seeing is right on the edge of failure but I am usually lucky. Time will tell. I write this not to say that your suggestions have no merit but to show that I am a minimalist and deserve what I get. I need the suggestions for those times that my sloppyness does not work so I have things to add to what I do till it does work good enough for me.
    Thanks
    gww

    Ps I knew it was not prime time and the hives did not think of it but I also know if I lose four of them over winter, I will still be as good as I was if I did not do it. I may not end up with six hives when done but bet I end up with more then two that can make winter.
    zone 5b

  9. #388
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    The problem with just splitting the boxes is that the brood is not evenly divided. When I went into my #4 hive to get larvae for my grafts this past Sunday, the top box was all capped brood. Had to get into the bottom box to find what I was looking for.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  10. #389
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Jw
    Yes, there are risk. My view on it is that it only takes one egg though. I did make sure that there was some stores everywhere though I have so little stored pollen that I did not go so far as to divide that but more relied on the bees having a few small bands of it above where brood is laid. For better or worse, the boxes where full of bees and after the split, I knew there may be some disparity in what was left after the foragers left and there is a little. But in the end, they have drawn comb that they will be emptying due to few foragers starting out. So if I get a queen, she will have a place to lay and if the bee density is enough, they will all grow but just at different rates based on how many bees they start with. Sorta like a two brood frame split compared to a 4 brood frame split. Both work.

    What you said is the reason I went back in to make sure the bees did have queen cells. It they get a queen, the rest can be worked out as easily as switching places of hives.

    I did see what was in each box cause on the first one, it was the second to last frame that I found the queen on and the other, I looked through twice and never did see the queen. I knew when I made the split that I was not seeing any open brood to speak of in any box and so knew the odds but blamed it a bit on my eyes and took the chance on the basis that the bees only need to find one viable to make a queen.

    I looked at the old e split yesterday afternoon and it only had one brood frame in it and I had added another brood frame from a different hive that I did find some open brood with some larva big enough for me to see. They say foragers don't feed queens as well (I did move the frames with bees on them) but the bees found something on both frames and the cells look a little better. My view, more bee density and lots of help to bring needed things into the hive.

    I took it on faith that in each box there would be something to work with cause even looking, I could not see in any box of the hives I split stuff to be sure of.

    I do not understand the slow down of laying by the bees at this time of the year in these hives when I had no swarms and they had not already started cells. It had to be that the flow had waned and the queen had slowed down. I need to figure the flows out better if I am not going to supplement with feed when I do this stuff. I thought flow wise, I should be good till early july and maybe I will and it was a small lull.

    I can look but can not see. Ray told me, reading glasses or magnifying glass. I base most of my hive inspecting and thought patterns on capped brood pattern cause it is easiest to see. I take it for granted that as the capped hatches the queen tries to refill. Sometimes I get lucky and see the bigger larva as a bonus. If this quits working good enough for me, I will have to get a magnifying glass.

    I was hoping with practice that I would get a little better at seeing the smaller stuff just though training my eyes and I am working on that but it might come down to needing glasses during inspections.

    I could tell on these two hives there was not much though.

    I still have one queen that I don't know where it went and the hives are all calm and so that is not telling me anything but that maybe they are all confident of getting queenrite. I have other hives to use to keep dropping resources to anything questionable and can combine when sure something did not work.
    Love the suggestions while all of this is going on. You comments do help me formulate going forward and for next time. Of course I am not above repeating some mistake more then once.
    I am a guy that is in panic mode but also don't take it too seriously.
    I expect to get better over time and you guys do help.
    Thanks
    gww
    zone 5b

  11. #390

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    gww,
    while catching the end of the flow so the young hives could get some foragers before the bees thought about robbing.
    I donīt understand this. Which bees think about robbing?
    The bees have watchers before those become foragers. So if they are well provided ( because you feed or have given them honey comb) you need watchers in that hive ( or robber screens if you have weak splits).
    The scout bees of other hives search for access into weak hives if there is no flow and if they are successful they tell their own foragers and those start to rob.

    I can see egg or young larvae only if the sun shines on the comb, so if I need to see it I use a sunny day. No chance when itīs cloudy.
    Last edited by 1102009; 06-13-2018 at 09:47 AM. Reason: more

  12. #391
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    SiW
    I donīt understand this. Which bees think about robbing?
    I was thinking all bees have the potential to rob. When I got my first hive and I mentioned to the guy I got it from the different rates of build up and stores, he said one of them could have had more robbing pressure and that even in a flow bees will rob if it is easy pickings. I am almost positive that the little warre did not build up last year due to continual robbing pressure. It did not kill them but they did not build up even during the flows.

    The bees have watchers before those become foragers. So if they are well provided ( because you feed or have given them honey comb) you need watchers in that hive ( or robber screens if you have weak splits).
    I do not pretend I know the make up of a hive and so can only say what I thought.

    I thought it was the older bees that were the guard bees. I thought that mostly the young and nurse bees were docile and that is why you can dump them on a different hive and they would be accepted by that hive even if not carrying gifts. My mind may have made the shift that it works both ways and the young bees are accepting of the old bees in the same fashion. Just what I was thinking, not that I am right.

    If as you say, the intermediate bees guard the entrance, if I make a purely young bee split, they will still have a small force to guard the entrance cause you will continually lose some of them over the next week cause when they did their first orientation flight at the old location before coming back into the hive for a week and so they will some of them slowly leave for a week after the move.

    If I take a hive that was strong in two mediums and spread them out to three different places and in three boxes, just by virtue of that they are weaker then they were and add that some are purely young bees and have no queen and I figured (right or wrong) that that would be a thing that would have more potential to be exploited by the bigger hives then it was before the move.

    I saw the other day a comment from michael bush of when would be a good time to make a late split and he said ten days before the flow ended. I figured part of that was for queen quality and part was less robbing pressure. He did not say that was why, it was my interpretation of why he might say 10 days before the flow ended.

    As far as seeing eggs and the sun. My hives are right up against a cedar line to the north. If you could have seen me turning my back to the hives and holding the comb up or walking ten feet off to get a better lighting and trying not to turn the comb on its side where it might break out but instead moving my head all around, you would surely got one heck of a laugh and I am glad it is not on video.

    I was taking a good flash light and looking up into the queen cells trying to make sure if it was dry or there was something in them.

    What I normally do is look for bigger larva and see if the pattern is big but getting smaller and then guess on the rest. I think I have seen eggs with my naked eye a couple of times but am always worried if that is what I really saw or if it was the lines from the cell on the other side of the comb with the sun just shining right.

    The only saving grace in all this is my belief that the queen will most times lay a small amount of brood all year long and it might only be a few in the dearth or winter but most times there is probably a couple of eggs in any hive. I am sure there are times with none but believe there are not many times and they are not long. So I sorta look at it like you would on buying insurance or not, what are the odds.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  13. #392

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    I was thinking all bees have the potential to rob.
    In a crowded bee yard there is always silent robbing maybe, but the real robbing frenzy, killing a hive, if it was a potential in every colony like a genetic trait, no beekeeper would have more than one hive in his yard.IMHO.

    This frenzy , once again IMO, is often started by the beekeeper by placing open honey somewhere. In my mail contact to Erik he send me a photo how he harvests. He takes of the supers with lids on them, places them on a ground and later harvests when he has done this with all hives. I look forward to see this managements in 2 weeks when Iīm in sweden. I have never watched a work flow of a commercial beekeeper.

    Also I observe in my location that many beekeepers neglect to feed the bees after harvesting the whole stores. What if the brood nests are big open brood and have not much honey domes?
    People talk about robbing exactly after doing this. I would not blame the bees getting desperate to feed their brood!

    My queenless splits were very small this year because the bigger ones swarmed and got caught. There was no traffic for some time. The bigger ones and the former dink, now filling the box, did not rob them or try to.

    The not swarmed hive I made almost half half because I had problems to find enough very young larvae or eggs too, the nest was honey bound.
    I placed the queen near because I wanted to even out the foragers more and so was it. Some foragers were lured by the queen pheromones and went in the others stayed at the old location.

    I have seen a picture with a small nuc with queen hanging on the rim of the queenless full hive box until a new queen was raised. Pretty cool, I will try this sometimes. Like raising queen cells on top of a queen right hive but not as much work and opening hives.

  14. #393
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    SiW
    I find I can leave a cup of sugar water out during a flow and the bees will ignore it. Earlier in my thread you will see a picture of my sugar blocks that I pulled off in spring. Later in the thread, you will see those same sugar blocks that I did not put away properly and the bees were all over them. The bees could care less that those sugar blocks were sitting out until they did care. I notice the same about the bees and me. There are times that the bees always come find me and check me out and others where they do not. When they do, I know they are looking cause not much is out there. I think watching the water bowl works to see if there is a flow or not and bees being there means as much that there is no flow as it does if it is hot. In the bad times with real stress, the bees will sting me when I sit down by the hives. Luckily this is usually not very often but is regular certain times of the year.
    I don't use robbing screens and just use reducers but I also know it can change in one day.
    If you pay attention, it is usually ok but the potential is there and it happens fast when it happens.

    Making up early nucs is one time it can get bad.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  15. #394

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    My first mentor hanged comb containing crystallized honey at his fence ( this is illegal here because of the spreading of AFB spores but he did it anyway) this did not induce robbing.

    In bee class my teacher forgot to close a box with honey combs we wanted to extract this started a frenzy.

    I wonder if the honey combs smell of a special colony and if I donate it it might draw the original hive. So far not, but I have screens and small entrance and the elgon bees have serious entrance defense.

    Same with donating brood combs...mmh. Perhaps. Every colony must have itīs own perfume.

    To getting stung: when I left my day job some days ago I was stung in the small toe by a bee on clover, me walking to my car. God that hurt! But no swelling. The bee was trapped in my sandal.

    One of the queenless at the yard tried to kill us when we opened. I believe the new queen was still on mating flights and this was one day she was partying with the gents. The left behind were stressed because they awaited her, I saw fanning but wanted to see anyway. A mistake!
    Some days later they were very calm, same hive. Must have been a good party!

  16. #395
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Yesterday after two days in a row of just tearing away at the inside of the hives, I had two bees just hanging around my veil and going up and down me. Normally I can back off and they will forget. These two just stayed with me the whole time. Only two and I was scared they might whip up some help. So today when I was sitting in front of the hives and walking behind them and standing to the side to see if they were bringing in pollen, it was those two bees that was on my mine. I get stung and it hurts but doesn't really bother me but the thought of getting stung can give one bee the power to buzz me and make me go away.
    Wearing open shoes like I do, its a wonder I don't get stung lots more and like you said, just walking in the clover and not even working bees. I did get stung as a kid a few times cause we went bare foot a lot.

    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  17. #396
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    I got into most of the splits today.
    One has the one small cell that I took a picture of.

    One has two cells drawn on brand new comb and they are bigger and prettier.

    I finally found the queen in one of the moved hives. It has been ten days and I looked for laying and thought that the brood would be big enough to see very easily but all I could see was dark shiny cells and I don't know if it was honey or brood. It got cloudy enough to hive the sun and I thought I should have seen easily. It is supposed to rain or I would have waited a day or two to look and the brood would have been capped if there was any. It is no wonder I could not find the queen the few times I looked before. She is the smallest one I have seen yet and does not have the bright orange-ish tail that most of my other queens have and it is more dark. The hive is bringing in pollen and I do know she was laying before the move and so I am going to take it on faith that everything is ok here.

    A couple of the splits are going through stores and they still have some but I am going to have to move more to them or feed before it is all over.

    I have two mediums with the exception of a couple frames capped and it seems that the brood has all hatched and they are clear for extraction. I have another medium that looks the same on a three medium hive but is I take it, I won't have the brood nest of three mediums. It seems that the hives have started reducing rather then go up into the fourth medium and drawing wax and so I reversed this and put the medium with only a ladder comb or two under the filled medium. I think I could get some honey if I am willing to take the hives down to two mediums rather then three. I had thought I had kept the hives clear of having honey domes right above the brood nest. I do not know if it was the bees were not strong enough or the honey dome made them happy enough to live with what they got rather then expand more.

    I am sure hoping the flow is not coming to an end just yet. I saw a bunch of bees on my neighbors blue hydrangea and now know where some of the white pollen is coming from.
    Cheers
    gww

    Ps I did see larva about to be capped in my other old bee split that did get a queen but that did not seem to be bringing in much pollen

    ps ps I do have one hive hotter then the rest
    zone 5b

  18. #397
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    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Ok, I really suck at extracting honey.


    It took me and my wife (who is a fast efficient worker) nine freaking hours to extract 5 gal from pulling the supers to replacing the wet supers back on the hive. And I still had one this morning left that I had to put on a hive.

    It was hot and the hives missed the extra space of the supers being on them.


    I pulled one super that had four frames of brood in it. I had looked that morning and pulled three frames that were capped and stopped and just pulled it. For all I know I pulled the queen. It might be a favor if I did get the queen cause this is my hottest hive and I might pull her someday anyway. It is in no way unworkable but just something you can notice compared to the rest of the hives. I left the four frames of brood and all the bees I shook off of three supers from three hives in my yard last night.


    I was pretty sure that putting three hives worth of bees in a box of brood was a death sentence for said brood due to robbing but I woke up and when I opened it, the frames had good coverage and were calm and so I set them back on my hot hive.

    All the extracting equipment is out in the grass being cleaned for me and so extracting was more then nine hours cause I am not done yet and this for 5 gal of honey? Bee keepers are crazy or I just suck at extracting.

    I tried using a leaf blower to clear the supers of bees and it did not do a good job. The brood could have been part of the bees hanging on so hard and the misshape of some of the foundationless comb probably provides some protection from the blower. In the end, I moved the supers to my yard and pulled one frame at a time and used a clump of grass to brush the frames free of bees. I have no complaint on how the clump of grass worked on removing bees but I did leave little pieces of grass every time I carried a frame into the house and kept getting a piece or two caught in the sliding door every time I closed it.

    Not much of a honey harvest but maybe the bees will still have time to refill the frames, maybe not.

    I can not believe how hard extracting is. It makes me consider crush and strain.

    I think everything is back to normal in the apiary and now just to wait and see how many of the splits end up queen right.
    Cheers
    gww
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  19. #398
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    3,941

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    This is the next afternoon after the pictures in my last post.

    The after math after extraction is a lot of dead bee. It could be from confusion from when I blew them out but my thought is that it was a robbing situation due to just the excitement cause except for pulling supers and using a leaf blower, the hives did not change that much except losing a little space. It may show the lagging of the flow also. Do most see this many dead bees when the pull supers for extracting? Do those that do several extractions a year have this happen every time? I am not worried, just curious of what is normal. All the hives seem to be back to normal today and so it was a short term thing but pretty dramatic if you ask me.
    Cheers
    gww

    ps, the picture doesn't do it justice but there were quite a few dead bees. They did seem to be mostly congregated around the hives that supers were pulled from, and I have some small hives in and splits in this apiary and they seem unaffected. I know I am not that rough and did not really mess around long for bees to really get interested in open hives. I set the supers on the ground blew them and moved them.
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  20. #399
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,407

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Glenn, I helped a friend extract two supers of honey last week from a dead out. With three of us it took six hours. In our defense, a lot of the honey was crystalized and we were using an uncapping fork because the comb was too hard to use a knife. But that also included squeezing the cappings and hard comb and doing the first rendering of the wax. Lot of work for two gallons net and maybe 1/2 lb of wax. Somewhere along the way, a 12 pack disappeared.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  21. #400
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    3,941

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Jw
    That was my mistake, had I made a twelve pack disappear, I may not have noticed the nine hours and hurting back so bad. It is a good suggestion.

    I have never crushed and strained but a comb or two at a time and those times it was new wax and I found it very easy compared to spinning the comb. It may not scale up very well.

    I do find that getting the honey that the bees have made to be real hard. I am not a good worker but my wife is.


    I am glad to have the bucket now that it is done but have found no short cuts yet that make me think next time is going to be much easier. I saw your new maxent extractor. After you use it, maybe you can give me a report on how long you have to spin to get well extracted combs.

    I am going about ten minutes every four frames and I have room to adjust speed (at least till I get more blow outs) but am not sure what is normal. My extractor is home made and I have only used it three times. I might be leaving them a little wet even at ten minutes. Either way, it would be nice to know what you have luck with time wise.
    Thanks
    gww
    zone 5b

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